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Visual Law

Visual law explores how legal rights responsibilities and processes can be conveyed visually, in order to develop public legal education materials that are engaging, informative, jargon free, and easy to understand.

Our visual law project, focuses on an important research question: how can we innovative in order to make public legal education material simpler, more engaging and memorable?  

Findings from large-scale studies of legal need, have identified that the public generally has a poor understanding of their legal rights and responsibilities. This lack of knowledge has a demonstrable impact on how and how often an individual resolves a particular problem.

The internet provides a fertile source of information and advice, yet legal education content online often struggles to balance simplicity and depth. Further, it often underutilises the opportunities available for dynamic, interactive content.

Visual law seeks to resolve some of these issues, by exploring how legal material can be presented visually. It necessitates that designers engage with content from the perspective of the user; requires content to be focused around key messages; and demands a visual link that helps to engage audiences and provoke interest.

Our visual law project is an ongoing public engagement activity between:

Our ongoing outputs from the project are provided below. These outputs are made available under a Creative Commons license. If you are a public sector, charitable or educational organisation you can share and use these materials freely. We would encourage you to make use of these materials to promote public legal education and to help demonstrate the potential of visual law.

Do you have an idea for an animation or poster, or interactive content that you think might be useful? Get in touch with us!


Flexibility at Work

Aimed at the general public, this topic conveys the law as it relates to flexible working and provides guidance as to how one might go about exercising flexible working rights.

Created by students from the School of Art and the School of Law. Illustrations by Lydia Nelson, Animations by Rebecca Blair & Cassie Galloway, Legal Content by Legal Innovation Centre.

Understanding Social Media and the Employment Contract

Social media is a ubiquitous part of modern life, particularly for young people. What is not always appreciated is that social media can adversely affect the employment relationship. This content is aimed at young people and provides a lighthearted, engaging approach to reinforce the issues that can arise when using social media for a range of different employment related activities.

Created by students from the School of Art and the School of Law. Illustrations by Sonibha McAliden, Animations by Rebecca Blair & Cassie Galloway, Legal Content by Elena Ballesteros.

How to take an Employment Dispute to the Tribunal

This topic provides the public with an informative guide to taking employment disputes to the Tribunal. It is directed at the general public, and intended to simplify what can often be a complex and difficult procedural process to understand.

Created by students from the School of Art and the School of Law. Illustrations by Darragh Kelly, Animations by Rebecca Blair & Cassie Galloway, Legal Content by Maria-Therese McCann.