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Overview

This course offers students a broad engineering experience designed to suit the current needs for Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Summary

The BEng Hons Electrical and Electronic Engineering degree will prepare you to become a professional electrical engineer, working on electrical products and systems, from research and design to installation. It will be your job to deal with the input of power to electrical systems, as well as with data acquisition and gathering.

You will be qualified to work in many areas, including power generation and control, transportation, IT, manufacturing, construction and telecommunications.

Most electrical engineers work with large-scale electrical systems, such as using electricity to transmit energy, however a wide range of technologies are being developed, from household appliances and installing lighting within buildings, to power stations and satellite communications.

The course has a built-in year of work experience, where students work in industry during their third year, making it a highly practical degree with highly trained graduates.

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About this course

In this section

About

This course aims to prepare graduates to contribute to the electronic and electrical power industry. The course will develop theoretical and practical skills in electronics, power and renewable energy engineering which are widely sought after across the wider engineering sector.

Year 1 provides an understanding of fundamental electrical and electronic engineering principles. It equips students with additional mathematical skills, identifies the potential of computer-based information handling, analysis and graphics, and develops the skills necessary for effective communication. Topics covered include electrical circuits, engineering mathematics, electrical systems, electrical technology, design and CAE and professional studies.

Year 2 builds on those skills developed in year 1. Students’ analytical skills are enhanced through their involvement in a wide range of engineering situations and roles. In the field, engineers will be expected to prepare project specifications, undertake research, create test procedures, write reports and interpret data. Modules offered are: control theory and applications, engineering analysis, electrical services, microprocessor design, power and communications.

Year 3 Industrial placement. The third year is spent on Industrial Placement, an integral and compulsory part of the course. The student works as a trainee engineer in a relevant company and is paid an attractive salary. During placement, students develop key skills including project management, leadership and communication, as well as commercial awareness, which are crucial to being a professional electrical engineer.

Year 4 Students in their final year will study topics which include industrial automation and control, design, industrial applications and undertake a final year project.

Attendance

Attendance is part-time, day-time and typically requires one full day or two half-days per week for 12 teaching weeks each semester. The attendance requirements may vary from semester to semester.

Start dates

  • September 2017
How to apply

Modules

Here is a guide to the subjects studied on this course.

Courses are continually reviewed to take advantage of new teaching approaches and developments in research, industry and the professions. Please be aware that modules may change for your year of entry. The exact modules available and their order may vary depending on course updates, staff availability, timetabling and student demand. Please contact the course team for the most up to date module list.

In this section

Year one

Mathematics for Engineering I

Year: 1

This module provides students with a solid foundation in the fundamental topics in engineering mathematics. The material develops the student?s competencies in the essential mathematics that forms an integral part of an undergraduate honours degree in engineering related disciplines.

Field and Devices

Year: 1

This module will introduce the fundamental concepts of electrostatic and electromagnetic, related rules, electric and magnetic materials and their characteristics, and their applications in physical systems.

Programming for Engineering

Year: 1

This module provides students with a solid foundation in developing software programs using a procedural programming language. It utilises a middle level language to enable the engineering student understand the relationship between software programs and the underlying hardware on which the program operates, whilst learning the key concepts and skills relevant to many modern high level languages.

Design and CAD I

Year: 1

This module includes freehand sketching, systems of projection, drawing conventions,
dimensioning and tolerancing, 3-D digital modelling of parts and assemblies, design
documentation, an introduction to the total design activity, formulation of a product design
specification (PDS), material selection and manufacturing considerations in design

Year two

Digital Electronics I

Year: 2

This module introduces the fundamentals of digital electronic devices and simple logic circuits as well as basic logic design techniques. This module introduces the student to basic digital electronics principles presented using a combination of lectures, tutorials and practical laboratories and are assessed using continuous assessment in the form of class tests and lab practical assessments.

Circuit Analysis I

Year: 2

This module provides an introduction to the key electronic components, the basic concepts of electronic circuit design and the basic principles of electronic circuit test and measurement. This module introduces the student to analogue electronics principles presented using a combination of lectures, tutorials and practical laboratories and are assessed using continuous assessment in the form of class tests and lab practical assessments.

Year three

Mathematics for Engineering II

Year: 3

This module introduces students to the essential mathematics required for embarking on further study in engineering, computing or a related discipline. It develops the students mathematical skills required to solve problems that arise in the context of their undergraduate study. The module content is introduced in a pragmatic way and then related to real world problems, which enhances understanding and makes the concepts more meaningful and relevant for the student. The module also aims to generate in the student a spirit of mathematical investigation and discovery leading to the development of mathematical confidence.

Digital Electronics II

Year: 3

This module introduces digital building blocks and the principles of modern digital systems design. The module also discusses performance issues related to the realisation of digital systems. Both elements of the module are presented through lectures, tutorials and practical sessions and are assessed using both continuous assessment and formal written examination methods.

Power System Analysis and Protection

Year: 3

This module covers the principle concepts of analysis and protection of modern power systems. It builds upon the operation of power systems under normal operations, fault analysis and principle of power system protection.

Electrical and Energy Engineering

Year: 3

Building on the fundamentals covered in ENE123 (EEE186 Magee), the aim is to develop design skills in the technologies and energy engineering involved with electricity generation, its supply, distribution and end use of electricity, both in a domestic and industrial context.

Year four

Professional Issues

Year: 4

The module prepares students for professional work including the responsibilities and obligations of employees, employers and clients as determined in codes of professional conducts. Students will have the opportunity to practise the presentation of themselves in, for example, application forms, curriculum vitae, interview and aptitude tests. In addition the module addresses issues such as intellectual property rights and defamation, data protection, computer misuse and other ethical issues related to working as a professional in the software sector.

Embedded Programming

Year: 4

This module introduces embedded C programming. focus is on embedded programming concepts targeting the design of embedded programs for dedicated micro-processor/controllers hardware used in a wide array of modern applications including automobiles, domestic appliances and mobile technology including IoT systems.

Electronics Systems Design

Year: 4

This module introduces the principles of design of analogue and digital building blocks which can be integrated to form electronic systems of moderate complexity. The module also discusses issues related to the interfacing of analogue and digital signals. Both elements of the module are presented through lectures, tutorials and practicals and are assessed using both continuous assessment and formal written examination methods.

Year five

Programmable logic systems

Year: 5

This module is designed to reinforce and further develop a student's digital design and implementation skills. It is presented via lectures, tutorials, seminars and practicals and is assessed using both continuous assessment and formal written examination methods.

Mixed Signal Design

Year: 5

This module provides students with a good understanding of semiconductor materials and devices. Additionally students will be exposed to several microelectronic circuit analysis techniques using bipolar and MOS circuits. Also the temperature stability of these circuits will be discussed with reference to selected circuits. Finally models of delay lines will be introduced using worked examples and also noise analysis will be discussed. All teaching material will be supported with lab simulations.

Electrical & Electronic Machines

Year: 5

The module covers the theoretical and practical aspects of Power Electronics and Electrical Machines combined with the required new power semiconductors.

Electrical Energy & Smart Grids

Year: 5

The module covers theoretical and practical aspects of power systems with a large proportion of decentralised energy production.

Year six

Research Studies and Project Management

Year: 6

This module is designed to equip students with the appropriate research and project management skills needed to complete a project within the Computing domain. Firstly, the module provides an underpinning foundation of research concepts, methods and techniques necessary for project development and delivery. Secondly, the different stages of the research process are demonstrated. Thirdly, the students employ skills developed during the module to create a set of project deliverables such as project plan and proposal, critically reviewed literature papers, literature review and project presentation. Embedded in all these activities is the reinforcement of the need for adhering to recognised ethical standards and taking a professional approach to carrying out research.

Final Year Project

Year: 6

Students are required to undertake an individual project during the final year of the course. Its purpose is to provide an experience of developing a software/hardware/engineering solution to a realistic problem. This work combines skills and knowledge acquired previously on the course with those acquired during the project. In particular, students will have an opportunity to (i) strengthen their competence in project management, in taking an initial concept through to a successful implementation; and (ii) enhance their communication skills, in producing a dissertation and defending the work.

Entry conditions

We recognise a range of qualifications for admission to our courses. In addition to the specific entry conditions for this course you must also meet the University’s General Entrance Requirements.

In this section

A level

You will normally be in full-time employment in an engineering capacity regarded as satisfying the industrial training requirements of the equivalent full-time courses. You should have attained a high level of performance in a Higher National Diploma/Higher National Certificate in an appropriate engineering subject, or a Bachelor of Technology degree, or hold an equivalent qualification e.g. Foundation Degree.

You will be required to satisfy the Course Committee that you have the support of your employer for release to attend the courses.

Please check the GCSE requirements below for entry to this course.

GCSE

GCSE (or equivalent) profile to include minimum of Grade C or above in Mathematics and English Language.

The Faculty of Computing and Engineering does not accept students with Essential Skills in Application of Number as the only mathematics qualification. Please contact the Faculty Office directly on Tel: +44 (0)28 9036 6305 if you have a query concerning this matter.

English Language Requirements

English language requirements for international applicants
The minimum requirement for this course is Academic IELTS 6.0 with no band score less than 5.5. Trinity ISE: Pass at level III also meets this requirement for Tier 4 visa purposes.

Ulster recognises a number of other English language tests and comparable IELTS equivalent scores.

Teaching and learning assessment

Formal lectures are supplemented by tutorials and laboratory investigations, as appropriate. Practical hands-on laboratory sessions are an integral part of many modules throughout all years of the course. Case studies, groupwork and mini-projects are also extensively used. In the final year there is a major individual project.

Generally, a combination of continuous assessment and examination is employed in each module. Continuous assessment includes class tests, library and laboratory based assignments, and individual and group project work. Some modules across all years of the course are continuously assessed.

Exemptions and transferability

Transfer between this course and other similar courses within the Faculty of Computing and Engineering may be possible on the basis of academic performance.

Exemption from parts of the course may be considered based on appropriate performance in a related, designated course or other approved experiential learning (APEL).

The course has been designed to enable students who graduate with a good honours degree to apply for postgraduate study towards a PhD, MSc, MRes or other higher qualification.

Careers & opportunities

In this section

Career options

Job prospects in a wide range of engineering industries are excellent with the majority of graduates finding employment within six months of graduation. Graduates with BEng Hons, first class or upper second class award all satisfy the requirements for a wide range of postgraduate research posts and scholarships.

Apply

Applications to our part-time undergraduate courses are made through the University’s online application system.

How to apply

Start dates

  • September 2017

Fees and funding

In this section

Fees (total cost)

Important notice - fees information Please note fees displayed are for 2017/18 Academic Entry. Fees are correct at the time of publishing. Additional mandatory costs are highlighted where they are known in advance. There are other costs associated with university study.
View Ulster University’s 2017 fees policy

Northern Ireland & EU:
£5,292.00

Scholarships, awards and prizes

This course is suitable for a number of student support awards. Please contact the course director for further information.

Additional mandatory costs

Tuition fees and costs associated with accommodation, travel (including car parking charges), and normal living are a part of university life.

Where a course has additional mandatory expenses we make every effort to highlight them. These may include residential visits, field trips, materials (e.g. art, design, engineering) inoculations, security checks, computer equipment, uniforms, professional memberships etc.

We aim to provide students with the learning materials needed to support their studies. Our libraries are a valuable resource with an extensive collection of books and journals as well as first-class facilities and IT equipment. Computer suites and free wifi is also available on each of the campuses.

There will be some additional costs to being a student which cannot be itemised and these will be different for each student. You may choose to purchase your own textbooks and course materials or prefer your own computer and software. Printing and binding may also be required. There are additional fees for graduation ceremonies, examination resits and library fines. Additional costs vary from course to course.

Students choosing a period of paid work placement or study abroad as part of their course should be aware that there may be additional travel and living costs as well as tuition fees.

Please contact the course team for more information.

Contact

Faculty Office

T: +44 (0)28 9036 6305

E: compeng@ulster.ac.uk

Course Director: Dr JP Quinn

T: +44 (0)28 7167 5461

E: jp.quinn@ulster.ac.uk