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Overview

Summary

The majority of the world?s population speaks more than one language and the monolingual situation is now rather uncommon. Multilingualism, however, is often considered an inappropriate developmental choice for children with language disorders (SLI, ASD among others) because, according to a widespread belief, these children?s limited capacity for language would be overtaxed by learning two linguistic systems. However, there is a total lack of research evidence to support this belief, and therefore there is a real need to inform health and education professionals as to current linguistics advances in the study of multilingualism. This module aims to do exactly that: introduce language professionals to current knowledge and thinking around recent advances on multilingualism, present topical current theoretical debates and link that to practice.

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About this course

In this section

About

The majority of the world’s population speaks more than one language making monolingualism now relatively uncommon. Multilingualism, however, is often considered an inappropriate developmental choice for children with specific language impairment (SLI) because, according to a widespread belief, these children’s limited capacity for language would be overtaxed by learning two linguistic systems. Similarly, there is a prevalent belief in clinical settings that children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) who are brought up bilingually may also experience additional delays in language development. Recently these views have been contested Over 50% of speech and language therapist working in a generic child setting work with one or more bilingual children. There are concerns that multilingual children are underrepresented on speech and language therapy caseloads due to difficulties with referral agents identifying speech, language and communication needs in multilingual children. Therefore there is a real need to inform speech and language therapy professionals to be exposed to current linguistics advances in the study of multilingualism especially as bilingual individuals are vulnerable to both under and over-diagnosis of language disorders, exactly because they are bilingual/multiligual. This module aims to do exactly that: introduce language professionals to current knowledge and thinking around recent advances on multilingualism, present topical current theoretical debates and hence facilitate the linking of this knowledge to practice. This module aims to develop students’ ability to examine and reflect on multilingualism from a linguistic perspective. The module will apply students’ knowledge of theoretical models of language structure, acquisition and use to the distinctive properties of the acquisition and use of more than one language. The goal of this module is to develop students’ understanding of specific theoretical approaches to multilingualism, including current debates such as the existence 1 November 2017 and nature of “transfer” (cross-linguistic influence) and to link current theoretical advances to practice

This module is available as a credit bearing module or can be taken as part of a postgraduate Certificate / Diploma.

Linked programmes

PgCert/PgDip/MSc Advancing Practice, PgCert/PgDip/MSc Advancing Practice

Assessment

100% Coursework

Attendance

Module runs over a 12 week period in total. Students are expected to attend all classes and complete all coursework associated with the module.

Exact Teaching dates are TBC

Entry requirements

Applicants must:

(a)(i) Have a second class Honours degree or better in an Allied Health Profession subject from a university of the United Kingdom or the Republic of Ireland, from the Council for National Academic Awards, the National Council for Educational Awards, the Higher Education and Training Awards Council, or from an institution of another country which has been recognised as being of an equivalent standard; or

(ii) Have an equivalent standard in a Postgraduate Certificate, Graduate Diploma, Graduate Certificate or an approved alternative qualification; and

(iii) Where applicable be eligible for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council.

(iv) Where applicable have continued employment in an area relevant to the chosen modules.

(v) Have a minimum of one year's post-qualification experience (excluding course attendance).

(b) Provide evidence of competence in written and spoken English (GCSE grade C or equivalent) and for non-native English speakers, IELTS 7.0 (with no contributing band at less than 6.5) or, as an alternative to (a) (i) or (a) (ii) and/or (b):

(c) In exceptional circumstances, where an individual has substantial and significant experiential learning, a portfolio of written evidence demonstrating the meeting of graduate qualities (including subject-specific outcomes, as determined by the Course Committee) may be considered as an alternative entrance route. Evidence used to demonstrate graduate qualities may not be used for exemption against modules within the programme.

English Language Requirements

English language requirements for international applicants
The minimum requirement for this course is Academic IELTS 7.0 with no band score less than 6.5.

Ulster recognises a number of other English language tests and comparable IELTS equivalent scores.

Start dates

  • 29 January 2018
How to apply

Apply

How to apply

SELF FUNDED PLACES
Interested self-funded candidates should make a direct application using the University's online application system which can be accessed via the University homepage or by using the following link: http://www.ulster.ac.uk/applyonline.

COMMISSIONED PLACES
Anyone who will be receiving a Commissioned place from the Department of Health (DoH) in Northern Ireland via their HSC Trust should contact their Line Manager in their Health and Social Care Trust in order to obtain a Commissioned Application Form. Please DO NOT apply directly via the University online application system.

Commissioned application forms are distributed from Ulster to HSC Trust representatives normally in July/August for Semester 1 modules and November/December for Semester 2 modules.

Start dates

  • 29 January 2018

Fees and funding

In this section

Prices

Northern Ireland & EU:
£882.00
England, Scotland & Wales:
£882.00
International:
£2,206.50

Fees information

Please note fees displayed are for 2017/18 Academic Entry. Fees are correct at the time of publishing.

Information about how to pay for a course including different payment options is available at

http://www.ulster.ac.uk/finance/fees/payment_policy_1718.pdf

Contact

Module Co-ordinator:​

Dr Orla Duffy

T: +44 (0)28 9036 6925

E: od.duffy@ulster.ac.uk

Faculty contact regarding admissions and application process:

Mrs Julie Nesbitt

T: +44 (0)28 9036 6029

E: jh.nesbitt@ulster.ac.uk