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PhD Study at INCORE

INCORE hosts to an active and vibrant group of research students at Jordanstown and Magee campus.

All researchers are offered personal desk-space for the duration of the projects and are invited to participate in the daily life of INCORE and the school, including seminars and other research events.

We have a number of annual opportunities available for funded research studentships:

Our annual PhD studentship competition, which runs between December and February each year. Projects relevant to the school will be listed on the doctoral colleage site when available.

The school is part of the prestigious ESRC-funded NINE DTP Doctoral Training  Partnership where it is possible to apply for studentships in ‘Conflict Security and Justice’ pathway of the competition as well as through the Social Policy and Social Work pathway.

There a number of studentships opportunities available depending on whether you have undergraduate, postgraduate or research methods experience.

The school is also part of an EU-funded research studentship scheme, COFUND, where between 2019 and 2020 we will be advertising for 4 international Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellows to join us to carry out world-class PhD research projects with us.

Contacts

Contact the School Postgraduate Tutor, Shane MacGiollabhui or Research Director Markus Ketola for more information on any of the above opportunities.

Hear from some of our PhD students:

Emily Stanton - PhD Researcher 

Having worked as a practitioner in the field of conflict transformation, mediation and trauma training for a number of years previously, I was particularly interested in pursuing research that had a practical application in the field.

Consequently, I was seeking a research supervisory team that could critically engage with my research question- focused on grassroots and civil society peacebuilding- by bringing not only academic expertise but practice experience working within deeply divided societies.

After careful consideration of its research supervisors, I chose INCORE above other equally excellent Universities.

My experience of pursuing a PhD at INCORE over the last several years has exceeded my already high expectations. Throughout the research process I found my supervisory team consistently supportive, extremely knowledgeable and academically rigorous.

Their disciplinary and interdisciplinary expertise spanned both local and international dimensions of peace-building and both challenged and supported my intellectual development.

Due significantly to this research environment, pursuing the PhD has been one of the most rewarding experiences of my life and as a result I can enthusiastically and unequivocally recommend INCORE and Ulster University.

 Paul Mullen 

Remembering better in a divided society: working with difficult heritage during the Decade of Centenaries.

The background to this PhD research is the contested nature of heritage in Northern Ireland during the period that has been called the Decade of Centenaries.

The Decade covers the centenaries of key events from 1912-23 including the First World War, The Easter Rising and the Partition of Ireland.

The purpose is to explore the approach that the Heritage Lottery Fund and its partners took in relation to negotiating this potentially challenging period of commemoration, and to understand the use and impact of the ‘Principles for Commemoration’ which were developed to help community-led commemorative projects.

Consideration will be given to the value of an ethically led approach to commemoration.