Summary

Perioperative nursing has evolved from an assistant role to a discipline in its own right (McGarvey at al 2000). However, contemporary debate has focused on whether the perioperative role is nursing or technical and who the best person to perform that role should be. McGarvey (1998) reported that while perioperative nurses believed their role to be patient-centred, two thirds of them demonstrated medico-technical or administratively focused behaviours, being heavily influenced by triggers other than patients’ needs. Recent perioperative research has focused either on individual concepts (Susleck et al 2007; Rudolfsson at al 2007) or on rating scales (Rauta et al 2012). The challenge with perioperative care (and research thereof) is drawing on both components: patient care and the wider contextual dimensions that seem influence care delivery. These two stances can be succinctly captured within a person-centred Practice Framework (McCormack and McCance 2017). Currently it is an underdeveloped area of research and while some global research is starting to emerge ( Bingham et al 2018: Shin and Kang 2019) studies within the UK are sparse. Person-centred approaches to care delivery have been increasingly promoted in international strategy and policy planning.

Healthcare Supervisors should note that all projects must have at least two Ulster University supervisors and that priority in the main competition will be given to projects which include one new supervisor on the team. In addition, individuals may only submit two Project Proposals for the main scholarship competition. Professions have had a stark reminder of the rights of patients to receive high quality, compassionate care (Francis Report 2013). In seeking a positive way forward, it has been previously argued that person-centred cultures have the capacity to make a critical difference to the care experience of both patients and staff (Pope, 2012). McCormack et al. (2011) suggest, however, that contextual factors such as organisational culture, pose the greatest challenge to person-centredness. Nowhere is this more relevant than in the perioperative environment where patients remain vulnerable and where contextual influences on patient-centred care have previously been identified as being problematic (McGarvey 1998).

Theoretical Framework

This study will be underpinned by the Person-Centred Practice Framework developed by McCormack and McCance (2017). This framework is now well established and has guided and structured studies that have focused on the development, implementation and evaluation of practice in a variety of contexts and care settings (Brown and McCormack 2011; McCance et al 2013; McConnell et al 2015).

The framework comprises four constructs: prerequisites focusing on attributes of staff; the care environment relating to the context in which care is delivered; care processes, and outcomes resulting from effective person-centred care. Research has shown that all constructs have the ability to influence on another across different settings.

Skills required of applicant:

1. Experience of using qualitative methods including interviews and focus groups.
2. Experience of managing qualitative and quantitative data.
3. Excellent computer literacy.
4. Excellent oral and written communication skills.
5. Registered Nurse on the live NMC register, desirable but not essential.


AccessNI clearance required

Please note, the successful candidate will be required to obtain AccessNI clearance prior to registration due to the nature of the project.


Essential criteria

  • To hold, or expect to achieve by 15 August, an Upper Second Class Honours (2:1) Degree or equivalent from a UK institution (or overseas award deemed to be equivalent via UK NARIC) in a related or cognate field.
  • Experience using research methods or other approaches relevant to the subject domain
  • Sound understanding of subject area as evidenced by a comprehensive research proposal
  • A comprehensive and articulate personal statement
  • Clearly defined research proposal detailing background, research questions, aims and methodology
  • A demonstrable interest in the research area associated with the studentship

Desirable Criteria

If the University receives a large number of applicants for the project, the following desirable criteria may be applied to shortlist applicants for interview.

  • First Class Honours (1st) Degree
  • Masters at 65%
  • Practice-based research experience and/or dissemination
  • Sound understanding of subject area as evidenced by a comprehensive research proposal
  • Relevant professional qualification and/or a Degree in a Health or Health related area

Funding

    The University offers the following awards to support PhD study and applications are invited from UK, EU and overseas for the following levels of support:

    Vice Chancellors Research Studentship (VCRS)

    Full award (full-time PhD fees + DfE level of maintenance grant + RTSG for 3 years).

    This scholarship will cover full-time PhD tuition fees and provide the recipient with £15,000 maintenance grant per annum for three years (subject to satisfactory academic performance). This scholarship also comes with £900 per annum for three years as a research training support grant (RTSG) allocation to help support the PhD researcher.

    Vice-Chancellor’s Research Bursary (VCRB)

    Part award (full-time PhD fees + 50% DfE level of maintenance grant + RTSG for 3 years).

    This scholarship will cover full-time PhD tuition fees and provide the recipient with £7,500 maintenance grant per annum for three years (subject to satisfactory academic performance). This scholarship also comes with £900 per annum for three years as a research training support grant (RTSG) allocation to help support the PhD researcher.

    Vice-Chancellor’s Research Fees Bursary (VCRFB)

    Fees only award (PhD fees + RTSG for 3 years).

    This scholarship will cover full-time PhD tuition fees for three years (subject to satisfactory academic performance). This scholarship also comes with £900 per annum for three years as a research training support grant (RTSG) allocation to help support the PhD researcher.

    Department for the Economy (DFE)

    The scholarship will cover tuition fees at the Home rate and a maintenance allowance of £ 15,009 per annum for three years. EU applicants will only be eligible for the fee’s component of the studentship (no maintenance award is provided). For Non-EU nationals the candidate must be "settled" in the UK. This scholarship also comes with £900 per annum for three years as a research training support grant (RTSG) allocation to help support the PhD researcher.

    Due consideration should be given to financing your studies; for further information on cost of living etc. please refer to: www.ulster.ac.uk/doctoralcollege/postgraduate-research/fees-and-funding/financing-your-studies


Other information


The Doctoral College at Ulster University


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