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Media Studies with English - BA (Hons) - Video

How mass media (TV, film, social media, advertising) is changing/questioning who we are.

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Overview

In this section

How mass media (TV, film, social media, advertising) is changing/questioning who we are.

Summary

The mass media have an extraordinary influence on our daily lives and the way we view each other and the world around us. Examination and understanding of the ways in which the press, broadcasting, cinema and new media work is essential for the modern global citizen.

The Media Studies programme explores the multi-faceted role that the media play in social, cultural and political life. It thereby addresses the vital need for a broad humanities education that thoroughly examines the modern media of public communication from a range of perspectives. As such, the programme will produce media-literate citizens, as well as graduates with a range of intellectual and transferable skills appropriate to the demands of life and work in contemporary society.

Students on the Major programme will take four Media modules in each academic year and will be required to undertake a final year dissertation.

English as a minor supplements your Major Subject by enabling you to progress from a broad awareness into a critically informed knowledge of English literature. The minor allows you to studying both English Literatures historical range and depth but also its contemporary examples.

International Students

If you don't meet our entry requirements for this course you may want to consider our International Foundation Programme (IFP)

The International Foundation Programme (IFP) will prepare you for studying an undergraduate degree at Ulster.

Find out more

Taking English as a Minor will allow you to develop a critically-informed knowledge of English literature in its historical range and depth. Through the study of literature across different genres, you will hone the ability to analyse text and form critical arguments, both in spoken and written form. A Minor in English comprises of two from the total of six modules you complete per year (three each semester). These draw on extensive staff expertise and internationally-recognised research. In addition to compulsory modules, you can pursue your own interests through a range of optional modules including 'Restoration & 18th-century Literature’ in second year, or 'Words in Freedom: Modernist Revolution in Literature’ in third year, among others. A Minor in English ensures you are well-equipped for the wide variety of careers that require advanced communicative skills, including publishing, journalism and the media, public relations, the creative arts, marketing and retail, arts administration, and many sectors of the civil service.

A Minor in English comprises of two from the total of six modules you complete per year (three each semester). These draw on extensive staff expertise and internationally-recognised research. In addition to compulsory modules, you can pursue your own interests through a range of optional modules including 'Restoration & 18th-century Literature’ in second year, or 'Words in Freedom: Modernist Revolution in Literature’ in third year, among others. A Minor in English ensures you are well-equipped for the wide variety of careers that require advanced communicative skills, including publishing, journalism and the media, public relations, the creative arts, marketing and retail, arts administration, and many sectors of the civil service.

Full-time students studying English as a Minor are expected to complete one third of their course studying the subject. Most modules offer 3 hours of teaching time per week (2 lectures and a seminar), plus additional contact time as required for tutorial consultation or general guidance. Independent reading and study, which will also be guided by module coordinators, is expected to occupy 13 hours per module per week. We endeavour to make lecture and seminar times convenient for those who have to travel far or who have part-time jobs.

English as a Minor in year 1 has two compulsory modules; ‘Elements of Criticism’ (Semester 1) and ‘Modes of Reading’ (Semester 2), designed to equip you with some basic tools of literary criticism and introduce important concepts of critical theory.

English as a Minor in year 2 offers a wide range of optional modules in year 2 drawing on staff research and scholarship. Depending on staff availability and compulsory requirements, students studying English as a minor subject can choose two modules (one in semester 1, one in semester 2) from the following modules: Early Modern English Culture, Modern Critical Theory, Rhymes of Passion: Love Poetry, Sex and the City of God, Writing the North, Restoration & 18th-century Literature, Romantic Narrative, Modern Poetry, Gender and Creativity, Beat Literature and Culture, Angels, Madwomen and Whores or Modern British Fiction.

English as a Minor in year 3 offers a wide range of optional modules in year 3 drawing on staff expertise, internationally recognised research and leading scholarship in the field. Depending on staff availability and compulsory requirements, students studying English as a minor subject can choose two modules (one in semester 1, one in semester 2) from the following modules: Words in Freedom: Modernist Revolution in Literature, Romantic Poetry and Theory, 19th-century American Literature, Adaptation and Historical Fiction, From the Vote to the Pill: Twentieth-century Women’s Writing, Twentieth-century Literature, The Victorian Novel, Twentieth-century American Literature, Body, Mind and Soul, Ulster-Scots Literary Tradition, Renaissance Drama 1485-1625

*Modules offered are dependent on staff availability and compulsory requirements.

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About this course

In this section

About

The mass media have an extraordinary influence on our daily lives and the way we view each other and the world around us. Examination and understanding of the ways in which the press, broadcasting, cinema and new media work is essential for the modern global citizen.

The Media Studies programme explores the multi-faceted role that the media play in social, cultural and political life. It thereby addresses the vital need for a broad humanities education that thoroughly examines the modern media of public communication from a range of perspectives. As such, the programme will produce media-literate citizens, as well as graduates with a range of intellectual and transferable skills appropriate to the demands of life and work in contemporary society.

Students on the Major programme will take four Media modules in each academic year and will be required to undertake a final year dissertation.

Taking English as a Minor will allow you to develop a critically-informed knowledge of English literature in its historical range and depth. Through the study of literature across different genres, you will hone the ability to analyse text and form critical arguments, both in spoken and written form. A Minor in English comprises 120 credits, made up of six modules per year (three each semester). These draw on extensive staff expertise and internationally-recognised research. In addition to compulsory modules, you can pursue your own interests through a range of optional modules including 'Restoration & 18th-century Literature’ in second year, or 'Words in Freedom: Modernist Revolution in Literature’ in third year, among others. A Minor in English ensures you are well-equipped for the wide variety of careers that require advanced communicative skills, including publishing, journalism and the media, public relations, the creative arts, marketing and retail, arts administration, and many sectors of the civil service. For more information on studying English at Ulster, view the course entry [http://study.ulster.ac.uk/prospectus/course/201415/1855] or contact Dr Tim Hancock, tel: 028 7012 4551, email: tc.hancock@ulster.ac.uk.

Structure & content

Media Studies is taught via lectures, screening and seminars. Students will take four modules each year from the list below and two from their minor subject.

Year 1
Media, Culture, Identity 1
Introduction to Hollywood Cinema
Media, Culture Identity 2
Photography and Visual Culture

Year 2
News and Journalism
History of Irish Photography
Television and Popular Culture
Mapping the City
Representation and Gender

Year 3
Film, Television and Ireland
Photography and the Mass Media
Irish and International DocumentaryResearch Methods
Written Dissertation
British Cinema
Reporting International Conflict
From the Archive to the Internet

Full-time students studying English as a Minor are expected to complete 120 credits usually broken into six modules per year: three in each semester. Most modules offer 3 hours of teaching time per week (2 lectures and a seminar), plus additional contact time as required for tutorial consultation or general guidance. Independent reading and study, which will also be guided by module coordinators, is expected to occupy 13 hours per module per week. We endeavour to make lecture and seminar times convenient for those who have to travel far or who have part-time jobs.

English as a Minor in year 1 has two compulsory modules; ‘Elements of Criticism’ (Semester 1) and ‘Modes of Reading’ (Semester 2), designed to equip you with some basic tools of literary criticism and introduce important concepts of critical theory.

You can take four modules from your main subject or 2 modules from your main subject and 2 from a third subject.

English as a Minor in year 2 offers a wide range of optional modules in year 2 drawing on staff research and scholarship. Depending on staff availability and compulsory requirements, students studying English as a minor subject can choose two modules (one in semester 1, one in semester 2) from the following modules: Early Modern English Culture, Modern Critical Theory, Rhymes of Passion: Love Poetry, Sex and the City of God, Writing the North, Restoration & 18th-century Literature, Romantic Narrative, Modern Poetry, Gender and Creativity, Beat Literature and Culture, Angels, Madwomen and Whores or Modern British Fiction.

English as a Minor in year 3 offers a wide range of optional modules in year 3 drawing on staff expertise, internationally recognised research and leading scholarship in the field. Depending on staff availability and compulsory requirements, students studying English as a minor subject can choose two modules (one in semester 1, one in semester 2) from the following modules: Words in Freedom: Modernist Revolution in Literature, Romantic Poetry and Theory, 19th-century American Literature, Adaptation and Historical Fiction, From the Vote to the Pill: Twentieth-century Women’s Writing, Twentieth-century Literature, The Victorian Novel, Twentieth-century American Literature, Body, Mind and Soul, Ulster-Scots Literary Tradition, Renaissance Drama 1485-1625.

*Modules offered are Dependant on staff availability and compulsory requirements.

Associate awards

Diploma in International Academic Studies DIAS

Find out more about placement awards

Attendance

Three years (full-time). Four to six years part-time.

Start dates

  • September 2018
How to apply

Modules

Here is a guide to the subjects studied on this course.

Courses are continually reviewed to take advantage of new teaching approaches and developments in research, industry and the professions. Please be aware that modules may change for your year of entry. The exact modules available and their order may vary depending on course updates, staff availability, timetabling and student demand. Please contact the course team for the most up to date module list.

In this section

Year one

Elements of Criticism

Year: 1

This module offers students a basic guide to literary criticism and interpretation, focusing upon the ways in which the formal structures of poetry, fiction and drama contribute to a diversity of effects and levels of meaning.

Modes of Reading

Year: 1

The module offers an introduction to the practice of reading and criticism. It aims to enable students to work with a variety of critical approaches, and to develop an informed awareness of the possibilities available to them as readers and critics.

Twentieth-Century Literature

Year: 1

The module is designed to introduce students to the history of English literature written during the twentieth century. It will focus, through the study of a selection of works by celebrated and representative writers of the period, on the major thematic preoccupations and formal diversity of modern literature in English, focusing in particular on the aesthetics of twentieth-century realism, modernism, and on post-modern developments.

Genres of Writing

Year: 1

This module is optional

ENG104 aims to assist students in improving the content, structure, and style of their writing in professional and creative writing genres, including academic and report writing, journalism, fiction, non-fiction, drama, and poetry. Covering generic, audience, and market requirements, the module focusses on methods and techniques that will enable students to make informed editorial choices based on insights into the craft and business of writing, and on the demands and expectations of readers, publishers, and employers.

Literature and Society in Ireland: An Introduction

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module provides a broad historical introduction to Irish Literature in English between the Act of Union (1800) and the Good Friday Agreement (1998). It will help students to build up a conceptual map of Irish literary history in English which is anchored to its proper socio-economic, political, historical and cultural contexts. It will also give due recognizance to the influence of the Irish language and Ulster-Scots literary traditions. Students will be able to read and examine key texts and collections from Maria Edgeworth to Robert McLiam Wilson.

Writing Matters

Year: 1

This module is optional

The module introduces students to various shorter literary genres (literature essay, short story, one-act play, autobiography/memoir, detective story, science writing, book review and other forms of journalism), exploring questions of genres, and examining key themes and issues that have 'mattered' to writers, and that have made writing 'matter' from the Renaissance to the present. Students will gain insight into insight into various literary eras, writers, their work and its contexts; and will further develop their own study, communication and employability skils.

Contemporary British Fiction

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module examines major themes and subgenres in contemporary British fiction (1980s-2000s), and explores how diverse forms of the novel reflect a changing society and culture. The novels studied range from realist to more experimental forms of writing (including graphic novels). The module explores how individual categories of novel address contemporary concerns such as regionalism, multiculturalism and gender / identity.

Year two

Early Modern English Culture 1509-1659: Poetry, Prose, Drama

Year: 2

The module introduces students to the literature of the English Renaissance. Canonical and non-canonical poetry, prose and drama will be studied within a framework of instruction on the sweeping changes brought to England by sectarian tension, increased literacy, changing politics and cultural innovation.

Restoration and Eighteenth Century 1660-1780

Year: 2

This module provides a detailed introduction to literature and society during the long eighteenth century. It introduces significant developments in this period such as the advent of printing and publication on a mass-market scale, the popularity of the novel, and an increased awareness of women?s importance as readers and writers. These developments are discussed in the context of institutions and practices of the modern nation state such as consumer capitalism, credit, and colonial expansion.

The Rise of the Novel

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module is designed to introduce students to the history of the development of early fiction in English, from the early adventure narratives of the Elizabethan era to the emergence of the novel as a leading literary genre in the mid-eighteenth century. It acquaints students with a range of thematic and formal sub-genres of fiction, ranging from tales of adventure to the philosophical romance, from religious allegory to the oriental tale, and from the picaresque to the epistolary.

Romantic Narrative

Year: 2

This module is optional

In literary-critical terms the module analyses the content, meanings, methods and styles of writers of narrative poetry and prose during the English Romantic period. It examines the relationship between tradition and experiment in the genres at a time of revolutionary change. The overriding critical issue in the module will be the creative interaction between literary tradition and the individual, original writer.

Rhymes Of Passion: A Brief History Of Love Poetry

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module offers a broad survey of the sub-genre of love poetry: from its earliest foundations in ancient verse, through classical writing and philosophy, the great flowerings of creativity during Courtly, Renaissance and Romantic periods, to modernist and contemporary practice. Students will become familiar with the conceptual foundations and characteristic features of this sub-genre, as well as gaining an appreciation of its changing nature and literary-historical significance.

Writing and Editing

Year: 2

This module is optional

This practice-based module aims to advance the writing and editing knowledge and skills of students through lectures and workshops focusing on diverse genres of writing. Students are introduced to methods and techniques in the writing and editing processes. Instruction is given in the collaborative teamwork of writers and editors, with students adopting both roles during the course of the module. Formative assessment ensures that all students get a chance to edit and improve their own work before final submission.

Modern Drama and Its Influences

Year: 2

This module is optional

The module is designed to introduce students to the history of the development of modern western drama. After accounting for the ancient tradition of Greek and Renaissance drama there is a focus on the radical aesthetic and thematic developments brought by European giants such as Ibsen and Chekhov. The module then addresses the great period of American tragedy as typified by the work of Williams and Miller before engaging with post-war drama by non-male and non-white writers such as Fornes and Hansberry.

Modern Poetry

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module offers a broad survey of the major authors, trends and issues in post second world war poetry written in English, with an emphasis on authors from Britain and Ireland. It discusses aesthetic innovations and developments, perennial and shifting thematic concerns, and the impact of the changing social, cultural and political environment as reflected within modern and contemporary poetry.

Sex and the City of God: religion and sexuality in American literature

Year: 2

This module is optional

Religion and sexuality are contested and related areas in American culture, not least because of the Puritan origins of the American self. To deepen our understanding of these issues, this module explores the relationship between word and flesh in American writing from the colonial period to the present day. Studying poetry, fiction and non-fiction prose, students will consider the ways in which this Puritan heritage is reproduced, challenged and changed, particularly in writings by women, African-Americans, and Native-Americans.

Gender and Creativity

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module introduces students to theoretical debates about the relationship between gender and creativity, and explores how those debates can be critically applied to contemporary literary texts by male, female, gay and lesbian writers working in diverse genres. By focusing on the question of to what extent writing, and aesthetic production in a broader sense, is in fact gendered, we will consider how developments in feminist theory and masculinity studies, and in the related areas of gender and cultural theory, are applicable to recent film and literature.

Beat Literature and Culture

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module studies Beat Generation writers, including Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, William Burroughs, Gary Snyder and others. It introduces the forerunners of the Beat movement (e.g. Thoreau, Emerson, Arthur Rimbaud), as well as its legacies at the end of the 20th Century (e.g. Burroughs' influence on punk), and after the millennium, for example in Cormac McCarthy's novel The Road (2006). The module uses interdisciplinary elements such as biographical studies, reference to film and music, and indications of the Beats' political and spiritual dimensions.

Angels, Madwomen and Whores

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module enables students to engage with a wide range of writing by women from the 1790s to the end of the nineteenth century. By examining both poetry and prose, this module will uncover self-determined literary representation of female experience throughout the modern period, allowing students to engage with the central issues of gender and identity which affect women?s writing.

Writing the North: Ulster Literature

Year: 2

This module is optional

The module introduces students to representations of, and imaginative responses to the North of Ireland; and to the central debates surrounding these representations and responses.

Modern British Fiction

Year: 2

This module is optional

The module offers an overview of the main modes and genres of fiction writing that arose in the post-war period in Britain (1950s-1970s). It introduces students to the relationship between literature and the historical and social climate in which it was written; and compares then-contemporary trends in British literature with those of other countries, taking into account varying critical and theoretical views on the role and nature of literature.

Year three

Romantics and Victorians

Year: 3

The module is designed to introduce students to the history of English literature of the nineteenth century. It will trace, through the study of a selection of the most representative works of the period's poetry and prose, the rise and development of Romanticism and its continuation - and gradual transformation - in the writings of the Victorian era.

Words In Freedom: The Modernist Revolution in Literature, 1909 - 1930

Year: 3

This module is optional

The module is designed to introduce students to modernist poetry and novels written between 1909 and 1930. It will detail, through the study of a selection of works by celebrated writers of the period, the major thematic preoccupations and formal innovations characteristic of modernism, focusing in particular on developing a conceptual understanding of modernism, and on the philosophical, socio-historical and aesthetic significance of this movement in the context of early-twentieth-century cultural norms.

Special Topic in English

Year: 3

This module is optional

This module enables the student to plan, prepare, write up, and present a dissertation of 6,000-8,000 words on a topic selected by the student and researched under the guidance of a suitably qualified member of staff.

The Victorian Novel

Year: 3

This module is optional

The module is designed to introduce students to the thematic and formal diversity of Victorian fiction, as illustrated through he works of the leading novelists of the period. The sub-genres studied will include, among others, social-problem, historical, sensational, regional, and adventure fiction; in aesthetic terms, the novels on the module will exemplify a range of formats and story-telling conventions, from the picaresque to pastoral romance, from realism to symbolism, and from comedy of manners to naturalism.

Romantic Poetry and Theory

Year: 3

This module is optional

In depth study of work by selected major Romantic poets, including consideration of the variety of principles informing the Romantic movement. The theoretical works of the writers will be studied along with their poetic writing. The poets? writing will be analysed in detail so as to determine the relation between poetic creation and tradition, and the nature of the creative imagination. The module also gives attention to the diversity of critical approaches to the subject of Romanticism, and to the debate about the application of the term itself.

Writing and Publishing

Year: 3

This module is optional

Students on this module learn about the functions, and apply some of the methods, of professionals in the publishing process (by undertaking tasks associated with writers, literary agents, editors, etc.). They workshop their own and each other's writing, and edit texts to publication standard and requirements. A relatively sophisticated degree of self-assessment is required regarding their accumulated insights into writing and publishing. Students are responsible for the quality of group and individual presentations, research and written work.

Nineteenth-Century American Literature

Year: 3

This module is optional

This module examines American literature of the nineteenth century in its social, historical and cultural contexts.

Twentieth-Century American Literature

Year: 3

This module is optional

The module surveys the history of twentieth-century American literature in its social, cultural and political context; it involves close study of texts by major canonical American writers of the period, and discussion of broader issues including the American Dream and the relationship between the American and English literary traditions. The module links with the first semester module in nineteenth-century American literature, with other modules in English and European literature, and with related modules in American History.

Body, Mind and Soul in Novels and Non-Fiction fron Addison to Austen

Year: 3

This module is optional

The module offers a survey of ideas about the human body, mind and soul in texts ranging chronologically from Joseph Addison and Richard Steele?s Spectator (1711) to Jane Austen?s Mansfield Park (1814). It investigates the links between literature and medicine, psychology and philosophy, and will be of interest to students who want to explore how literature engages with issues such as belief, education, pain, pleasure, sexuality and disease.

Adaptation and Historical Fiction

Year: 3

This module is optional

Adaptation and Historical Fiction looks closely at the relationship between literature, history, film and television. The module explores how and why history provides material for fiction and explores the process of adaptation across different media. Texts include popular and experimental adaptations and re-imaginings of writers and historical periods from Shakespeare to Austen and beyond.

The Ulster-Scots Literary Tradition 1750 - 2000

Year: 3

This module is optional

The module is designed to introduce students to the history of Ulster-Scots literature from the middle of the eighteenth to the beginning of the twenty-first century. It will trace the relationship of Ulster writing to Scottish cultural, literary, political, philosophical and linguistic influences in this period. The module will investigate the development, revivals and transformations of Ulster-Scots literature through an examination of its most representative and important authors.

FROM THE VOTE TO THE PILL: C20TH AND C21ST WOMEN?S WRITING

Year: 3

This module is optional

This module will enable students to engage with a variety of writing, in different genres, by women writers of the modern and the postmodern period, and will develop their understanding of the ways in which new political, social, and sexual freedoms have impacted upon women in the twentieth century.

Renaissance Drama, 1485-1625: Sex, Politics And Death

Year: 3

This module is optional

The module immerses students in the aesthetically and thematically plural worlds of Renaissance drama ? taught chronologically from early Henrician times to the early Stuart era. Many playwrights are addressed; issues raised will include canonicity, genre, public and private performance, theatre as propaganda and/or resistance, women?s roles, sexual license, censorship, animals and the environment, authorial celebrity, collaboration, anonymity, textual authority, nuances of dialogue and the historicising of drama.

20th Century Irish Writers

Year: 3

This module is optional

This module celebrates three of the most influential (Irish) writers of the Twentieth Century, W B Yeats, James Joyce and Samuel Beckett. Through an examination of poetry, drama and prose we will consider the development of each writer?s work, explore their relationship to Ireland and Europe and examine some of the most significant and innovative writing of the twentieth century.

Entry conditions

We recognise a range of qualifications for admission to our courses. In addition to the specific entry conditions for this course you must also meet the University’s General Entrance Requirements.

In this section

A level

The A Level requirement for this course is BBC∆ at A2.

∆ = Applicants may satisfy the requirement for the A level C grade by substituting a combination of alternative qualifications to the same standard as defined by the University.

BTEC

BTECNational Extended Diploma

Overall BTEC National Extended Diploma profile requires a minimum of:

DMM award profile to include a minimum of 8 distinctions in level 3 units

BTEC National Diploma

The National Diploma may be accepted in combination with other qualifications. Where an applicant offers a profile of Diploma and an A level then the Diploma should be achieved at the upper end of the standard A level offer profile (i.e. if one A level is offered with a Diploma and our standard A level offer is BBC then we normally ask for a BB equivalent at Diploma and the A level at grade C, see further below).

BB = Distinction, Merit (To include 6 distinctions)

BC = Distinction, Merit (To include 5 distinctions)

BTEC SUBSIDIARY DIPLOMA/NATIONAL EXTENDED CERTIFICATE

The Subsidiary Diploma/National Extended Certificate may be accepted in combination with A levels. Where A levels are offered as part of a profile then they should be achieved at the upper end of the standard A level offer profile (i.e. if two A levels are offered with a Subsidiary Diploma and our standard A level offer is BBC then we normally ask for BB at A level with the Subsidiary Diploma offer at the appropriate differential to satisfy the A level grade profile (grade C) - see further below).

A* grade = Distinction* (To include 5 distinctions in level 3 units)

A grade = Distinction (To include 4 distinctions in level 3 units)

B grade = Distinction (To include 3 distinctions in level 3 units)

C grade = Merit (To include 5 merits in level 3 units)

D grade = Merit (to include 4 merits in level 3 units)

∆ = Diploma and Sub-Dip applicants may satisfy the requirement for an element of the offer grade profiles (equating to the final A-level grade stated in the standard 3A level offer profile - grade C) by substituting a combination of alternative qualifications to the same standard as defined by the University.

Irish Leaving Certificate

The Irish Leaving Certificate requirement for this course is grades

H3,H3,H3,H3,H4 at higher level.

Scottish Highers

The Scottish Highers requirement for this course is grades

BBCCC∆.

∆ = applicants may satisfy the requirement for an element of the offer grade profiles (equating to the final A-level grade stated in the standard 3A level offer profile - grade C) by substituting a combination of alternative qualifications to the same standard as defined by the University.

Scottish Advanced Highers

The Scottish Advanced Highers requirement for this course is grades

CCD∆.

∆ = applicants may satisfy the requirement for an element of the offer grade profiles (equating to the final A-level grade stated in the standard 3A level offer profile - grade C) by substituting a combination of alternative qualifications to the same standard as defined by the University.

International Baccalaureate

Overall International Baccalaureate profile minimum of

25 points to include 12 at higher level.

Access to Higher Education (HE)

For Access qualifications validated by Ulster University or QUB the entry requirement is:

An overall mark of 65%

For GB QAA accredited Higher Education Diploma qualifications the entry requirement is as follows:

Award of the HE Diploma in a related subject area, achieving a minimum of 18 credits at distinction and 24 credits at merit in the 45 level 3 graded credits.

GCSE

Please refer to the University’s general entrance requirements.

English Language Requirements

English language requirements for international applicants
The minimum requirement for this course is Academic IELTS 6.0 with no band score less than 5.5. Trinity ISE: Pass at level III also meets this requirement for Tier 4 visa purposes.

Ulster recognises a number of other English language tests and comparable IELTS equivalent scores.

Additional Entry Requirements

HND

Applicants holding a HND should achieve an overall merit for entry to Year 1. Those applicants holding a subject-related HND with an overall merit may be considered for entry to Year 2

HNC

Applicants holding a HNC should achieve an overall distinction for entry to Year 1 only.

Foundation Degree

Applicants holding a Foundation Degree should achieve an overall mark of 50% in level 5 modules for Year 1 entry. Those applicants holding a subject-related Foundation Degree may be considered for entry to Year 2.

APEL (Accreditation of Prior Experiential Learning)

The University will consider applications on the basis of experiential learning for those who do not hold the normal entry qualifications.

Transfer from degree level study at other institutions

Those applicants seeking entry with advanced standing, (eg. Transfer from another institution or year 2 entry) will be considered on an individual basis.

Teaching and learning assessment

Students attend lectures, seminars and screenings and complete a range of assessments including essays, reports, presentations and blogs.

Careers & opportunities

In this section

Career options

Graduates in Media Studies are well prepared to go into a wide range of careers or further study. These degrees are intended as a broad preparation for working life and Media Studies offers a particularly exciting opportunity to study the role played in our lives by broadcasting, the press and the other powerful media of public communication.

Students completing a course with English as a minor are well equipped for undertaking postgraduate work in relevant areas of study. A degree containing a significant element of English equips you for the wide variety of careers that require advanced communicative skills, both written and oral, including publishing, journalism and the media, public relations, the creative arts, marketing and retail, arts administration, and many sectors of the civil service.

For information on postgraduate research opportunities see: www.arts.ulster.ac.uk/rgs.

Work placement / study abroad

Students will complete a short work placement in their second year.

If students are interested in studying abroad, they will be offered opportunities to attend partner institutions in Europe through the ERASMUS programme and the USA through the ISEP scheme. More information is available at:

http://www.ulster.ac.uk/international/outgoing-students/erasmus

http://www.ulster.ac.uk/international/outgoing-students/isep

Apply

How to apply Request a prospectus

Applications to full-time undergraduate degrees at Ulster are made through UCAS

Start dates

  • September 2018

Fees and funding

In this section

Fees (per year)

Important notice - fees information Please note fees displayed are for 2017/18 Academic Entry. Fees are correct at the time of publishing. Additional mandatory costs are highlighted where they are known in advance. There are other costs associated with university study.
Visit our Fees pages to find out more

Northern Ireland & EU:
£4,030.00
England, Scotland & Wales:
£9,000.00  Discounts available
International:
£13,240.00  Scholarships available

Additional mandatory costs

Tuition fees and costs associated with accommodation, travel (including car parking charges), and normal living are a part of university life.

Where a course has additional mandatory expenses we make every effort to highlight them. These may include residential visits, field trips, materials (e.g. art, design, engineering) inoculations, security checks, computer equipment, uniforms, professional memberships etc.

We aim to provide students with the learning materials needed to support their studies. Our libraries are a valuable resource with an extensive collection of books and journals as well as first-class facilities and IT equipment. Computer suites and free wifi is also available on each of the campuses.

There will be some additional costs to being a student which cannot be itemised and these will be different for each student. You may choose to purchase your own textbooks and course materials or prefer your own computer and software. Printing and binding may also be required. There are additional fees for graduation ceremonies, examination resits and library fines. Additional costs vary from course to course.

Students choosing a period of paid work placement or study abroad as part of their course should be aware that there may be additional travel and living costs as well as tuition fees.

Please contact the course team for more information.

Contact

For further information please contact Sally Quinn:

E: s.quinn@ulster.ac.uk

For admissions queries please email: arts@ulster.ac.uk

Course Director: Tim Hancock

T: +44 (0)28 7012 4551

E: tc.hancock@ulster.ac.uk.

Testimonials

Patrick Auld

Patrick Auld- Recent Graduate Patrick studied Media and Film, graduating in 2009 and currently works as independent filmmaker and videographer. Patrick has worked on productions for BBC, Film Four and Universal and has had his worked screened in the local film festival circuit.

"Although the Student life has it's social side, you have to maintain a good balance through your years of study. For my three years, to keep on top of things I would remember my deadlines, essential assignments and most importantly the big dissertation. Your level of commitment, creativity and focus are what matters and will ultimately determine your degree grade. Lecturers will always be patient and open your mind to other areas of interest you may not have known before."

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Matthew O'Neill

Caroline NorrisMatthew O'Neill received his BA Hons in Media with Film studies from University of Ulster in 2011. Since then he has completed an MA in Film and Visual studies from Queens University of Belfast and attended the Center for Research and Education on Gender and Sexuality at San Francisco State University. He is an active Trans Ally whose research focus is primarily looking at the representation of the trans community within the United Kingdom and Ireland. He has just recently published a chapter on the use of YouTube videos and Trans Youth in an edited collection entitled Queer Youth and Media Cultures. He is currently in the process of applying for a PhD programme.

"A Media Degree from Ulster gave me the space to grow as a person, enabled me to think critically of the world around me and equipped me with a set of skills that can be taken to any workplace. Lecturers are attentive in their support and encouragement towards students, but understand the need to develop independent thought, a requisite for a University education."

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Dr Orla Lafferty

Mark RobinsonOrla Lafferty studied Media in combination with English and graduated in 2007. In 2013 she completed a PhD in Media studies based on an analysis of UTV's reporting of the Troubles. She has presented her findings at international conferences and published in her work in various media and cultural studies journals. She currently works on a diaspora project with Donegal County Council.

"Completing a B.A. Hons in English and Media Studies gave me a stong foundation in many skills including critical analysis, writing and research. My interest in research lead to me completing a PhD project within the film archive at Ulster Television. While conducting research I also learnt about the day-to-day running of a film archive and its value to the organisation, a truly worthwhile experience which has certainly enhanced my career prospects."

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