Summary

Evidence of both low dietary intakes of vitamin D, as well as poor vitamin D status is frequently reported in nationally representative population surveys. Preventing vitamin D deficiency is of vital public health importance due to its multifactorial roles in the human body, but most importantly for optimal musculoskeletal health. Our main source of vitamin D is endogenous synthesis following exposure to the UV-B light from the summer sun. With today’s modern lifestyles, however, it has become evident that this may not be an effective means of maintaining an adequate vitamin D status across the year. Therefore, we are reliant on topping up our body’s stores with food sources of vitamin D (both natural and fortified sources) and/or dietary supplements.

In 2011, the update of the Dietary Reference Intakes for calcium and vitamin D by the US Institute of Medicine prompted the re-evaluation of dietary reference values (DRV’s) for vitamin D in many other countries. Previously in the UK, there were no set DRV’s for vitamin D for the majority of the population (aged 4-64 years), as it was believed that adequate amounts could be synthesised from the sun. Such DRV’s were only in place for certain ‘at-risk’ groups, including infants/young children, elderly adults, and pregnant/lactating females (7-10µg/day). After considering the latest research, the Vitamin D Working Group of the UK’s Scientific Advisory Committee for Nutrition (SACN)(5) has recommended a Reference Nutrient Intake (RNI) for vitamin D of 10µg/day for everyone aged 4+ years. For infants (0-11 months) and children (1-4 years) old, a safe intake of 8.5–10µg/day has been advised.

Given the habitually low dietary intakes of vitamin D typically reported (2-4µg/day), and the generally low uptake of supplementation, it is clear that alternative food-based strategies are required to help the UK population meet these revised DRV’s. There is increasing evidence to support the role of vitamin D food fortification in maintaining or improving the vitamin D status of the consumer, and indeed, both mandatory policies and voluntary fortification practices are in place for a range of staple food products across the world. Emerging research, including studies lead by the current project team, have provided preliminary evidence on an innovative method to increase the vitamin D content of animal foods (pork, poultry, milk) by manipulating animal feeding and/or housing regimes. We are now ready to determine the effectiveness of these novel biofortification strategies as an innovative way to boost the vitamin D content of commonly consumed foods to help consumers meet the revised DRV’s for vitamin D.

This CAST award will involve four multidisciplinary and interrelated projects:

1.On-farm vitamin D biofortification of pork

2.Consumer acceptability of vitamin D-enriched meat products

3.Human trials designed to examine the bioavailability of vitamin D from the novel meat products (pork and poultry) and determine its efficacy to increase consumers’ vitamin D status

4.Dietary modelling to determine the efficacy of novel vitamin D-enriched meat products as a vehicle for vitamin D fortification in UK/Irish consumers


Essential criteria

  • To hold, or expect to achieve by 15 August, an Upper Second Class Honours (2:1) Degree or equivalent from a UK institution (or overseas award deemed to be equivalent via UK NARIC) in a related or cognate field.
  • Sound understanding of subject area as evidenced by a comprehensive research proposal
  • A comprehensive and articulate personal statement

Desirable Criteria

If the University receives a large number of applicants for the project, the following desirable criteria may be applied to shortlist applicants for interview.

  • First Class Honours (1st) Degree
  • Completion of Masters at a level equivalent to commendation or distinction at Ulster
  • Research project completion within taught Masters degree or MRES
  • Experience using research methods or other approaches relevant to the subject domain
  • Work experience relevant to the proposed project
  • Publications - peer-reviewed
  • Experience of presentation of research findings

Funding

This project is funded by: Devenish Nutrition Ltd Agri-Food & Biosciences Institute (AFBI)

The scholarship will cover tuition fees at the home rate and, for applicants with UK residence only, a maintenance allowance of not less than £15,480 per annum for three years. EU residents may also apply but if successful will receive fees only.


Other information


The Doctoral College at Ulster University


Reviews

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Kamin Hau - PhD in Biomedical Sciences


Profile picture of Kieran O'Donnell

My experience has been great and the people that I have worked with have been amazing

Kieran O'Donnell - 3D printing of biological cells for tissue engineering applications

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Profile picture of Michelle Clements Clements

Completing the MRes provided me with a lot of different skills, particularly in research methods and lab skills.

Michelle Clements Clements - MRes - Life and Health Sciences

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Profile picture of Sarah Craig

I completed my undergraduate studies at Ulster University, where I graduated in 2017 with first class honours in Biomedical Science with a Diploma in Professional Practice . I joined the Diabetes Research group as a PhD researcher in September 2017 and completed my PhD studies in June 2020.I am proud to say I not only completed my PhD studies within 3 years, but also became the World Champion (with a perfect score!) in Irish Dance during my PhD studies. My favourite memory was the opportunity to present my PhD work at the EASD conference in 2019. If I could speak to myself at the start of my PhD, the best piece of advice I would give myself would be to enjoy every single minute as the time flies in. I really would do another PhD!

Sarah Craig - PhD in Biomedical Sciences


Profile picture of Natalie Klempel

I completed my undergraduate studies in America at Texas Woman’s University where I majored in Kinesiology. I then moved to Scotland to successfully complete my Masters with Merit in Human Anatomy at the University of Dundee.My proudest moment was when I passed my viva! My favourite memory was …the dissections. I’ll never forget the friends I made and the good times we had together. I couldn’t have got through this without the support of my family, friends, lab colleagues, supervisors, and my boyfriend. If I could speak to myself at the start of my PhD, the best piece of advice I would give myself would be to write up after every experiment, keep a lot of back up copies of the work, and to enjoy the experience.

Natalie Klempel - PhD in Biomedical Sciences


Profile picture of Poonam Singh Nigam

I joined Ulster university in Jan 1990 after completing Postdoctoral research in Germany (1986-88) and PhD in India (1985). DSc degree in Applied Microbial-Biotechnology has been awarded after the evaluation of my thesis based on Research, Publication & related activities, completed as a research-active academic member of staff (1990-2019). DSc thesis summarised my scientific outputs and contributions (183 research papers, 3 biotechnology reference-books, 43 research-informed book-chapters, 26 research-informed review-articles, 90 conference-abstracts,1 European Patent and 2 Technology-transfers; Supervision of National & International researchers-18 Postdoctoral/Exchange and 12 PhD; and affiliations as Examiner of 58 PhD researchers globally, and Fellow & Member of nine scientific & academic societies.My message to all researchers is that "Chase your Aspirations and Never Give up". I couldn’t have got through my long academic & Professional journey without

Poonam Singh Nigam - DSc in Biomedical Sciences


Profile picture of Karl Smith

I started my PhD after I completed my undergraduate in Biology at Ulster University in 2016, with a dissertation project that focused on genetic variations in bacterial species. I continued using some of these techniques in my doctoral research, which primarily involved the investigation and development of mass spectrometry imaging in vitamin D treated prostate cancer, looking at the metabolic and genetic variations upon treatment. I worked with international collaborators at the University of Edinburgh and Maastricht University, where I got to learn and develop mass spectrometry techniques that have not previously been carried out in Northern Ireland. I now work as a postdoctoral researcher at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at Florida State University in Tallahassee, Florida, where I am helping to develop and implement a mass spectrometry imaging facility for users across the world with the super powerful 21T FT-ICR mass spectrometer.A PhD is a demanding process but when

Karl Smith - PhD in Biomedical Sciences


Profile picture of William Crowe

Throughout my PhD I’ve been provided with continuous support and guidance by my supervisors and the staff at the University.I’ve also received many opportunities to further enhance my professional development in the form of teaching experience and presenting my work at conferences which will aid in my pursuit of a career in academia or industry.

William Crowe


Profile picture of Ryan Kelsey

I graduated Ulster University in 2016 with a degree in Biomedical Science with DPP (Pathology). I was then offered a PhD studentship with Dr Catriona Kelly and Professor Neville McClenaghan at CTRIC which I started in September 2016. My PhD explored the pathophysiology of Cystic Fibrosis-Related Diabetes, the most common co-morbidity associated with Cystic Fibrosis.My proudest moment was undoubtedly passing my Viva (via Skype!), but I was also proud to be given the opportunity to present my work at the UK Cystic Fibrosis Trust Conference in 2018. Through this conference, I was able to meet with people with CF and the challenges they face which was important reminder that the research I was doing mattered. I couldn't have got through this without the unwavering support of my family, who were always there for me in the good times and the bad. I am also extremely grateful for the support and mentorship of my supervisors Dr Catriona Kelly, Professor Neville McClenaghan and Dr Dawood Khan

Ryan Kelsey - PhD in Biomedical Sciences


Profile picture of Ahmed Abuelhana

My proudest moment was when I knew the possibility of the full transfer of my PhD project to Ulster University, the University which I loved and started my first steps towards my PhD in, and also being a PhD graduate from one of the highly reputable universities such as Ulster is a big thing which I should always be proud of. I think there is no that word that can ever express my deepest thanks and sincere appreciation to my supervisor Professor Kathryn Burnett for her ideal supervision, valuable guidance, encouragement, generous help and ultimate support throughout my PhD project. I have been really lucky to have her as a supervisor. Also my deepest gratitude to Mr Linden Ashfield, Principal Clinical Pharmacist, Antrim Area Hospital (NHSCT) for his help and endless support throughout the whole research project. Also, I could not have got through this without the support of my beloved family (my father ”Sayed”, my mother ”Gamila”, my wife “Nermeen”

Ahmed Abuelhana - PhD in Biomedical Sciences


Profile picture of Ryan Lafferty

I graduated from Queen's University Belfast with a Master's in pharmacy in 2014 and subsequently began working as a community pharmacist in the Greater Belfast area. My career began to take an unusual turn when I got involved with a small startup company who developed a novel blood glucose monitor for diabetic patients. From here, my interest in diabetes was piqued and I applied for a PhD project (somewhat optimistically!) in the Diabetes Research Group at Ulster. Nearly four years later, I'm still there working as a postdoctoral researcher. Not bad considering I never thought I had a chance of getting a PhD spot!My time within the DRG has been, and still is, fantastic. I've made life-long friends (and surprisingly few enemies!) who have been patient, helpful and a joy to collaborate with. I couldn't have got through it without them (you know who you are). Likewise, the guidance from my supervisors, Prof. Peter Flatt and Dr. Nigel Irwin, has been invaluable. I'm probably most proud of

Ryan Lafferty - PhD in Biomedical Sciences