Interactive Computing

BSc (Hons)

2023/24 Full-time Undergraduate course

Award:

Bachelor of Science with Honours

Faculty:

Faculty of Computing, Engineering and the Built Environment

School:

School of Computing

Campus:

Belfast campus

UCAS code:

G450
The UCAS code for Ulster University is U20

Start date:

September 2023

With this degree you could become:

  • Designed and Developer
  • Full Stack Developer
  • Media Developer
  • Software Developer
  • UX UI Designer and Developer
  • Web Designer and Developer

Graduates from this course are now working for:

  • Blue Cubes Web Design
  • Citi Bank
  • Eyesparks
  • Kainos
  • Liberty IT
  • Rumble Labs
  • Sugar Rush Creative

Overview

Computing@Ulster - empowering the graduates of tomorrow through excellence in teaching, research and technology transfer.

Summary

The BSc Hons Interactive Computing course will provide you with a strong underpinning knowledge in programming, with an emphasis on the design and development of highly interactive computing systems, using advanced technologies to enhance the user experience.

You will learn skills that enable you to design, produce and maintain complex interactive systems in a range of commercial, creative, social and educational context.

During the course, you will develop a high level of practical, conceptual and aesthetic skills as well as the critical means to integrate them to solve real-world problems.

You will explore areas such as programming in Python and JavaScript, Interactive Web Authoring, Database Systems, Dynamic Web Authoring, Human-Computer Interaction, Computer Networks, Systems Security as well as Web Application Development and Full Stack Strategies and Development. You will also be able to select modules which align with state-of-the-art research or showcase current advances in computing such as Data Analytics, Artificial Intelligence, Pervasive Computing, Mobile Development, Big Data and Computer Vision.

Given the variety of applications of computing with a focus on user interaction and experience, there are jobs available in numerous fields for example software development, UX/UI design, software testing and web design and development.


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About this course

About

If you want to become a professional with expertise in the design and deployment of highly interactive computing and web-based systems, then you should consider this course.

Computing systems and the Web pervades every aspect of our day-to-day lives from the gadgets in our pockets to how we interact with others. Industry needs dynamic, enthusiastic graduates with interests across the full stack for web development.

Do I need to have studied Computing or Digital Technology at school or college?

A discipline with such diversity requires students with a variety of interests and backgrounds, therefore, you do not need to have studied Computing or Digital Technology, however, we will look for evidence of a passion and enthusiasm for this dynamic, fast-moving discipline.

Associate awards

Diploma in Professional Practice DPP

Diploma in International Academic Studies DIAS

Diploma in Professional Practice International DPPI

Attendance

This course lasts four years and includes a Professional Practice year or study abroad option.

New students are expected to attend a pre-semester induction. The course is delivered over two semesters (September to May) with a supplementary assessment period in August.

The taught element of the course is typically 22-24 hours per week (Monday to Friday) and timetabled sessions are supplemented by directed independent study and may require access to additional online tutorial and study material.

You undertake six modules in Year 1 covering subjects such as Programming - Python and Java, Database Systems, Computer Technologies, Interactive Web Authoring and systems software. You will also attend extended induction designed to ease your transition into the course.

In Year 2, additional core modules extend your skills in Dynamic Web Authoring, Human-Computer Interaction and Web Application Development as well as topics relevant to Professional Development, Software Development, Networks and Security.

In Year 3, you are expected to undertake a year’s work placement in the UK, Ireland, Europe or the USA.

After your placement year, you return to the University for a final year of academic study which consists of two taught compulsory modules which reflect the core themes of the course at an advanced level and two optional modules from a pool of 11 that include topics in the areas of data analytics, pervasive computing and software engineering. You also undertake a major project which involves the development of a solution to a substantial software-related problem.

Start dates

  • September 2023

Teaching, Learning and Assessment

The course is delivered using several teaching and learning methods including Lectures, Tutorials and Practical Laboratory Session.

Lectures are used to present and illustrate basic theory and fundamental principles and are normally supplemented by tutorials which elaborate on lecture content and provide opportunities for the student to use their problem-solving skill and to examine problem solutions in greater detail.

Practical Laboratory Classes enable the practical application of theoretical concepts, facilitating a deeper understanding of key topics. In programming laboratories, there is an emphasis on small group tutoring and support.

Modules are assessed through a wide variety of methods including class tests, logbooks, individual and collaborative coursework assignments, project dissertation, oral presentations and examinations.

The content for each course is summarised on the relevant course page, along with an overview of the modules that make up the course.

Each course is approved by the University and meets the expectations of:

Attendance and Independent Study

As part of your course induction, you will be provided with details of the organisation and management of the course, including attendance and assessment requirements - usually in the form of a timetable. For full-time courses, the precise timetable for each semester is not confirmed until near the start date and may be subject to change in the early weeks as all courses settle into their planned patterns. For part-time courses which require attendance on particular days and times, an expectation of the days of attendance will often be included in the letter of offer. A course handbook is also made available.

Courses comprise modules for which the notional effort involved is indicated by its credit rating. Each credit point represents 10 hours of student effort. Undergraduate courses typically contain 10- or 20-credit modules and postgraduate course typically 15- or 30-credit modules.

The normal study load expectation for an undergraduate full-time course of study in the standard academic year is 120 credit points. This amounts to around 36-42 hours of expected teaching and learning per week, inclusive of attendance requirements for lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical work, fieldwork or other scheduled classes, private study, and assessment. Part-time study load is the same as full-time pro-rata, with each credit point representing 10 hours of student effort.

Postgraduate Masters courses typically comprise 180 credits, taken in three semesters when studied full-time. A Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) comprises 60 credits and can usually be completed on a part-time basis in one year. A 120-credit Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) can usually be completed on a part-time basis in two years.

Class contact times vary by course and type of module. Typically, for a module predominantly delivered through lectures you can expect at least 3 contact hours per week (lectures/seminars/tutorials). Laboratory classes often require a greater intensity of attendance in blocks. Some modules may combine lecture and laboratory. The precise model will depend on the course you apply for and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. Prospective students will be consulted about any significant changes.

Assessment

Assessment methods vary and are defined explicitly in each module. Assessment can be via one method or a combination e.g. examination and coursework . Assessment is designed to assess your achievement of the module’s stated learning outcomes. You can expect to receive timely feedback on all coursework assessment. The precise assessment will depend on the module and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

Coursework can take many forms, for example: essay, report, seminar paper, test, presentation, dissertation, design, artefacts, portfolio, journal, group work. The precise form and combination of assessment will depend on the course you apply for and the module. Details will be made available in advance through induction, the course handbook, the module specification and the assessment timetable. The details are subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

Normally, a module will have four learning outcomes, and no more than two items of assessment. An item of assessment can comprise more than one task. The notional workload and the equivalence across types of assessment is standardised.

Calculation of the Final Award

The class of Honours awarded in Bachelor’s degrees is usually determined by calculation of an aggregate mark based on performance across the modules at Levels 5 and 6 (which correspond to the second and third year of full-time attendance).

Level 6 modules contribute 70% of the aggregate mark and Level 5 contributes 30% to the calculation of the class of the award. Classification of integrated Masters degrees with Honours include a Level 7 component. The calculation in this case is: 50% Level 7, 30% Level 6, 20% Level 5. At least half the Level 5 modules must be studied at the University for Level 5 to be included in the calculation of the class.

All other qualifications have an overall grade determined by results in modules from the final level of study. In Masters degrees of more than 200 credit points the final 120 points usually determine the overall grading.

Figures correct for academic year 2019-2020.

Academic profile

The teaching and support of the programme is provided by the academic staff in the School of Computing.

Academic staff in the School are qualified to teach in higher education with most of them holding at least a Postgraduate Certificate in Higher Education Practice. The majority of academic staff in the School (83%) are accredited fellows of the Higher Education Academy (HEA) – the university sector professional body for teaching and learning. Within the School of Computing courses are taught by staff who are Professors (20%), Readers/Senior Lecturers (32%) and Lecturers (48%). Graduate Demonstrators and contract research staff support the academic staff who teach on the course in laboratory classes and programming clinics across all the years in the course including final year project support.

The academic members of staff are active in a range of research areas that inform the modules in the course.

The University employs over 1,000 suitably qualified and experienced academic staff - 59% have PhDs in their subject field and many have professional body recognition.

Courses are taught by staff who are Professors (25%), Readers, Senior Lecturers (20%) or Lecturers (55%).

We require most academic staff to be qualified to teach in higher education: 82% hold either Postgraduate Certificates in Higher Education Practice or higher. Most academic staff (81%) are accredited fellows of the Higher Education Academy (HEA) by Advanced HE - the university sector professional body for teaching and learning. Many academic and technical staff hold other professional body designations related to their subject or scholarly practice.

The profiles of many academic staff can be found on the University’s departmental websites and give a detailed insight into the range of staffing and expertise.  The precise staffing for a course will depend on the department(s) involved and the availability and management of staff.  This is subject to change annually and is confirmed in the timetable issued at the start of the course.

Occasionally, teaching may be supplemented by suitably qualified part-time staff (usually qualified researchers) and specialist guest lecturers. In these cases, all staff are inducted, mostly through our staff development programme ‘First Steps to Teaching’. In some cases, usually for provision in one of our out-centres, Recognised University Teachers are involved, supported by the University in suitable professional development for teaching.

Figures correct for academic year 2021-2022.

Belfast campus

Accommodation

High quality apartment living in Belfast city centre adjacent to the university campus.

Find out more - information about accommodation  


Student Wellbeing

At Student Wellbeing we provide many services to help students through their time at Ulster University.

Find out more - information about student wellbeing  


Belfast Campus Location

Campus Address

Ulster University,
2-24 York Street,
Belfast
BT15 1AP

T: 02870 123 456

Modules

Here is a guide to the subjects studied on this course.

Courses are continually reviewed to take advantage of new teaching approaches and developments in research, industry and the professions. Please be aware that modules may change for your year of entry. The exact modules available and their order may vary depending on course updates, staff availability, timetabling and student demand. Please contact the course team for the most up to date module list.

Year one

Problem Solving for Computing

Year: 1

Computer programming is a fundamental skill expected of computing graduates. This module will introduce students to the foundational concepts of programming via Python that will be used as building blocks in future modules. Students will also develop and enhance their problem solving skills as an integral part of the module.

Introduction to Databases

Year: 1

Database management is a fundamental skill expected of Computing graduates. This module will introduce students to the fundamental concepts of database design, implementation, querying and management of relational database systems.

Client Side Development

Year: 1

This module will assume no prior experience in creating web pages and will introduce the design principles, structural elements and technical concepts that underpin web authoring.

Application of the technical concepts will be facilitated through the use of web authoring tools in practical sessions to enhance the technical skills for the creation and styling of interactive Websites.

Introduction to Physical Computing

Year: 1

The aim of this module is to provide an understanding of the underlying systems that support the applications software. The theoretical concepts covered are illustrated by considering their practical application in modern real-world solutions.

Computer Technology

Year: 1

This module will introduce students to the basic hardware components from which a computer system is constructed and the organisation of these components. The components of the computer system that are involved in the execution of a software program will be investigated, as will the main features of typical operating systems. The students will also gain an appreciation of the evolution of computer systems and will be introduced to problem solving using a digital logic and computer arithmetic.

Programming II (Javascript)

Year: 1

Computer programming is a fundamental skill expected of computing graduates. This module will introduce students to the object oriented concepts of programming that will be used as building blocks in future modules. Students will also develop and enhance their problem solving skills as an integral part of the module.

Year two

Human Computer Interaction

Year: 2

Human-Computer Interaction is an important topic given that there is a number of novel and emerging user interfaces being developed. More than ever, there are also user demands and expectations for intuitive and usable user interfaces. This module will provide a foundation for user experience researchers and analysts.

Computer Networking

Year: 2

Computer networks are at the core of relatively large and modern computing systems. This module aims to equip learners with the appropriate skills to appreciate, understand and employ the key technologies used by interconnected devices in any networks. The module introduces the students to the basics of the networking field including components, topologies, architectures, functions, services, protocols, and standardisation.

Managing Web Platforms and Content

Year: 2

This module is designed to make provide students with the core knowledge, understanding and practical skills to install configure and manage a web content management platform as well as understand and practically apply content marketing strategy theory and techniques for the managed site.

Asynchronous Server-Side Application Development

Year: 2

This module intends to introduce the students to asynchronous server-side Web technologies and applications. Students will have the opportunity to apply previously learnt Web programming skills to the development of novel applications, and further extend their knowledge scope towards emerging Web technologies and applications.

Professional Development

Year: 2

This module is intended to support students in developing the broad professional awareness necessary for seeking and obtaining employment.

Systems Security

Year: 2

This module introduces fundamental concepts related to computer system security. It presents a thorough discussion of the fundamental principles and technologies underpinning the field, covering concepts, terminology, layers, services, communications media and protocols. The module provides an understanding of computing systems security concerns and how they can be addressed and mitigated so that security considerations are taken into account, and embedded in organisations and IT projects planning and management. This includes the communications within networked applications, security issues and cryptographic fundamentals

Software Product and Process Management

Year: 2

The Software Product and Process Management module provides the opportunity for students to gain a sound theoretical understanding of contemporary product and process management techniques. There is also the opportunity to apply learning from within the module and from modules undertaken thus far while working cohesively and professionally as part of a software team towards the successful management and planning of software product that meets business needs.

Year three

Professional Practice - Computing

Year: 3

This module provides undergraduate students with an opportunity to gain structured and professional work experience, in a work-based learning environment, as part of their planned programme of study. This experience allows students to develop, refine and reflect on their key personal and professional skills. The placement should significantly support the development of the student's employability skills, preparation for final year and enhance their employability journey.

International Academic Studies

Year: 3

This module is optional

This module provides an opportunity to undertake an extended period of study outside the UK and Republic of Ireland. Students will develop an enhanced understanding of the academic discipline whilst generating educational and cultural networks.

Year four

Full-Stack Strategies and Development

Year: 4

This module will introduce the key concepts of full-stack development and the tools used to implement a full-stack strategy. Students will be able to use what they learn from this module to develop robust software including APIs, database architectures and front-end applications according to industry standards.

Computing Project

Year: 4

The Computing Project provides an opportunity to draw together learning from across the course, and to allow students to evidence their mastery of the academic content and of its application through professional practice. Through the opportunity to devise, manage and evaluate all aspects of work in addressing a significant challenge, students can gain independence and a deeper appreciation of their practice within the broader subject area and of its relationship to wider society.

Cloud Native Development

Year: 4

This module aims to explore a range of modern development and deployment concepts in the context of scalable and high performance computing services.

Within this module concepts such as cloud architectures, hosted technologies, scalable solutions and infrastructure will be explored. Additionally, advanced programming/development concepts facilitating high performance solution development will be examined.

Concurrent and Distributed Systems

Year: 4

This module is optional

A concurrent system in which a collection of programs can execute in an interleaved fashion has many features in common with a distributed system in which processes on independent computers co-operate across a network or internet. This module presents the fundamental concepts of both concurrent systems and distributed systems and introduces the various techniques that can be used to program them. It provides students with the foundations for using the technology in computer applications.

Software Reliability Engineering

Year: 4

This module is optional

The content of the module provides an overview of principles, steps, methods and tools in building more reliable software systems, and an in-depth treatment of formal requirements specification and formal verification phases, the role such phases play in reliable software development and techniques. The module considers a range of reliable software development models, formal requirement specification and verification techniques. Practical work will require students to apply these techniques in a range of problems domains.

Data Analytics

Year: 4

This module is optional

In the era of cloud computing and big data, this module will provide students with the theory and practical foundations for undertaking real world data analytics.

Software Quality and Engineering Management

Year: 4

This module is optional

There are many tools and techniques available for the imbuing and management of quality in software products and processes. A reflective software engineer should have an awareness of the range of techniques available. With a focus on the ability to model and quantify software quality, this module will introduce concepts, techniques and recent research in software engineering quality management as it applies to medium-to-large software products and processes.

Enterprise Networks

Year: 4

This module is optional

The module provides the student with a deep understanding of the underlying communication protocols of personal, local area networks, wide area networks and inter-networks. The emphasis is on network planning, design and management. Issues such as acceptable network performance, detection of faults, maintaining security and effective management are studied as these are key to the successful operation of businesses. The module will address state of the art protocols and network case studies and can provide (i) an up to date viewpoint of Enterprise Networks for business and (ii) an opportunity for fostering research ideas in this discipline.

Strategic Information Systems Management

Year: 4

This module is optional

Organisations in the 21st century have become increasingly information and knowledge based relying heavily on the use of Information Systems (IS) and Information Technology (IT). To add value, compete and remain competitive, in an increasingly global market, it is necessary to have a clear understanding of the strategic role of IS/IT in support of meeting business needs.

Internet of Things: Systems and Applications

Year: 4

This module is optional

IoT represents the technology development and advances of a whole raft of technologies such as advanced sensing technologies, wireless and mobile computing, pervasive computing, smart technologies, edge and cloud computing. IoT applications such as those built upon the conception of smart homes, smart cities, intelligent transport, service robots, smart cyber-physical systems, to name but a few, are the next generation of systems, products and services which will impact and shape the society and economy. The ultimate purpose of this module is to train students with the comprehensive knowledge and skillset, system-level views and broader perspectives of multi- or interdisciplinary subject areas, so that they can meet the technical needs and societal challenges when they go to labour markets.

Artificial Intelligence

Year: 4

This module is optional

The AI module is built on the foundations in mathematics, computing and programming. It covers logic based symbolic AI, knowledge representation and reasoning, introduction to machine learning paradigms and advanced learning methods of reinforcement and deep learning, and real-world applications in different human-AI interactions. The module will answer the following three questions: (1) how to formulate AI problems conceptually; (2) how to turn the conceptual formulations into algorithms; (3) how to develop AI-focused applications. The module will also consider societal and theoretical concerns raised while designing and deploying AI solutions regarding the ability of people to understand, interpret, control, and interact with AI-based systems.

Computer Vision

Year: 4

This module is optional

Computer Vision is an increasingly pervasive element of technology-based solutions in a range of applications, both standalone and distributed over the Internet, requiring an understanding of image and video processing fundamentals and how they are integrated with Machine Learning. This module seeks to develop the student's knowledge of Computer Vision by introducing techniques and tools that enable machines with a capacity to sense the world using visual data. The module also provides opportunities for the student to learn how to develop applications to solve Computer Vision tasks and to implement solutions using Computer Vision and Machine Learning software tools and libraries.

Interactive Computer Graphics

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module provides an overview of interactive computer graphics and animation including 2D and 3D graphics principles and technologies as well as animation theory, virtual reality and topics related to games programming/design which are key technologies in the interactive computing industries.

Standard entry conditions

We recognise a range of qualifications for admission to our courses. In addition to the specific entry conditions for this course you must also meet the University’s General Entrance Requirements.

A level

BBC; or

BCC including one Grade B in Mathematics/Physics/Chemistry/Software Systems Development/Computing (not IT/ICT)

Applicants offering qualifications as an alternative to A-levels will receive the equivalent reduction when those qualifications include a significant proportion of mathematics, software development and/or physical science.

Applied General Qualifications

QCF Pearson BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma / OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 Extended Diploma (2012 Suite)
Award profile of DDD

RQF Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma / OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 Extended Diploma (2019 Suite)
Award profile of DDD

RQF Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma / OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 Extended Diploma (2016 Suite)
Award profile of DMM

QCF Pearson BTEC Level 3 Diploma / OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 Diploma (2012 Suite)
Award profile of DM plus A Level Grade B

RQF Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Diploma / OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 Diploma (2019 Suite)
Award profile of DM plus A Level Grade B

RQF Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Diploma / OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 Diploma (2016 Suite)
Award profile of DM plus A Level Grade B

QCF Pearson BTEC Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma / OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 Introductory Diploma (2012 Suite)
Award profile of D plus A Level Grades BC

RQF Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate / OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 Extended Certificate (2019 Suite)
Award profile of D plus A Level Grades BC

RQF Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate / OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 Extended Certificate (2016 Suite)
Award profile of D plus A Level Grades BC

Irish Leaving Certificate

112 UCAS tariff points to include a minimum of five subjects (four of which must be at higher level) to include English and Maths at H6 if studied at Higher level or O4 if studied at Ordinary Level.

Irish Leaving Certificate UCAS Equivalency

Scottish Highers

Grades BBCCC. All subject areas considered.

Scottish Advanced Highers

Grades CCD. All subject areas considered.

International Baccalaureate

Overall profile of 25 points to include 12 at Higher Level to include grade 4 in HL Mathematics. Grade 4 in English Language also required in overall profile.

Access to Higher Education (HE)

Overall profile of 63% (120 credit Access) (NI Access Course) to include a Pass in NICATS Maths (level 2) or a Pass in Introductory Maths for Computing (level 2) or GCSE Mathematics grade C or 4 (or an alternative qualification acceptable to the University) for entry to year 1.

Overall profile of 15 Distinctions and 30 Merits (60 credit Access Course) (GB Access Course) to include GCSE Mathematics grade C or 4 (or an alternative qualification acceptable to the University)

GCSE

For full-time study, you must satisfy the General Entrance Requirements for admission to a first degree course and hold a GCSE pass at Grade C/4 or above in English Language and Mathematics (or equivalent).

Level 2 Certificate in Essential Skills - Communication will be accepted as equivalent to GCSE English.

Please note that for purposes of entry to this course the Level 2 Certificate in Essential Skills - Application of Number is NOT regarded as an acceptable alternative to GCSE Maths.

English Language Requirements

English language requirements for international applicants
The minimum requirement for this course is Academic IELTS 6.0 with no band score less than 5.5. Trinity ISE: Pass at level III also meets this requirement for Tier 4 visa purposes.

Ulster recognises a number of other English language tests and comparable IELTS equivalent scores.

Additional Entry Requirements

HNC
Pass HNC with overall Distinction in a relevant subject area for year 1 entry only to include distinctions in 75 Level 4 credits to include GCSE Mathematics grade C or 4 (or an alternative qualification acceptable to the University).

HND Year 1
Pass HND in any subject area. GCSE Maths Grade C/4 or an alternative Mathematics qualification acceptable to the University is also required.

HND Year 2
Pass HND with overall Merit in a relevant subject area. HND applications may be considered for year 2 entry where the curriculum sufficiently matches that of Ulster University full-time year 1 course. Applicants presenting an HND may also be required to complete a Python Bridging Module if being considered for advanced entry to year 2.
GCSE Maths Grade C/4 or an alternative Mathematics qualification acceptable to the University is also required.

Ulster Foundation Degree
Pass in Foundation Degree with an overall mark of 50%, and minimum 50% in all taught level 5 modules. Applicants must also have GCSE Mathematics at Grade C or 4. Applicants will normally be considered for year 2 entry to the linked Honours degree.

Exemptions and transferability

During the first year of the course, you may be permitted to transfer to the BSc Hons Computing Science, the BEng Hons Software Engineering or the BSc Hons Computing Technologies.

If you have successfully completed Year 1 or 2 of a similar honours degree, you may be permitted to join the course in Year 2 or 4.

Careers & opportunities

Graduate employers

Graduates from this course are now working for:

  • Blue Cubes Web Design
  • Citi Bank
  • Eyesparks
  • Kainos
  • Liberty IT
  • Rumble Labs
  • Sugar Rush Creative

Job roles

With this degree you could become:

  • Designed and Developer
  • Full Stack Developer
  • Media Developer
  • Software Developer
  • UX UI Designer and Developer
  • Web Designer and Developer

Career options

As a graduate with skills in the development of highly interactive systems, you will have many career opportunities available in a wide range of commercial and industrial organisations developing new software for the Web, as project managers or information management. This can be in the local industry or across the world.

Average salaries are often higher than those of other graduates and there are also opportunities for postgraduate study in computing, software development, artificial intelligence, IoT or a related area.

Work placement / study abroad

In Year 3 you undertake a year's work experience, in the UK, Ireland or Europe. You can also study in the USA. This leads to either the Diploma in Professional Practice for a placement year based in UK or Ireland; Diploma in Professional Practice (International) for a placement year based outside the UK or Ireland; or the Diploma in International Academic Studies if Year 3 is spent in study abroad such as in the USA.

Professional recognition

BCS, the Chartered Institute for IT

Accredited by BCS, the Chartered Institute for IT on behalf of the Engineering Council for the purposes of fully meeting the academic requirement for Incorporated Engineer and partially meeting the academic requirement for a Chartered Engineer.

BCS, the Chartered Institute for IT

Accredited by BCS, the Chartered Institute for IT for the purposes of fully meeting the academic requirement for registration as a Chartered IT Professional.

Apply

Start dates

  • September 2023

Fees and funding

2023/24 Fees

Fees for entry in 2023/24 have not yet been set. See our tuition fees page for the current fees for 2022/23 entry.

Scholarships, awards and prizes

A variety of scholarships, awards and prizes are available each year to reflect individual academic excellence in specific areas of study or across year groups.

Additional mandatory costs

It is important to remember that costs associated with accommodation, travel (including car parking charges) and normal living will need to be covered in addition to tuition fees.

Where a course has additional mandatory expenses (in addition to tuition fees) we make every effort to highlight them above. We aim to provide students with the learning materials needed to support their studies. Our libraries are a valuable resource with an extensive collection of books and journals, as well as first-class facilities and IT equipment. Computer suites and free Wi-Fi are also available on each of the campuses.

There are additional fees for graduation ceremonies, examination resits and library fines.

Students choosing a period of paid work placement or study abroad as a part of their course should be aware that there may be additional travel and living costs, as well as tuition fees.

See the tuition fees on our student guide for most up to date costs.

Contact

Dr Jose Santos - Course Director
T: +44 (0)28 9536 5913
E: ja.santos@ulster.ac.uk

Admissions Contact - Julie McKee
T: +44 (0)28 9536 5779
E: ji.mckee@ulster.ac.uk

International Admissions Office
E: global@ulster.ac.uk

For more information visit

Disclaimer

  1. The University endeavours to deliver courses and programmes of study in accordance with the description set out in this prospectus. The University’s prospectus is produced at the earliest possible date in order to provide maximum assistance to individuals considering applying for a course of study offered by the University. The University makes every effort to ensure that the information contained in the prospectus is accurate but it is possible that some changes will occur between the date of printing and the start of the academic year to which it relates. Please note that the University’s website is the most up-to-date source of information regarding courses and facilities and we strongly recommend that you always visit the website before making any commitments.
  2. Although reasonable steps are taken to provide the programmes and services described, the University cannot guarantee the provision of any course or facility and the University may make variations to the contents or methods of delivery of courses, discontinue, merge or combine courses and introduce new courses if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Such circumstances include (but are not limited to) industrial action, lack of demand, departure of key staff, changes in legislation or government policy including changes, if any, resulting from the UK departing the European Union, withdrawal or reduction of funding or other circumstances beyond the University’s reasonable control.
  3. If the University discontinues any courses, it will use its best endeavours to provide a suitable alternative course. In addition, courses may change during the course of study and in such circumstances the University will normally undertake a consultation process prior to any such changes being introduced and seek to ensure that no student is unreasonably prejudiced as a consequence of any such change.
  4. The University does not accept responsibility (other than through the negligence of the University, its staff or agents), for the consequences of any modification or cancellation of any course, or part of a course, offered by the University but will take into consideration the effects on individual students and seek to minimise the impact of such effects where reasonably practicable.
  5. The University cannot accept any liability for disruption to its provision of educational or other services caused by circumstances beyond its control, but the University will take all reasonable steps to minimise the resultant disruption to such services.