Human Nutrition with placement year - BSc (Hons)

2025/26 Full-time Undergraduate course

Award:

Bachelor of Science with Honours

Faculty:

Faculty of Life and Health Sciences

School:

School of Biomedical Sciences

Campus:

Coleraine campus

UCAS code:

B400
The UCAS code for Ulster University is U20

Start date:

September 2025

With this degree you could become:

  • Graduate Trainee
  • Health Improvement Practitioner
  • nutritional consultant
  • Project Manager
  • quality manager
  • Scientist
  • Nutritionist

Graduates from this course are now working for:

  • Abbott Nutrition
  • Glanbia
  • Kellogg
  • Lackpatrick Dairies
  • Randox Laboratories
  • Health and Social Care trusts

Overview

Passionate about diet and health? Gain the skills that will help you have an impact on health and well-being of society with this accredited course.

Summary

Nutritionists draw out, disseminate and then apply the knowledge learned from the relevant sciences with the aim of promoting an understanding of the effects of diet on growth, development, health and wellbeing.

This course aims to provide you with a comprehensive education in nutrition science and the related biosciences and their application to the maintenance of human health and in public health domains, the prevention of disease.

The 2023 Guardian University Guide ranks Ulster No. 1 for Nutrition and Food Sciences in
the UK. The course is also consistently highly rated in the National Student Survey (NSS) with Human Nutrition programme achieving 93% overall satisfaction in 2023.

We’d love to hear from you!

We know that choosing to study at university is a big decision, and you may not always be able to find the information you need online.

Please contact Ulster University with any queries or questions you might have about:

  • Course specific information
  • Fees and Finance
  • Admissions

For any queries regarding getting help with your application, please select Admissions in the drop down below.

For queries related to course content, including modules and placements, please select Course specific information.

We look forward to hearing from you.

About this course

About

Human nutrition is the scientific study of the foods we eat, the nutrients in foods, the fate of the nutrients when they are eaten and the effect of diet on health and well-being. Human nutrition, therefore, includes the study of the science of nutrition, the supportive sciences of chemistry, biochemistry, physiology, anatomy, pathology, food science, epidemiology and statistics, together with the newer biosciences such as genetics and immunology. If you successfully complete the programme, you graduate with a BSc Hons Human Nutrition and a Diploma in Professional Practice (DPP) or Diploma in Professional Practice International (DPPI) or a Diploma in International Academic Studies (DIAS) depending on your placement choice. As a graduate nutritionist you will have the skills to elicit, disseminate, and apply knowledge drawn from the relevant sciences to promote an understanding of the effects of diet on human health and well-being.

We are delighted that the Course continues to receive a high Overall Student Satisfaction in the National Student Survey.

Associate awards

Diploma in Professional Practice DPP

Diploma in International Academic Studies DIAS

Diploma in Professional Practice International DPPI

Attendance

This is a four year full-time course.

Start dates

  • September 2025

Teaching, Learning and Assessment

This is a full time course. Students engage in lectures, seminars and tutorials. These are accompanied by practical sessions to enable the student to gain a deeper understanding of the taught academic materials.

Students are assessed using a range of methods including course work, presentations, group work, project initiation and development through critical appraisal of literature and undertaking research including writing a research dissertation in final year.

Attendance and Independent Study

The content for each course is summarised on the relevant course page, along with an overview of the modules that make up the course.

Each course is approved by the University and meets the expectations of:

  • Attendance and Independent Study

    As part of your course induction, you will be provided with details of the organisation and management of the course, including attendance and assessment requirements - usually in the form of a timetable. For full-time courses, the precise timetable for each semester is not confirmed until close to the start date and may be subject to some change in the early weeks as all courses settle into their planned patterns. For part-time courses which require attendance on particular days and times, an expectation of the days and periods of attendance will be included in the letter of offer. A course handbook is also made available.

    Courses comprise modules for which the notional effort involved is indicated by its credit rating. Each credit point represents 10 hours of student effort. Undergraduate courses typically contain 10, 20, or 40 credit modules (more usually 20) and postgraduate courses typically 15 or 30 credit modules.

    The normal study load expectation for an undergraduate full-time course of study in the standard academic year is 120 credit points. This amounts to around 36-42 hours of expected teaching and learning per week, inclusive of attendance requirements for lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical work, fieldwork or other scheduled classes, private study, and assessment. Teaching and learning activities will be in-person and/or online depending on the nature of the course. Part-time study load is the same as full-time pro-rata, with each credit point representing 10 hours of student effort.

    Postgraduate Master’s courses typically comprise 180 credits, taken in three semesters when studied full-time. A Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) comprises 60 credits and can usually be completed on a part-time basis in one year. A 120-credit Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) can usually be completed on a part-time basis in two years.

    Class contact times vary by course and type of module. Typically, for a module predominantly delivered through lectures you can expect at least 3 contact hours per week (lectures/seminars/tutorials). Laboratory classes often require a greater intensity of attendance in blocks. Some modules may combine lecture and laboratory. The precise model will depend on the course you apply for and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. Prospective students will be consulted about any significant changes.

  • Assessment

    Assessment methods vary and are defined explicitly in each module. Assessment can be a combination of examination and coursework but may also be only one of these methods. Assessment is designed to assess your achievement of the module’s stated learning outcomes.  You can expect to receive timely feedback on all coursework assessments. This feedback may be issued individually and/or issued to the group and you will be encouraged to act on this feedback for your own development.

    Coursework can take many forms, for example: essay, report, seminar paper, test, presentation, dissertation, design, artefacts, portfolio, journal, group work. The precise form and combination of assessment will depend on the course you apply for and the module. Details will be made available in advance through induction, the course handbook, the module specification, the assessment timetable and the assessment brief. The details are subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

    Normally, a module will have 4 learning outcomes, and no more than 2 items of assessment. An item of assessment can comprise more than one task. The notional workload and the equivalence across types of assessment is standardised. The module pass mark for undergraduate courses is 40%. The module pass mark for postgraduate courses is 50%.

  • Calculation of the Final Award

    The class of Honours awarded in Bachelor’s degrees is usually determined by calculation of an aggregate mark based on performance across the modules at Levels 5 and 6, (which correspond to the second and third year of full-time attendance).

    Level 6 modules contribute 70% of the aggregate mark and Level 5 contributes 30% to the calculation of the class of the award. Classification of integrated Master’s degrees with Honours include a Level 7 component. The calculation in this case is: 50% Level 7, 30% Level 6, 20% Level 5. At least half the Level 5 modules must be studied at the University for Level 5 to be included in the calculation of the class.

    All other qualifications have an overall grade determined by results in modules from the final level of study.

    In Masters degrees of more than 200 credit points the final 120 points usually determine the overall grading.

    Figures from the academic year 2022-2023.

Academic profile

The University employs over 1,000 suitably qualified and experienced academic staff - 60% have PhDs in their subject field and many have professional body recognition.

Courses are taught by staff who are Professors (19%), Readers, Senior Lecturers (22%) or Lecturers (57%).

We require most academic staff to be qualified to teach in higher education: 82% hold either Postgraduate Certificates in Higher Education Practice or higher. Most academic and learning support staff (85%) are recognised as fellows of the Higher Education Academy (HEA) by Advance HE - the university sector professional body for teaching and learning. Many academic and technical staff hold other professional body designations related to their subject or scholarly practice.

The profiles of many academic staff can be found on the University’s departmental websites and give a detailed insight into the range of staffing and expertise.  The precise staffing for a course will depend on the department(s) involved and the availability and management of staff.  This is subject to change annually and is confirmed in the timetable issued at the start of the course.

Occasionally, teaching may be supplemented by suitably qualified part-time staff (usually qualified researchers) and specialist guest lecturers. In these cases, all staff are inducted, mostly through our staff development programme ‘First Steps to Teaching’. In some cases, usually for provision in one of our out-centres, Recognised University Teachers are involved, supported by the University in suitable professional development for teaching.

Figures from the academic year 2022-2023.

Coleraine campus

Accommodation

A laid-back campus at the heart of a global tourist attraction.

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Sports Facilities

Our Campus in Coleraine boasts a variety of indoor and outdoor facilities that are open all year round to students and members of the public.

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Student Wellbeing

At Student Wellbeing we provide many services to help students through their time at Ulster University.

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Modules

Here is a guide to the subjects studied on this course.

Courses are continually reviewed to take advantage of new teaching approaches and developments in research, industry and the professions. Please be aware that modules may change for your year of entry. The exact modules available and their order may vary depending on course updates, staff availability, timetabling and student demand. Please contact the course team for the most up to date module list.

Year one

Biochemistry

Year: 1

This module is designed to introduce students to the fundamental biochemical pathways, an understanding of which are necessary for the further study of life and health sciences. The structure, function and metabolism of biological macromolecules and the regulation of the pathways involved in their metabolism are discussed in detail

Human Physiology & Anatomy

Year: 1

This module provides an introduction to the study of human physiology and anatomy to underpin further study of the pathophysiology in health and disease.

Medical Cell Biology

Year: 1

This module will enable students to develop an understanding of the cellular basis of life and the relevance of studies of cell structure and function at the molecular level to human disease. In addition, it will provide a foundation for further studies in genetics, microbiology, histology and biochemistry.

Chemistry and Pharmacology

Year: 1

This module introduces general descriptive, physical, organic and inorganic chemistry and the principles underlying chemical properties and reactions of simple organic and inorganic compounds with applications to pharmacology.

Practical and Laboratory Skills

Year: 1

This module aims to provide students with the basic skills and techniques required to work safely in a laboratory setting, which underpins further study and practice in the life and health sciences.

Fundamentals of Nutrition Science

Year: 1

This module introduces the basic scientific concepts of human nutrition, health psychology theories related to diet and physical activity behaviours and provides a general introduction to learning in a university setting, including scientific information retrieval, and handling. It also introduces the basic statistical methods essential to scientific analysis and informs on the use of specific software packages for the analysis and presentation of data. Employability and professionalism are also introduced within this module. Teaching methods include lectures, computer laboratory classes and tutorials.

Year two

Clinical biochemistry

Year: 2

This module is designed to provide an understanding in clinical biochemistry sufficient to underpin further study in the biomedical sciences.

Pathophysiology

Year: 2

This module is designed to provide understanding of key concepts in pathology sufficient to underpin further study in the biomedical sciences

Immunology

Year: 2

This module is designed to provide students with an understanding of the key concepts in immunology sufficient to underpin further study in the biomedical sciences. Additionally, the module aims to foster critical thinking, independent research skills, and an appreciation for the relevance of immunology in various scientific and medical contexts. Ultimately, students completing this module should be well-prepared to comprehend, analyze, and engage with immunological concepts in both theoretical and practical settings.

Food science

Year: 2

The module provides an integrated overview of food science and technology across the food supply chain and in the context of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Core topics include principles of food processing, structure and chemistry of food components, elements of food microbiology and food safety hazards/risks. Students are introduced to the production and processing of the main food commodities, challenges in food (re)formulation and other factors for sustainable and ethical food quality, safety and security of supply. Students will engage and report on laboratory practicals, and will undertake a site visit to a local company to gain insights into the food production process.

Epidemiology and statistics

Year: 2

The module provides an opportunity for students to acquire necessary understanding of nutritional epidemiology and statistical analysis. Providing an integrated overview to the principles of epidemiology and its analysis and interpretation with respect to the study of diet and disease.

Assessment of Nutritional Status

Year: 2

This module is designed to promote an understanding of the fundamentals of nutritional assessment through directed learning on anthropometry, body composition and dietary assessment methodologies. Students will gain practical skills in the measurement and collection of anthropometry and dietary intake data.

Nutrition Through the Lifecycle

Year: 2

This module discusses the changing nature of nutritional requirements and determinants of food selection through the human life cycle.

Food and Nutrition Entrepreneurship

Year: 2

This module aims to provide nutrition students with the opportunity to develop entrepreneurial competences and transferable professional skills, applied to the current global challenges in food, nutrition and health. The module will be taught using a combination of lectures, seminars/tutorials and case studies, supported by online learning resources. Students will co-create and communicate an innovative and creative idea to solve a current food/nutrition problem or challenge. Collaborating in groups, selected ideas will be developed into an outline business plan.

Applied Genetics

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module considers genetic defects that contribute to human disease with study of recombinant DNA techniques, human inheritance, chromosomal aberrancies and inborn errors of metabolism, carcinogenesis and ageing. Practical experience of contemporary molecular biological techniques is also provided. Advances in molecular genetics and multi-omics are also discussed and provide an appreciation of the potential for improved diagnostics and therapeutics

Biosciences for Nutrition

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module introduces Nutrition students to the basic concepts of Pharmacology, Genetics and Microbiology, sufficient to underpin further study.

Food Production, Regulation and Innovation

Year: 2

This module is optional

Nutritionists have many pertinent roles within the food industry, from new product development to global food regulation. This module will give a basic introduction to topics such as food regulation, new product development, people in production and careers in the food industry and give students an insight to how nutrition is applied in the food industry. After reviewing the virtual food tours, students will complete a written assignment on a food production process, including an element of new product development and innovation. Students will gain practical experience in utilising e-books and other information sources in order to present a professional and concise written report aligned a set format.

Year three

Human Nutrition/Food and Nutrition Placement - Diploma in Professional Practice (DPP)

Year: 3

This module provides undergraduate students with an opportunity to gain structured and professional work experience, in a work-based learning environment, as part of their planned programme of study. This experience allows students to develop, refine and reflect on their key personal and professional skills. The placement should significantly support the development of the student's employability skills, preparation for final year and enhance their employability journey.

Human Nutrition / Food and Nutrition Placement -Diploma in International Academic Studies (DIAS)

Year: 3

This module provides an opportunity to undertake an extended period of study outside the UK and Republic of Ireland. Students will develop an enhanced understanding of the academic discipline whilst generating educational and cultural networks.

Year four

Health Promotion and Nutrition Communication

Year: 4

This module provides a broad overview of the concepts of health, health belief, health promotion and behavioural change and the sociological factors that influence that food related behaviour. It focuses on strategies for planning and evaluation of current health promotion and nutrition education, the scientific evidence and consumer understanding of food and nutrition policies.

Biochemistry and Molecular Nutrition

Year: 4

This module discusses the biochemical roles of the essential nutrients in metabolism, the possible aetiologies of major chronic diseases together with postulated nutritional involvement in the disease mechanisms. In addition, the module also reinforces for students the concept of nutrigenomics and the role of nutrition at the molecular level.

Nutrition Research Methodology

Year: 4

This module provides an integrated overview of nutrition- and food-related research as the ongoing basis of the knowledge that informs future practice, research & development. The module provides an opportunity for students to acquire skills necessary to produce a critical review of scientific literature, conduct statistical analysis using relevant computer software and acquire presentation skills, which help to prepare students for the Food, Nutrition and Dietetics research project module (NUT517).

Food, Nutrition and Dietetics Research project

Year: 4

This module provides students with experience in research in a selected area of investigation in Food, Nutrition and Dietetics conducting an independent research project and interpreting the findings for presentation to a scientific audience in the form of scientific poster and scientific paper for publication.

Clinical & Molecular Genetics

Year: 4

This module is optional

The module considers in depth, key areas of genetics and introduces specialised topics based on recent advances and current considerations in the human and molecular genetics field. The application of available genomic/SNP data towards stratified and personalised medicine will be discussed.

Sport & Exercise Nutrition

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module provides an introduction to the biochemical principles of exercise and sport, the role of nutrition and exercise in the prevention of disease and the importance of nutrition in athletic performance.

Clinical Nutrition

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module discusses the aetiology, prevention, dietary management and treatment of common nutrition-related diseases and nutrition support.

Functional Foods and the Supply Chain

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module will provide students with an understanding of functional foods and components and the scientific and legal measures which are used throughout the food supply chain to ensure food produced is healthy and safe. An understanding of this topic is of vital importance for food and nutrition graduates who aspire to a career in the food industry.

Standard entry conditions

We recognise a range of qualifications for admission to our courses. In addition to the specific entry conditions for this course you must also meet the University’s General Entrance Requirements.

A level

BCC - including twoscience subjects

Subject Specific Requirement:

At least onefrom: Chemistry, Physics, Maths, Biology or Nutrition and Food Science

or


At least twofrom: Chemistry, Physics, Maths, Biology, Nutrition and Food Science, PE, Geography, IT, Single Award Applied Science, Health & Social Care, Environmental Technology/Science, Single Award Life & Health Science

Double Award Applied Science/Life & Health Science is acceptable as twoscience subjects.

Double Award Health & Social Care only accepted along with Chemistry, Physics, Maths, Biology or Nutrition and Food Science

Applied General Qualifications

Approved Science programmes only accepted - contact Admissions for further information

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma

Award profile of DMM (acceptable optional units 8 - 14, 17 - 22)

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Diploma

Award profile of DM (acceptable optional units 8 - 14, 17 - 22) plus A Level Grade C

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate

Award profile of M - accepted as a Group B Science subject (acceptable optional units 8 - 14) plus A Level Grades BC to include 1 one science subject from Group A.

Irish Leaving Certificate

104 UCAS tariff points from five subjects (four must be at Higher Level)

Subject Specific requirements - H3 & H4 in two science subjects:

At least onefrom: Chemistry, Physics, Maths, Biology, Home Economics

or

Twofrom: Chemistry, Physics, Maths, Biology, Home Economics, Agricultural Science, PE, Geography, IT

You must also have ILC Higher Level English grade H6 or above OR ILC Ordinary Level Grade O4. If Maths not achieved at H4, the minimum of H6 required at Higher Level or minimum of Grade O4 at Ordinary Level.

Irish Leaving Certificate UCAS Equivalency

Scottish Highers

BCCCC to include two science subjects - 2 from Group A OR 1 from Group A and 1 from Group B

Group A - Chemistry, Physics, Maths, Biology, Nutrition and Food Science
Group B - PE, Geography, IT, Applied Science, Health & Social Care, Environmental Technology/Science, Single Award Life & Health Science.

English & Mathematics required at Standard Level 1, 2 or 3

Scottish Advanced Highers

CDD to include CD in two science subjects - 2 from Group A OR 1 from Group A and 1 from Group B

Group A - Chemistry, Physics, Maths, Biology, Nutrition and Food Science
Group B - PE, Geography, IT, Applied Science, Health & Social Care, Environmental Technology/Science, Single Award Life & Health Science.

English & Mathematics required at Standard Level 1, 2 or 3

International Baccalaureate

24 points to include 12 points at higher level to include two subjects as follows:

2 from Group A OR 1 from Group A and 1 from Group B.

Group A – Chemistry, Physics, Maths, Biology or Home Economics

Group B – PE, Geography, IT, Applied Science

At least 6 points must be achieved in one of these subjects and at least 5 points in the second subject.

Higher or Subsidiary Level in English Language and Maths at Grade 4 or above.

Access to Higher Education (HE)

Pass science-based Access Programme with a minimum overall profile of 60% including a minimum of 60% in each level 3 module (NI Access Course)*

Pass sceince-based Access Programme with a minimum of 12 Credits at Distinction; 30 Credits at Merit and 3 credits at Pass (GB Access Course)*

* to include a 20 credit Level 2 Mathematics module, passed at 40% or successful completion of NICATS Mathematics as part of the pre-2021 Access Diploma.

GCSE

You must satisfy the General Entrance Requirements for admission to a first degree course and hold GCSE passes at grade C/grade 4 or above (or equivalent) in English Language, Maths and Double Award Science. GCSE Chemistry grade C/grade 4 can be accepted as an alternative to GCSE double award science.

Please note that for purposes of entry to this course the Level 2 Essential / Key Skill in Application of Number is NOT regarded as an acceptable alternative to GCSE Maths.

English Language Requirements

English language requirements for international applicants
The minimum requirement for this course is Academic IELTS 6.5 with no band score less than 6.0. Trinity ISE: Pass at level III also meets this requirement for Tier 4 visa purposes.

Ulster recognises a number of other English language tests and comparable IELTS equivalent scores.

Additional Entry Requirements

Acceptable alternative qualifications include:

Pass HND with overall Merit to include 30 distinctions in level 5 credits/units may be specified.

Pass HNC with overall Merit to include 60 distinctions in level 4 credits/units may be specified.

You may also meet the course entry requirements with combinations of different qualifications to the same standard as recognised by the University (provided subject requirements as noted above are met).

For further information regarding combination offer requirements, please contact Admissions Office staff on T: +44 (0) 28 7012 3210 or E: admissionsce@ulster.ac.uk

As part of your course you may have a placement/project that involves contact with patients and/or potential exposure to human blood/tissue. At that time you will be asked to complete a Health Declaration Form which will include information about your vaccination history.
Following screening of your form, it may be necessary for you to meet with a nurse or for a medical to be arranged with the University Occupational Health Physician. Depending on the exact nature of your placement/project you may require immunity from Measles, Mumps, Rubella, Chicken pox and Tuberculosis and/or have completed a course of Hepatitis B vaccinations with subsequent positive serology results.
You will be advised further should the need for health screening and vaccination arise.

Exemptions and transferability

At the discretion of the Course Committee, and the agreement of the Course Director, you may, in some circumstances, transfer to other courses within the School of Biomedical Sciences e.g.the BSc Hons Food and Nutrition with DPP/DPPI/DIAS or the BSc Hons Biology at the end of Year 1, even though the modules taken on these other programmes are not exactly the same as the Year 1 modules for the BSc Hons Human Nutrition course.

Students with good passes in HND Science (Applied Biology or Chemistry with Biology) or who have a Foundation degree in Medical and Applied Science may be permitted entry into Year 2.

Students holding the BSc (Ord) Health Science and Physiology, from Sligo Institute of Technology, with an overall average of 65% will be considered for direct entry to final year.

Careers & opportunities

Graduate employers

Graduates from this course are now working for:

  • Abbott Nutrition
  • Glanbia
  • Kellogg
  • Lackpatrick Dairies
  • Randox Laboratories
  • Health and Social Care trusts

Job roles

With this degree you could become:

  • Graduate Trainee
  • Health Improvement Practitioner
  • nutritional consultant
  • Project Manager
  • quality manager
  • Scientist
  • Nutritionist

Career options

The academic content of the programme, together with the experience gained from placement, leads to excellent employment opportunities within industry, nutrition research, health promotion, public health, personalised nutrition ie in the areas of metabolomics, nutrigenomics or in nutrition overseas. Many of our graduates choose to pursue higher degrees in the area of human nutrition or to complete a PGCE and become teachers of science, home economics or biology. Graduates may also pursue dietetics at postgraduate level by undertaking a postgraduate programme in Dietetics (e.g. PgDip/MSc Dietetics).

Work placement / study abroad

The compulsory placement takes place in Year 3 of the course. This experience equips our students for the workplace and consolidates nutrition knowledge and skills acquired during the first two years of the course.

In the placement module, structured work experience in the field of nutrition research, health education and promotion or the food industry helps students to appreciate the discipline and demands of the workplace and consolidate nutrition knowledge and skills acquired during the first two years of the course. The placement also provides the opportunity for the development of individual maturity, self-awareness and confidence as well as assisting students to assess their career direction.

There are 3 potential awards given for the successful completion of the placement year. Diploma in Professional Practice (DPP), Diploma in Professional Practice International (DPPI) or Diploma in International Academic Studies (DIAS). The award given depends on the location and nature of the placement.

Professional recognition

Association for Nutrition (AfN)

Accredited by the Association for Nutrition (AfN) for the purpose of eligibility for Direct Entry Registration at Associate Level with the UK Voluntary Register of Nutritionists (UKVRN).

Apply

Start dates

  • September 2025

Fees and funding

Scholarships, awards and prizes

All first year and second year Food and Nutrition students who achieve a year average of 70% or above will be placed on the 'Deans List'.

In year two, we have a sponored award for 'Best overall performance in year 2'.

In year four, we have industry sponsored awards for the 'Best overall performance in final year' and 'Best final year research project'.

Additional mandatory costs

Current costs of the health screening and vaccination programme are approx. £35 - 155 depending on the vaccinations required.

It is important to remember that costs associated with accommodation, travel (including car parking charges) and normal living will need to be covered in addition to tuition fees.

Where a course has additional mandatory expenses (in addition to tuition fees) we make every effort to highlight them above. We aim to provide students with the learning materials needed to support their studies. Our libraries are a valuable resource with an extensive collection of books and journals, as well as first-class facilities and IT equipment. Computer suites and free Wi-Fi are also available on each of the campuses.

There are additional fees for graduation ceremonies, examination resits and library fines.

Students choosing a period of paid work placement or study abroad as a part of their course should be aware that there may be additional travel and living costs, as well as tuition fees.

See the tuition fees on our student guide for most up to date costs.

Contact

We’d love to hear from you!

We know that choosing to study at university is a big decision, and you may not always be able to find the information you need online.

Please contact Ulster University with any queries or questions you might have about:

  • Course specific information
  • Fees and Finance
  • Admissions

For any queries regarding getting help with your application, please select Admissions in the drop down below.

For queries related to course content, including modules and placements, please select Course specific information.

We look forward to hearing from you.


For more information visit

Disclaimer

  1. Although reasonable steps are taken to provide the programmes and services described, the University cannot guarantee the provision of any course or facility and the University may make variations to the contents or methods of delivery of courses, discontinue, merge or combine courses and introduce new courses if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Such circumstances include (but are not limited to) industrial action, lack of demand, departure of key staff, changes in legislation or government policy including changes, if any, resulting from the UK departing the European Union, withdrawal or reduction of funding or other circumstances beyond the University’s reasonable control.
  1. If the University discontinues any courses, it will use its best endeavours to provide a suitable alternative course. In addition, courses may change during the course of study and in such circumstances the University will normally undertake a consultation process prior to any such changes being introduced and seek to ensure that no student is unreasonably prejudiced as a consequence of any such change.
  1. The University does not accept responsibility (other than through the negligence of the University, its staff or agents), for the consequences of any modification or cancellation of any course, or part of a course, offered by the University but will take into consideration the effects on individual students and seek to minimise the impact of such effects where reasonably practicable.
  1. The University cannot accept any liability for disruption to its provision of educational or other services caused by circumstances beyond its control, but the University will take all reasonable steps to minimise the resultant disruption to such services.

Testimonials

Studying BSc Human Nutrition at Ulster University Coleraine has been a truly rewarding experience. The course exceeded any of my expectations, providing me with not only a comprehensive understanding of nutritional science but invaluable opportunities and enjoyable memories.

Not only have I been privileged enough to be taught by incredibly inspiring lecturers and researchers but I have also been given fantastic opportunities to broaden my personal and professional skills. Additionally, the range of modules available to Human Nutrition students at Ulster allowed me to tailor the program to my interests and enhance personal career prospects.