Summary

Languages are much more than merely their communicative function.They serve important symbolic and identity roles in societies which are emerging from conflict to peace. How a particular language is recognised and represented within the institutions of the state, in community settings and by the wider populace inevitably reflects wider political and cultural antagonisms. Language policies, therefore, can relate directly to wider processes of reconciliation or indeed to the continuation of conflict in supposed times of peace via cultural means. In other words, debates on language and identity can be used either to bring communities together or to polarise them.

This project will investigate the impact that language ideologies have in the context of post-conflict societies. In particular, this project should address the manner in which language rights and policies might be implemented in such regions, in particular drawing on the shifting discourses about languages and their relation to speakers’ and learners’ identities, and the impact that such changes might have on a language’s status in the public space, and the nature of the wider public’s relationship with that language.

Students, after discussion with their supervisor, may wish to carry out a study which addresses a number of language settings or concentrate primarily on one language, such as the Irish Language in Northern Ireland, within a strongly comparative context. This contact has been conditioned by political, economic, sociological and geographical issues, leading to Ireland’s indigenous language being reduced to minority language status, with a shrinking autochthonous speech community. This scenario warrants scrutiny, both in terms of seeking to track and understand the ongoing nature of language shift within this community, and to identify fit for purpose language planning initiatives that will protect Ireland’s linguistic diversity and seek to reverse the current decline. PhD projects are invited within this broad area that include both fieldwork and policy objectives.

The scope of such projects will include the development of new analytical frameworks for assessing current and historical efforts at language planning that are comprehensive i.e. attending to economic, cultural, linguistic, educational matters etc. Projects may include investigating policy initiatives to support linguistic diversity in post conflict societies and focus on the case of minority language provision in particular.


Essential criteria

  • To hold, or expect to achieve by 15 August, an Upper Second Class Honours (2:1) Degree or equivalent from a UK institution (or overseas award deemed to be equivalent via UK NARIC) in a related or cognate field.
  • A comprehensive and articulate personal statement
  • Clearly defined research proposal detailing background, research questions, aims and methodology
  • Research proposal of 2000 words detailing aims, objectives, milestones and methodology of the project

Desirable Criteria

If the University receives a large number of applicants for the project, the following desirable criteria may be applied to shortlist applicants for interview.

  • First Class Honours (1st) Degree
  • Masters at 65%
  • For VCRS Awards, Masters at 75%
  • Completion of Masters at a level equivalent to commendation or distinction at Ulster
  • Research project completion within taught Masters degree or MRES
  • Experience using research methods or other approaches relevant to the subject domain
  • Experience of presentation of research findings

Funding and eligibility

Vice Chancellors Research Studentship (VCRS)

  • The scholarship will cover tuition fees and provide a maintenance allowance of £15,609 per annum for three years (subject to satisfactory academic performance). The scholarship also provides £900 per annum as a research training support grant (RTSG) allocation.
  • Applicants who already hold a doctoral degree or who have been registered on a programme of research leading to the award of a doctoral degree on a full-time basis for more than one year (or part-time equivalent) are NOT eligible to apply for an award.

Vice-Chancellor’s Research Bursary (VCRB)

Part award (full-time PhD fees + 50% DfE level of maintenance grant + RTSG for 3 years).

This scholarship will cover full-time PhD tuition fees and provide the recipient with £7,750 maintenance grant per annum for three years (subject to satisfactory academic performance). This scholarship also comes with £900 per annum for three years as a research training support grant (RTSG) allocation to help support the PhD researcher.

Vice-Chancellor’s Research Fees Bursary (VCRFB)

Fees only award (PhD fees + RTSG for 3 years).

This scholarship will cover full-time PhD tuition fees for three years (subject to satisfactory academic performance). This scholarship also comes with £900 per annum for three years as a research training support grant (RTSG) allocation to help support the PhD researcher.

Department for the Economy (DFE)

  • The scholarship will cover tuition fees and provide a maintenance allowance of £15,609 per annum for three years (subject to satisfactory academic performance). The scholarship also provides £900 per annum as a research training support grant (RTSG) allocation.
  • To be eligible for the full scholarship, applicants must meet UK residency requirements. This means that you must have been resident in the United Kingdom for the full three year period before the first day of the first academic year of the course.
  • EU nationals who do not meet UK residency are eligible to apply for a fees only award which will cover tuition fees (no maintenance support is provided).
  • Non-EU nationals must be ‘settled’ in the UK by the closing date of the application or have been ordinarily resident in the UK for purposes other than study for the past three years in order to be eligible for an award.
  • Applicants who already hold a doctoral degree or who have been registered on a programme of research leading to the award of a doctoral degree on a full-time basis for more than one year (or part-time equivalent) are NOT eligible to apply for an award.

Due consideration should be given to financing your studies. Further information on cost of living


The Doctoral College at Ulster University


Reviews

Profile picture of Seanán Mac Aoidh

I'm from county Monaghan originally and I did my undergraduate degree and Masters in the Irish language in NUI Galway. For my doctoral study I carried out a research project on the performance and transmission of Irish language storytelling in Donegal in modern times and down to the current day.I am very glad that I undertook this PhD project. It was certainly the most challenging and intense piece of work that I have done in my life but as a learning opportunity and as a platform for launching into other areas of activity it was unbeatable. Those storytellers whom I was working with in Donegal formed the basis of this research and were beyond helpful. I learned a lot from them.Also, I couldn't have completed this work if it wasn't for the talented and supportive staff involved in teaching and research in the Irish language on the Belfast and Magee campuses. It was a real pity to see the downgrading and defunding of this staff's work in the Irish language and of their physical office

Seanán Mac Aoidh - PhD in Modern Languages and Linguistics


Profile picture of Michael Casey

Having enjoyed a teaching career in Co. Wexford, I decided it was time to pick up the pace and challenge myself. While I researched supervisors the length and breadth of the country, it became apparent very quickly that the Irish department at the University has a fantastic team of academics with a broad scope of research opportunities. I presented my project ideas and was very lucky to have secured a VCRS research scholarship to study at Ulster University. My project looked at the stylistic features in oral and written literature in a very well known Irish speaking family in the Donegal Gaeltacht. I spent a considerable amount of time burning the midnight oil at Magee Library analysing and coding Irish material. I was very lucky to have had the support of two fantastic supervisors, Prof Ailbhe Ó Corráin and Dr Peter Smith, who provided endless encouragement and support over the years. I would sincerely like to thank the Irish Department for their dedication in promoting Irish

Michael Casey - PhD in Modern Languages and Linguistics


Profile picture of Tricia Carr

I studied at undergraduate, masters and PhD level at Ulster University. I began my studies here in 2011, and have enjoyed my time at the university immensely. My proudest moment was without doubt completing my PhD and receiving such positive feedback from my Viva. Writing a doctoral thesis is a long and oftentimes difficult process, I am proud of myself for persevering, even when it seemed that I would never get to the end. I could not have gotten through this process without the understanding and support of my parents, husband and friends, who understood when I had to prioritise my research over time with them. My parents believed I could achieve anything, and my husband supported me through the highs and lows of doctoral research.My supervisors were an integral part in getting this piece of work over the line, Fionntán encouraged me in pursuing this line of research since my first semester in my undergraduate degree, and without he and Gearóid constantly reminding me I would see

Tricia Carr - PhD in Modern Languages and Linguistics


Profile picture of Margaret McDermott

Having enjoyed a teaching career for many years the opportunity to further my education presented itself in 2014 and I enrolled in Ulster University. I attended the Magee Campus in Derry and began a Master of Research programme. I graduated with distinction in 2016, but the journey did not end here. In September 2017, having secured a VCRS research scholarship, I enrolled as a full-time PhD researcher in Magee University. I embraced this new role with diligence and enthusiasm. My project was entitled Paidreacha Traidisiúnta, Dánta Diaga agus Stair na Comhaimsire: Lánléargas ar Mheon Spioradálta Chaitlicigh Uladh, ón Ochtú hAois Déag go dtí an Fichiú hAois (Traditional Prayers, Religious Poetry and Contemporary History: A Panorama of the Mindset of the Catholics of Ulster, from the Eighteenth Century to the Twentieth Century). This research was conducted through the lens of a thoroughgoing examination of a representative corpus of religious text in verse form that had its

Margaret McDermott - PhD in Modern Languages and Linguistics