Mechanical Engineering
MEng (Hons)

2022/23 Full-time Undergraduate course

Award:

Master of Engineering with Honours

Faculty:

Faculty of Computing, Engineering and the Built Environment

School:

School of Engineering

Campus:

Belfast campus

UCAS code:

H302
The UCAS code for Ulster University is U20

Start date:

September 2022

With this degree you could become:


  • Aero Space Stress Engineer
  • Design Engineer
  • Manufacturing & Quality Engineer
  • Materials and Processes Engineer
  • Project Engineer
  • Quality Engineer

Graduates from this course are now working for:


  • B E Aerospace
  • Caterpillar
  • CDE Global
  • Jaguar Land Rover
  • Mallaghan Engineering
  • Seagate Technology
  • Terex

Overview

Mechanical engineers design, create and analyse moving things, solving 21st century problems and shaping the next generation of technology.

Summary

Mechanical engineers create, design and manufacture all kinds of products and processes across a wide range of industries. From automotive to medical devices, aerospace to renewable energy, or materials processing to mobile phones, mechanical engineers are involved at all stages of the product life cycle.

This MEng course will prepare you for a career that is both challenging and rewarding. There is an emphasis on individual and team projects, giving you the opportunity for hands-on involvement and an understanding of engineering materials, processes, devices and systems. Analytical and communication skills are developed with an emphasis on computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacture (CAM). The skills and knowledge acquired are applied to a wide range of real-life engineering problems.

Through a wide range of learning experiences you will develop the intellectual, technical and professional skills that are needed to address 21st century challenges in industry and society. Themes of Design, Mechanical Systems, Materials and Manufacturing run through the course and are further developed through group and individual project work, practical and computer labs, and a range of specialist research-led modules, preparing you for both your industrial placement year and your future career.


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About this course

About

This course has been designed with the aid of industrialists to address the needs of industry and the research community. The MEng and BEng Hons Mechanical Engineering courses are taught and assessed in common over the first two years. The third year of each programme is spent on Placement – and successful completion of the Placement year leads to a Diploma in Professional Practice (DPP) which is awarded at Graduation. The BEng Hons students have one additional year of study whereas the MEng students have two additional years of study.

Associate awards

Diploma in Professional Practice DPP

Diploma in Professional Practice International DPPI

Diploma in International Academic Studies DIAS

Find out more about placement awards

Attendance

Typically 18 – 20 hours per week class contact time between 9.15 am and 6.05 pm. There are no timetabled activities on Wednesday afternoons.

Start dates

  • September 2022

Teaching, Learning and Assessment

Programmes employ a broad range of teaching and assessment styles and place an emphasis on practical demonstrations and on interactive learning opportunities including project-based and group-based activities. The course combines traditional lectures, tutorials and laboratory based classes with technology facilitated resources and activities.

The programme uses a wide range of assessment methods including formal examinations, seen and unseen problems in class tests, on-line multiple-choice assessments, laboratory reports, projects, poster sessions, oral presentations, and peer assessment, where group project work is involved.

Content

The content for each course is summarised on the relevant course page, along with an overview of the modules that make up the course.

Each course is approved by the University and meets the expectations of:

Attendance and Independent Study

As part of your course induction, you will be provided with details of the organisation and management of the course, including attendance and assessment requirements - usually in the form of a timetable. For full-time courses, the precise timetable for each semester is not confirmed until close to the start date and may be subject to some change in the early weeks as all courses settle into their planned patterns. For part-time courses which require attendance on particular days and times, an expectation of the days and periods of attendance will be included in the letter of offer. A course handbook is also made available.

Courses comprise modules for which the notional effort involved is indicated by its credit rating. Each credit point represents 10 hours of student effort. Undergraduate courses typically contain 10- or 20-credit modules (more usually 20) and postgraduate course typically 15- or 30-credit modules.

The normal study load expectation for an undergraduate full-time course of study in the standard academic year is 120 credit points. This amounts to around 36-42 hours of expected teaching and learning per week, inclusive of attendance requirements for lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical work, fieldwork or other scheduled classes, private study, and assessment. Part-time study load is the same as full-time pro-rata, with each credit point representing 10 hours of student effort.

Postgraduate Master’s courses typically comprise 180 credits, taken in three semesters when studied full-time. A Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) comprises 60 credits and can usually be completed on a part-time basis in one year. A 120-credit Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) can usually be completed on a part-time basis in two years.

Class contact times vary by course and type of module. Typically, for a module predominantly delivered through lectures you can expect at least 3 contact hours per week (lectures/seminars/tutorials). Laboratory classes often require a greater intensity of attendance in blocks. Some modules may combine lecture and laboratory. The precise model will depend on the course you apply for and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. Prospective students will be consulted about any significant changes.

Assessment

Assessment methods vary and are defined explicitly in each module. Assessment can be a combination of examination and coursework but may also be only one of these methods. Assessment is designed to assess your achievement of the module’s stated learning outcomes. You can expect to receive timely feedback on all coursework assessment. The precise assessment will depend on the module and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

Coursework can take many forms, for example: essay, report, seminar paper, test, presentation, dissertation, design, artefacts, portfolio, journal, group work. The precise form and combination of assessment will depend on the course you apply for and the module. Details will be made available in advance through induction, the course handbook, the module specification and the assessment timetable. The details are subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

Normally, a module will have 4 learning outcomes, and no more than 2 items of assessment. An item of assessment can comprise more than one task. The notional workload and the equivalence across types of assessment is standardised.

Calculation of the Final Award

The class of Honours awarded in Bachelor’s degrees is usually determined by calculation of an aggregate mark based on performance across the modules at Levels 5 and 6, (which correspond to the second and third year of full-time attendance).

Level 6 modules contribute 70% of the aggregate mark and Level 5 contributes 30% to the calculation of the class of the award. Classification of integrated Master’s degrees with Honours include a Level 7 component. The calculation in this case is: 50% Level 7, 30% Level 6, 20% Level 5. At least half the Level 5 modules must be studied at the University for Level 5 to be included in the calculation of the class.

All other qualifications have an overall grade determined by results in modules from the final level of study. In Master’s degrees of more than 200 credit points the final 120 points usually determine the overall grading.

Academic profile

The University employs over 1,000 suitably qualified and experienced academic staff - 59% have PhDs in their subject field and many have professional body recognition.

Courses are taught by staff who are Professors (25%), Readers, Senior Lecturers (18%) or Lecturers (57%).

We require most academic staff to be qualified to teach in higher education: 82% hold either Postgraduate Certificates in Higher Education Practice or higher. Most academic staff (81%) are accredited fellows of the Higher Education Academy (HEA) - the university sector professional body for teaching and learning. Many academic and technical staff hold other professional body designations related to their subject or scholarly practice.

The profiles of many academic staff can be found on the University’s departmental websites and give a detailed insight into the range of staffing and expertise. The precise staffing for a course will depend on the department(s) involved and the availability and management of staff. This is subject to change annually and is confirmed in the timetable issued at the start of the course.

Occasionally, teaching may be supplemented by suitably qualified part-time staff (usually qualified researchers) and specialist guest lecturers. In these cases, all staff are inducted, mostly through our staff development programme ‘First Steps to Teaching’. In some cases, usually for provision in one of our out-centres, Recognised University Teachers are involved, supported by the University in suitable professional development for teaching.

Figures correct for academic year 2019-2020.

Belfast campus

A globally recognised hub of creativity, innovation and entrepreneurship.


Accommodation

High quality apartment living in Belfast city centre adjacent to the university campus.

Find out more - information about accommodation  


Student Wellbeing

At Student Wellbeing we provide many services to help students through their time at Ulster University.

Find out more - information about student wellbeing  


Belfast campus location info

  Find out more about our Belfast campus

Address

Ulster University
York Street
Belfast
County Antrim
BT15 1ED

T: 028 7012 3456

Modules

Here is a guide to the subjects studied on this course.

Courses are continually reviewed to take advantage of new teaching approaches and developments in research, industry and the professions. Please be aware that modules may change for your year of entry. The exact modules available and their order may vary depending on course updates, staff availability, timetabling and student demand. Please contact the course team for the most up to date module list.

Year one

Engineering Mathematics

Year: 1

This module provides an understanding of the language and terminology of mathematics, together with the mathematical techniques from algebra, calculus and statistics that are necessary for the description and analysis of engineering systems.

Introduction to Mechanical Engineering

Year: 1

This module will introduce students to studying Mechanical Engineering at Ulster University and will develop some of the foundational knowledge and skills that will enable them to succeed on their degree programme.

Design and CAE 1

Year: 1

This module provides an introduction to the fundamentals in the use of a modern 3D CAD system to create robust 3D part modules using an introductory range of feature types. This module provides an introduction to product design specification, design, build and analysis/testing of a product as part of a design project, working as part of a team.

Mechanical Systems & Analysis 1

Year: 1

Analysis of statics and dynamics systems are a key foundation for mechanical and mechatronic engineers. This module provides fundamental concepts and principles in order to solve static and dynamics problems, and gives a solid methodology and framework in order to tackle new and unfamiliar problems.

Its content includes: Basic and derived units, static equilibrium, statically stressed systems, theory of torsion and bending, kinematics of a particle and kinetics of a particle. Those theoretical and practical principles required within each topic area will be developed in lectures and applied in assignments and tutorials.

The Global Engineer

Year: 1

This module will introduce students to working in multidisciplinary teams to solve a real-world problem and present their solution to an audience of their tutors and peers.

Materials and Manufacturing 1

Year: 1

A module which integrates lectures with practical sessions in the study of the basics of common manufacturing methodologies and the behaviour of engineering materials. The student will consolidate their learning of the interaction among materials, manufacturing methods, quality and workshop safety. Production of a working electro-mechanical product will deepen knowledge and develop basic skills for selected manufacturing processes. Candidates will critique their work to improve the product design and select appropriate production processes for batch manufacture.

Year two

Design of Electro-Mechanical Systems

Year: 2

The understanding of electrical power systems, AC and DC motors including selection, performance and analysis; plus their relevance to mechanical drive systems.

Mechanical Systems and Analysis 2

Year: 2

This module provides an extension of the fundamental principles of Dynamics and Statics and Strength of Materials in relation to mechanical engineering and provides a methodology for their practical application.

Materials and Manufacturing 2

Year: 2

The module uses a blended approach to provide a sound understanding of the underpinning chemistry and microstructure of metals, ceramics, polymers and composites. How materials properties are controlled by processing techniques and the environmental impact of materials is also considered. In addition, a programme of industrial visits exposes students to a wide variety of production scenarios and processes.

Quality and Operations

Year: 2

The module teaches the basics of Operations and Quality. The Operations elements looks at the processes that produce the goods and services sold by the company in addition to optimising facility location and layout. The module also teaches topics such as stock control and scheduling.

The Quality part of the module covers the relevance and application of Quality principles and techniques to the manufacturing environment. Discussion of current topics in Quality Management and Quality Improvement is supported by study of the fundamentals of ISO 9001, Statistical Process Control, Measurement System Analysis and Non-Destructive testing. This module prepares the student to contribute to these challenging activities in their early employment.

Thermal Fluid Sciences

Year: 2

This module provides an introduction to the principles behind fluid mechanics and thermodynamics. Emphasis is placed on the application of this theory to everyday items, ranging from relatively simple devices such as pumps, pipes, bicycles, refrigerators and heating systems through to internal combustion engines, hydroelectric power stations, gas turbines and steam engines.

An understanding of how fluids flow, and the forces that result, along with knowledge of energy and how it can be transformed and made more useful are the intended outcomes of this module. It will enable students to continue their study of thermal fluid sciences at a higher level if desired.

Design and CAE 2

Year: 2

The module considers creativity in design; product innovation; technical and non-technical aspects of design; sustainability; design analysis techniques for economic product manufacture and assembly; functional analysis; visual design; value engineering; safety and reliability through design projects; manufacturing processes; assembly techniques; market intelligence; component and product inspection and testing. This module builds on the fundamentals of 3D solid part modelling with the introduction of more advanced solid modelling tools, assembly modelling, creation of 2D drawings and incorporation of all these tools and features within a design project, working as part of a team.

Year three

Industrial Placement

Year: 3

This module is optional

This module provides undergraduate students with an opportunity to gain structured and professional work experience, in a work-based learning environment, as part of their planned programme of study. This experience allows students to develop, refine and reflect on their key personal and professional skills. The placement should significantly support the development of the student's employability skills, preparation for final year and enhance their employability journey.

International Academic Studies

Year: 3

This module is optional

This module provides an opportunity to undertake an extended period of study outside the UK and Republic of Ireland. Students will develop an enhanced understanding of the academic discipline whilst generating educational and cultural networks.

Year four

Control for Mechanical Engineers

Year: 4

This module provides an understanding of the theoretical concepts and use of feedback-control systems in mechanical engineering.

Design and Industrial Applications 3

Year: 4

This module is based on the execution of an industrially generated major design project through multi-disciplinary team activity involving aspects of: project management, market analysis, specification, concept design, budget costing, decision making, detail design, production planning, manufacturing requirements and product costing.

Mechanical Systems and Analysis 3

Year: 4

This course provides students with an understanding of how solid engineering respond to different types of loading factors. For this, theoretical and practical principles required in static, dynamic and FEA disciplines will be taught in lectures and applied in assignments, laboratory sessions and tutorials. These will allow students to assess and deliver a solution for a variety of practical mechanical systems.

German for International Engineering

Year: 4

This introductory module is to equip students with a basic linguistic competence and give them confidence in their own language learning abilities. The teaching methods aim at encouraging learner autonomy at the crucial early stages of language acquisition. The research on aspects of contemporary German society is to tune the students' sensitivity to another culture

Functional Biomaterials

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module provides students with a detailed understanding of the composition, function and application of synthetic and natural biomaterials in the context of the medical implant devices they are used to fabricate. The approach taken highlights the important materials science issues involved in the provision of these systems. The increasing importance of functional biomaterials to the provision of enhanced medical implant devices that can more effectively replace damaged and/or diseased tissues and organs is also addressed.

Nanotechnology

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module gives the student an overview of nanotechnology and its applications in engineering.

Control and Automation

Year: 4

This module is optional

The module is offered in Germany and covers theoretical and practical aspects of modern process automation concepts.

Mechatronics

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module is offered in Germany and covers the theoretical and practical aspects of mechatronics, control and simulation techniques for micro-mechanical systems combined with electronics and bonding technologies to connect both.

Microeconomics

Year: 4

This module is optional

The module is offered in Germany and covers the incentives and decision making processes of different market participants. Students learn to use economic concepts in order to evaluate the consequences of current economic developments for making decisions.

Environmental Engineering

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module introduces environmental issues, key aspects and provides coverage of science, technology, design, regulations and management systems pertaining to environmental protection, resource conservation and alternative energy sources.

Manufacturing technology

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module involves the technology of fixed automation; computer numerical control; materials handling; low cost automation; computer integrated manufacturing; industrial robot technology; robot applications; automated inspection and advanced robotics.

MEMS Materials and System Simulation

Year: 4

This module is optional

The module is offered in Germany and covers theoretical and practical aspects of modern MEMS concepts.

Advanced CAE

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module provides a practical, hands-on experience of Computer Aided Engineering in the context of industrial design and manufacturing. It focuses on advanced part modelling techniques, assembly modelling, creating associative links, good modelling practice, collaboration and interoperability, design documentation, 3D printing, surface modelling, photorealistic rendering, dynamic simulation and Finite Element Analysis. It involves the utilisation of an integrated, state-of-the-art MCAD suite, along with the teaching of the general principles of the aforementioned technologies.

Year five

Research Methods and Management

Year: 5

A module which integrates lectures with group activities in the study of the basics of research methods and management processes. The student will consolidate their learning of research methodologies, management processes, data processing, literature review, report and dissertation making.

MEng Final Year Dissertation

Year: 5

This module is designed to equip students with the appropriate research and project management skills needed to complete an MEng level project and prepares them to be able to contribute positively in their first engineering graduate employment.

An ethos of professionalism can be developed and demonstrated in the way that earlier learned material can be successfully applied in engineering applications; this can continue after graduation and is an essential requirement of a practising Chartered Engineer.

Students are expected to design the project in collaboration with their supervisor. They will be responsible for carrying out the project and writing up and presenting their work in the form of an oral/poster presentation and a final written dissertation.

Advanced Thermal Fluid Sciences and CFD

Year: 5

This module in thermal fluid sciences covers external flow, turbulence and heat transfer and an introduction to CFD modelling and

Micro- & Nano-Scale Devices

Year: 5

This module is optional

The course provides an in depth knowledge of micro-nanodevices, as well as micro and nanofabrication techniques using elements from nanoscience and nanotechnology.

Entrepreneurship and Innovation Engineering

Year: 5

This module is optional

To provide participants with the capability to improve the competitiveness of companies through entrepreneurship practice and new product and/or process innovation. A major team design project is addressed derived from a real problem from within a local/global manufacturing company. Material covered is supported through tutorial, lecture and workshop sessions as appropriate.

Intelligent Manufacturing

Year: 5

This module is optional

Two of the most important developments in manufacturing in the 21st century are Additive Manufacturing and the 4th Industrial Revolution (Industrie 4.0). In this module, students will be introduced to these two strands of advanced manufacturing and will develop the skills and knowledge to engage with these concepts in an industrial context.

Manufacturing systems

Year: 5

This module is optional

This module provides a concise review of modern manufacturing, time compression methodologies and current manufacturing systems - their specification, implementation and development. The flow of data within a product lifecycle is analysed from design through to manufacture and the effective utilisation of advanced manufacturing technology addressed.

Quality Improvement

Year: 5

This module is optional

This module considers modern approaches to Quality Improvement. The context of product or service is set for the interpretation of Quality from different perspectives. The Quality topics are considered under the themes of definition, measurement, actions, improvement and control. Modern and traditional management approaches are evaluated and techniques appropriate to product or service characteristics and organisation performance are considered.

Computer Aided Engineering for Managers

Year: 5

This module is optional

This module provides a concise and application based overview of current computer aided engineering systems by providing a detailed summary of current rapid-prototyping and manufacturing processes, multi-axis advanced manufacturing technologies, digital inspection and simulation. The application of CAE to enhance the product lifecycle will be the fundamental objective of this module. The integration of these systems from new product introduction (NPI) through to digital inspection will be addressed.

Polymer Technology

Year: 5

This module is optional

At the end of the module the student should be able to critically appraise alternative thermoplastic conversion and fabrication processing routes. Through analysis of processing behaviour, they should be capable of developing appropriate strategy for selection of conversion routes for a range of representative material systems and applications in terms of total economics and quality enhancement.

Composite Engineering

Year: 5

This module is optional

At the end of the module the student should have acquired a high level of competence the many facets of composite materials and their processing methods leading to an active role as a member of a Production Management or Research team. The student should have the ability to select between competing 'composite' technologies for specific applications and hence be in a position to devise conversion systems and associated quality assurance procedures, having regard to maximising cost effectiveness and product reliability.

Standard entry conditions

We recognise a range of qualifications for admission to our courses. In addition to the specific entry conditions for this course you must also meet the University’s General Entrance Requirements.

A level

The A Level requirements are grades ABB to include Mathematics and one from GCE A Level Physics, Chemistry, Technology & Design, Design & Technology, Engineering or Electronics.

Desirable Subject Offer - GCE A Level Physics.
Applicants presenting A Level Physics will receive a one grade reduction at the time of offer i.e. BBB.

Applied General Qualifications

The Faculty of Computing, Engineering and the Built Envionment accept a range of alternative combinations of qualifications:

BTEC Extended Awards
BTEC Level 3 QCF Extended Diploma in Engineering with overall award profile D*DD to include a Distinction in a unit of Further Mathematics for Engineering Technicians and Distinction in Mechanical Principles for Engineering Technicians.

OR

BTEC Level 3 RQF National Extended Diploma in Engineering with DDM overall award grades to include a Distinction in Engineering Principles and Distinction in Further Engineering Mathematics.

A Levels with;
BTEC Level 3 QCF Subsidiary Diploma;
BTEC RQF National Extended Certificate in Engineering. Note: Must include Merit in Engineering Principles and accepted only when presented with an additional Merit in Calculus to Solve Engineering Problems.
BTEC Level 3 QCF 90-credit Diploma
BTEC Level 3 RQF National Foundation Diploma does not satisfy the subject requirement for this course and will only be considered when presented with A Levels in the specified subjects;
BTEC Level 3 QCF Diploma or BTEC Level 3 RQF National Diploma.

The A level(s) and/or the BTEC qualification(s) must be in the specified subject(s) and must have the required modules.

OCR Nationals and Cambridge Technical Combinations
Do not satisfy the subject entry requirement for this course and will be accepted as grade only when presented with A levels in the relevant subjects.

​For further information on the entry requirements for this course please contact the administrator as listed in the Contact section below.

Entry equivalences can also be viewed in the online prospectus at http://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/entrance-requirements/equivalence

Irish Leaving Certificate

128 UCAS Tariff points to include a minimum of four subjects at Higher Level and one subject at Ordinary Level. English Grade H6 or above (HL) or Grade 04 or above (Ordinary Level) if not sitting at Higher Level. Higher Level subjects must include Mathematics and one other Higher Level subject from Physics, Chemistry, Physics/Chemistry, Biology, Technology, Engineering, Technology and Design.

Irish Leaving Certificate UCAS Equivalency

Scottish Highers

The Scottish Highers requirement for this course is BBBBC (to include minimum of BB in Mathematics and another science subject).

Scottish Advanced Highers

The Scottish Advanced Highers requirement for this course is BBC (to include Mathematics and a science subject).

International Baccalaureate

Overall International Baccalaureate Diploma requirement for this course is a minimum of 27 points to include 13 at Higher Level and to include minimum grade 6 in Higher Level Mathematics and grade 5 in another Higher Level science subject. Grade 4 in English Language also required in overall profile.

Access to Higher Education (HE)

MEng entry is not available directly from an Access course.

GCSE

GCSE Mathematics Grade C, 4 or above
GCSE English Language Grade C, 4 (or equivalent).
NOTE:
All applicants presenting BTECs as the subject require Distinction in all relevant Maths modules

English Language Requirements

English language requirements for international applicants
The minimum requirement for this course is Academic IELTS 6.0 with no band score less than 5.5. Trinity ISE: Pass at level III also meets this requirement for Tier 4 visa purposes.

Ulster recognises a number of other English language tests and comparable IELTS equivalent scores.

Additional Entry Requirements

HND, HNC, Foundation and OCR/Cambridge Technical do not satisfy the subject entry requirements to this course.

The General Entry Requirements must also be met including English Language minimum GCSE grade C (or equivalent). Please check the following link http://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/entrance-requirements#ger

Exemptions and transferability

Students who have successfully completed studies equivalent in content and level to year 1 modules may be considered for direct entry to Year 2.

United States of America flagAdditional information for students from United States of America

Undergraduate

Each programme will have slightly different requirements, both in terms of overall points and certain subjects, so please check the relevant subject in the undergraduate on-line prospectus.

Normally Ulster University welcomes applications from students with:

Generally, for undergraduate courses for international applicants we require equivalent to A-Level CCC, for these courses the entry requirements will be one of the following:

Qualification

  • Qualification High School diploma with overall GPA 3.0 and 1000 out of 1600 in SAT (Post March 2016)
  • High School Diploma with overall GPA 3.0 and grades 3,3,3 in 3 AP subjects
  • High School Diploma with overall GPA 3.0 and 580 in 3 subject specific SAT tests
  • High School Diploma with overall GPA 3.0 and 26 in ACT
  • Associate Degree with GPA 3.0

Please note that some courses will have subject specific entry requirements, please check the relevant course entry requirements in the undergraduate on-line prospectus. If there is a subject specific requirement you will be required to get 580 in the Subject Specific SAT or Grade 3 in the Subject Specific AP test.

Some courses may also have additional entry criteria, such as a Skype interview, submission of a satisfactory portfolio, criminal record check or health check, please check the relevant course entry requirements in the undergraduate on-line prospectus.

For courses that require GCSE Mathematics Grade C, you will be required to successfully complete Grade 12 in High School Diploma Mathematics.

Some courses have higher entry requirements, please see list below;

BSc Hons Optometry

(A-level ABB to include 2 science subjects from Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics and Physics or equivalent)

Qualification

To include one of the following:

  • High School Diploma with overall GPA 3.0 and grades 5,4,4 in 3 AP subjects to include 2 science subjects
  • High School Diploma with overall GPA 3.0 and 1200 out of 1600 in SAT and 650 in 2 subject specific SAT, to include 2 science subjects
  • High School Diploma with overall GPA 3.0 and 28 in ACT and 2 AP subjects grades 4,4, to include 2 science subjects
  • Associate Degree with GPA 3.2 in an appropriate science subject
    In addition to both of the following:
  • Successful completion of Grade 12 High school Diploma English and Mathematics
  • A satisfactory criminal record check and health screening

MPharm Pharmacy

(A-Level BBB to include Chemistry and 1 science from Mathematics, Physics or Biology or equivalent)

Qualification

To include one of the following:

  • Qualification High School Diploma with overall GPA 3.0 and grades 4,4,4 in 3 AP subjects to include Chemistry and one other science
  • High School Diploma with overall GPA 3.0 and 1200 out of 1600 in SAT and 630 in 2 subject specific SAT to include Chemistry and one other science
  • High School Diploma with overall GPA 3.0 and 28 in ACT and 2 AP subjects Grades 4,4 to include Chemistry and 1 other science
  • Associate Degree with GPA 3.2 in an appropriate science subject
    In addition to both of the following:
  • Successful completion of Grade 12 High school Diploma English and Mathematics
  • A satisfactory criminal record check and health screening

BSc Hons Nursing (Adult) and BSc Hons Nursing (Mental Health)

(A-Level BBC or equivalent)

Qualification

To include one of the following:

  • High School Diploma with overall GPA 3.0 and grades 4,4,3 in 3 AP subjects
  • High School Diploma with overall GPA 3.0 and 1150 out of 1600 in SAT (Post March 2016)
  • High School Diploma with overall GPA 3.0 and 600 in 3 Subject Specific SAT tests
  • High School Diploma with overall GPA 3.0 and 28 in ACT
  • Associate Degree with GPA 3.1
    In addition to all of the following:
  • Successful completion of Grade 12 High school Diploma English and Mathematics
  • A satisfactory Skype interview
  • A satisfactory criminal record check and health screening

Financial Information

In addition to the scholarships and bursaries open to all international students, US students may apply for Federal and Private US loans

English Language

English Language Requirement
Qualification
Level 12 English Lang in HSD

View more information for students from United States of America  

Careers & opportunities

Graduate employers

Graduates from this course are now working for:

  • B E Aerospace
  • Caterpillar
  • CDE Global
  • Jaguar Land Rover
  • Mallaghan Engineering
  • Seagate Technology
  • Terex

Job roles

With this degree you could become:

  • Aero Space Stress Engineer
  • Design Engineer
  • Manufacturing & Quality Engineer
  • Materials and Processes Engineer
  • Project Engineer
  • Quality Engineer

Career options

Job prospects in a broad range of engineering industries are excellent with most graduates finding employment within six months of graduation. Graduates with an MEng in Mechanical Engineering, first class or upper second class award satisfy the entry requirements for a wide range of postgraduate research posts and scholarships in mechanical engineering, engineering materials and manufacturing engineering.

Work placement / study abroad

The industrial placement year is a significant, formative period for our student mechanical engineers. Involvement in the practice of engineering in an industrial setting will develop your engineering, transferable and personal skills and significantly enhance your employability on graduation. All students are therefore required to undertake a (paid) industrial work placement - normally in year 3 of the programme.

In addition, students can select to study for a semester in the University of Applied Sciences in Augsburg which is in the Bavarian region of Germany. This study abroad period is normally in semester 2 of year 4.

Professional recognition

Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET)

Accredited by the Institution of Engineering and Technology on behalf of the Engineering Council for the purposes of fully meeting the academic requirement for registration as a Chartered Engineer.

Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE)

Accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) on behalf of the Engineering Council for the purposes of fully meeting the academic requirement for registration as a Chartered Engineer.

Apply

Applications to full-time undergraduate degrees at Ulster are made through UCAS.

Start dates

  • September 2022

Contact

Course Director: Dr Alan Brown

T: +44 (0)28 9036 8814

E: a.brown@ulster.ac.uk

Admissions Contact: Sharon Crawford

T: +44 (0)28 9036 6218

E: s.crawford@ulster.ac.uk

Admissions Service:

T: +44 (0)28 9036 6309

E: admissionsjn@ulster.ac.uk

For more information visit

Disclaimer

  1. The University endeavours to deliver courses and programmes of study in accordance with the description set out in this prospectus. The University’s prospectus is produced at the earliest possible date in order to provide maximum assistance to individuals considering applying for a course of study offered by the University. The University makes every effort to ensure that the information contained in the prospectus is accurate but it is possible that some changes will occur between the date of printing and the start of the academic year to which it relates. Please note that the University’s website is the most up-to-date source of information regarding courses and facilities and we strongly recommend that you always visit the website before making any commitments.
  2. Although reasonable steps are taken to provide the programmes and services described, the University cannot guarantee the provision of any course or facility and the University may make variations to the contents or methods of delivery of courses, discontinue, merge or combine courses and introduce new courses if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Such circumstances include (but are not limited to) industrial action, lack of demand, departure of key staff, changes in legislation or government policy including changes, if any, resulting from the UK departing the European Union, withdrawal or reduction of funding or other circumstances beyond the University’s reasonable control.
  3. If the University discontinues any courses, it will use its best endeavours to provide a suitable alternative course. In addition, courses may change during the course of study and in such circumstances the University will normally undertake a consultation process prior to any such changes being introduced and seek to ensure that no student is unreasonably prejudiced as a consequence of any such change.
  4. The University does not accept responsibility (other than through the negligence of the University, its staff or agents), for the consequences of any modification or cancellation of any course, or part of a course, offered by the University but will take into consideration the effects on individual students and seek to minimise the impact of such effects where reasonably practicable.
  5. The University cannot accept any liability for disruption to its provision of educational or other services caused by circumstances beyond its control, but the University will take all reasonable steps to minimise the resultant disruption to such services.