Events


CASP

Conversation Analysis Skills & Practices (CASP) Workshop

9th–10th March 2019
At York St John University, Hosted and Organised by CARDS at Ulster

The CASP (Conversation Analysis Skills and Practices) Workshop was a two-day workshop to develop practical skills relevant for doing Conversation Analytic research. Over the two days, PGRs and ERCs using Conversation Analysis (CA) networked, shared and developed vital practical skills across a number of sessions which drew on the expertise within the PGR/ECR community. Sessions included: Using Audio Software, Using Video Software, Access and Ethics, Practicalities and Tools for Collecting Data, Building and Managing Collections, Giving CA Presentations, Outreach and Impact and Publishing CA Research.

The workshop opened up opportunities for students across the UK (and beyond) to become and feel part of the wider CA community (especially those doing CA research in relative isolation since these practical skills are very particular to CA but not explicitly discussed in the research literature). CASP Workshop came about to provide a much-needed opportunity to open up discussion between CA researchers on the practicalities of doing CA research. The workshop provided an opportunity for student-led and student-centred sharing of expertise. The event was supported by the Linguistic Association of Great Britain (LAGB), Ulster University, and York St John University.


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ESRC Festival of Social Science

“So… umm let’s y’know talk about spoken language”

5th November 2019
At The Black Box, 18–22 Hill Street, Belfast, 12:00–14:00

A team of our CARDS researchers is excited to present an interactive workshop exploring much-maligned “filler words” like um, well, and like and the role they play in our everyday conversations. The internet is full of articles telling us how to rid our speech of these “dysfluencies”, and pundits often claim they are lazy, distracting, or a sign of incompetence based on expectations from written language. But what if we take these features of spoken language seriously? What does social science tell us about the differences between speaking and talking? We’ll be answering these questions and more in this 2-hour session as part of the ESRC Festival of Social Science.

We would particularly encourage teachers and students of English Language to attend, but anyone curious about how everyday talk really works is welcome to join us by registering here.