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Overview

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Learn from expert researchers how our uniquely broad choice of Histories and skills translate into the work place.

Summary

Study History with Education at Ulster University in the United Kingdom.

This programme addresses early modern, modern and contemporary history, exploring and analyzing many of the major developments that have shaped our current world. You will study the history of Europe, British and Irish history, and also the history of the United States and parts of the Middle East. The programme is particularly strong in international, social and comparative history and is taught by scholars with an excellent research record in these fields. Students can develop specialism’s in areas like gender history, media history, public history and international diplomacy. It is designed to foster your enthusiasm for history and to provide a sound academic and practical basis for a variety of careers.

Studying Education as a minor in combination with another subject offered at Ulster is an excellent introduction to a future career path in the education sector. It will provide you with an introduction to the main concepts and concerns of contemporary educational theory and practice in both Northern Ireland, the UK and internationally.

We find that students who are interested in teaching as a career may decide to add Education to their degree ‘mix’ at undergraduate level before applying for a Postgraduate Certificate in Education after they have completed their degree. Each Education module usually involves a two hour lecture plus a one hour seminar each week. In addition, students are required to undertake substantial directed independent learning.

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About this course

In this section

About

You take up to four modules of History in your first year and two from Education. The first year history modules normally include introductions to topics such as Twentieth Century Irish History, War and History and the Birth of the Modern Age.

In your second year you take two compulsory modules with a particular relation to career choice, Digital History and Employability You will also take Sources and Methods, a module that includes preparations for the final year dissertation. Then you have a choice of four other modules of History from a wide range of options. These include Modern Irish, British and European History;Twentieth Century United States History, The West, the Great Powers and the Middle East, European Witchcraft and Family, Sexuality and the State.

Optional third year of study abroad.

In your final year you must undertake a dissertation on a subject of your own choice (with help from a supervisor) and four other modules from a wide choice which will include the Cold War, the end of the European Empires, a number of Irish history module choices, and Nazism.

You will undertake two Education modules of study in each year of the programme

Attendance

Three years normally or four years if a student takes the option of a year abroad. four to six years part-time.


Each full-time student takes six 20 credit modules per year, each of which equates to 200 hours of work including assessment. The teaching component of each module is usually two lectures and one small group seminar per week. The remainder is independent study including assessment. Part-time students may study up to 80 credits per year.

Start dates

  • September 2016
How to apply

Entry conditions

We recognise a range of qualifications for admission to our courses. In addition to the specific entry conditions for this course you must also meet the University’s General Entrance Requirements.

In this section

A level

The A Level requirement for this course is 280 UCAS tariff points to include a minimum of BBC∆ at A2. Preference may be given to candidates with an A-level grade B in History.

∆ = Applicants may satisfy the requirement for the final A level grade in the above grade profile (C grade) by substituting a combination of alternative qualifications to the same standard as defined by UCAS.

BTEC

Overall BTEC Extended Diploma profile requires a minimum of 280 UCAS tariff points with DMM award profile to include a minimum of 8 distinctions in level 3 units.

BTEC Diploma

The Diploma may be accepted in isolation or in combination with A levels. Where A levels are offered as part of a profile then they should be achieved at the upper end of the standard A level offer profile (i.e. if one A level is offered with a Diploma and our standard A level offer is BBC then we normally ask for a B at A level with the Diploma offer at the appropriate differential to satisfy the total tariff points - see further below).

280 = Distinction*, Distinction* (To include 10 distinctions)

260 = Distinction, Distinction* (To include 9 distinctions)

240 = Distinction, Distinction (To include 8 distinctions)

200 = Distinction, Merit (To include 7 distinctions)

180 = Distinction, Merit (To include 6 distinctions)

160 = Merit, Merit (To include 10 merits)

Preference may be given to candidates with an A-level grade B in History.

BTEC SUBSIDIARY DIPLOMA

The Subsidiary Diploma may be accepted in combination with A levels. Where A levels are offered as part of a profile then they should be achieved at the upper end of the standard A level offer profile (i.e. if two A levels are offered with a Subsidiary Diploma and our standard A level offer is BBC then we normally ask for BB at A level with the Subsidiary Diploma offer at the appropriate differential to satisfy the total tariff points - see further below).

140 = Distinction* (To include 5 distinctions)

120 = Distinction (To include 4 distinctions)

100 = Distinction (To include 3 distinctions)

80 = Merit (To include 5 merits)

Preference may be given to candidates with an A-level grade B in History.

Irish Leaving Certificate

The Irish Leaving Certificate requirement for this course is 280 UCAS tariff points based on an overall Irish Leaving Certificate minimum profile BBBCC at higher level. Preference may be given to candidates with a grade B in History.

Scottish Highers

The Scottish Highers requirement for this course is 280 UCAS tariff points to include a minimum of AAAA∆. Preference may be given to candidates with a grade A in History.

∆ = Applicants may satisfy the requirement for the final grade in the above grade profile (A grade) by substituting a combination of alternative qualifications to the same standard as defined by UCAS.

Scottish Advanced Highers

The Scottish Advanced Highers requirement for this course is 280 UCAS tariff points to include a minimum BBC∆. Preference may be given to candidates with a grade B in History.

∆ = Applicants may satisfy the requirement for the final grade in the above grade profile (C grade) by substituting a combination of alternative qualifications to the same standard as defined by UCAS.

International Baccalaureate

Overall International Baccalaureate profile minimum of 25 points to include 12 at higher level - 280 UCAS tariff points. Preference may be given to those holding History at higher level 5.

Access to Higher Education (HE)

For Access qualifications validated by Ulster University or QUB the entry requirement is as follows:

Overall average of 65%-69% - 280 UCAS tariff points.

For GB QAA accredited Higher Education Diploma qualifications the entry requirement is as follows:

Overall pass in a related subject area, achieving merit or distinction in all of the 45 level 3 graded credits (plus English level 2 equivalences where required).

English Language Requirements

English language requirements for international applicants
The minimum requirement for this course is Academic IELTS 6.0 with no band score less than 5.5. Trinity ISE: Pass at level III also meets this requirement for Tier 4 visa purposes.

Ulster recognises a number of other English language tests and comparable IELTS equivalent scores.

Additional Entry Requirements

Applicants holding a HND should achieve 120 credits at level 5 including a minimum of:

2 distinctions, 2 merits and 4 passes (for entry to Year 1).

Applicants holding a HNC will be considered on an individual basis for year 1 entry.

Applicants holding a Foundation Degree should achieve an overall average of 50% in second year modules for Year 1 entry.

The University will consider applications on the basis of experiential learning for those who do not hold the normal entry qualifications. Those applicants seeking entry with advanced standing, (eg. Transfer from another institution) will be considered on an individual basis but should note that this process can be more difficult in subject combination programmes as both subjects must be satisfied.

Teaching and learning assessment

Teaching and Learning are delivered through a combination of lectures (dealing with both broad and specific areas of history); seminars, tutorials (individual supervision) and workshops; individual study (with varying levels of direction and supervision), involving reading and analysis of primary and secondary sources, preparation for assignments and revision for examinations. Assessment involves evaluation of coursework essays, end-of-semester class tests, written examinations,oral presentations, projects and dissertations.

Exemptions and transferability

Those applicants seeking entry with advanced standing, (eg. Transfer from another institution) will be considered on an individual basis but should note that this process can be more difficult in subject combination programmes as both subjects must be satisfied.

Careers & opportunities

In this section

Career options

History degrees provide opportunities for employment in a variety of jobs. History, as opposed to some of the more vocational degrees, broadens career opportunities and does not narrow a student down to one career path. At a purely practical level, a degree in history is important because it provides the basic skills needed for students to go further in sociology, politics, international relations and economics. As well as obvious career paths such as teaching, History is also an ideal discipline for almost all careers in the law, the civil service and the private sector. This is because the history curriculum teaches students to research and assess material, to gather information and develop arguments, and to reach logical conclusions. The composition of the history essay trains young people to write reports and prepare presentations; skills that employers say graduates lack. It might be noted that history graduates punch above their weight in many disciplines including, finance, public service and the media. Our graduates work in a wide variety of careers including teaching, central and local government, museums and libraries, and as managers in industry and retailing. There is also a broad range of postgraduate opportunities open to you including teaching.

For information on postgraduate research opportunities see: www.arts.ulster.ac.uk/rgs

The study of education in combination with other degree subjects at Ulster will provide you with a first insight into a future career in the education sector.

Work placement / study abroad

The University-approved work placement module in second year is arranged with individual employers and institutions and offers a variety of locations where it can be undertaken. It also possible for students to suggest suitable locations on their own initiative.

If students are interested in studying abroad, they will be offered opportunities to attend partner institutions in Europe through the ERASMUS programme and the USA through the ISEP scheme. More information is available at:

http://www.ulster.ac.uk/international/outgoing-students/erasmus

http://www.ulster.ac.uk/international/outgoing-students/isep

Academic profile

All current staff have researched and published in the areas in which they teach. These areas include Early Moderrn Irish, British and European History, 19th and 20th centuryModern irish, British, European and International History. Students, accordingly, will be have the benefit of being taught by specialists who contribute significantly to the development of their module subjects.

Apply

Applying online at www.ucas.com 

For all full-time higher education courses at universities and colleges in the UK, students must apply online at www.ucas.com . There are three types of applicant.

Students at a school or college registered with UCAS

All UK schools and colleges (and a small number of establishments overseas) are registered with UCAS to manage their students' applications.

Advice is available from your teacher or a careers adviser at your school or college. You fill in an online application and submit it to a member of staff. After checking your details, and having added the academic reference, your school or college submits the completed application online to UCAS. You pay online using a credit card or debit card. You may also be able to pay through your school or college.

Independent applicants in the UK

Other UK applicants, who are not at school or college, apply online independently.

It is likely that you are a mature applicant, who, unlike school and college students, cannot readily seek advice from your teacher, but can instead consult with various careers organisations (such as Connexions). You are responsible for paying the correct application fee, for obtaining and attaching the academic reference and for submitting the completed application online to UCAS.

International applicants outside the UK (EU and worldwide)

Except for those whose school or college is registered with UCAS, individuals from the EU (excluding the UK), and worldwide, apply online independently.

Advice is available from British Council offices and other centres overseas, such as your school or college. You are responsible for paying the correct application fee, for obtaining and attaching the academic reference and for submitting the completed application online to UCAS.

For all applicants, there are full instructions at www.ucas.com  to make it as easy as possible for you to fill in your online application, plus help text where appropriate. UCAS also has a comprehensive guide called Applying Online, which can be downloaded from www.ucas.com 

How to apply

Start dates

  • September 2016

Fees and funding

In this section

Fees (per year)

Northern Ireland & EU:
£3,925.00
England, Scotland & Wales:
£6,000.00
International:
£12,890.00

Scholarships, awards and prizes

A number of prizes and awards are offered covering all three years of academic study. Two are offered for overall achievement in year one(J.L. McCracken Prize in History; George Mitchell Memorial Prize); one for best performance in individual modules in that year(Anthony Alcock Memorial Prize); a prize for best dissertation performance in a degree combining History and English (Jackie McKinny Memorial Prize); others for best overall mark in final year in a degree with 50% content in either English or History (Robinson Woodburn Awards); and another for best final year performance in History modules in any deree with a significant number (The Honourable Irish Society's History Prize). Finally, three awards are given for, respectively, best overall performance in year two; best overall performance in final examinations (for candidates under 23 years of age at the commencement of their studies); best overall performace in final examinations(for candidates at least 23 years of age at the commencement of their studies) The prizes (Thompson Memorial History Awards) are open to students taking any degree which (1); includes four History modules in second year (2); includes a significant number of History modules taken by candidates under 23 ( 3); includes a significant number of History modules taken by students at, or over, 23.

Additional mandatory costs

Education as a minor is a ‘regulated and/or care position’ within the meaning of the Protection of Children and Vulnerable Adults (NI) Order 2003 (POCVA) and the Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups (NI) Order 2007. Depending on the modules you select you may have access to children and/or vulnerable adults and therefore you will be subject to a criminal history check costing approximately £33,.

Tuition fees and costs associated with accommodation, travel and normal living are a part of university life. 

Where a course has additional mandatory expenses we make every effort to highlight them in the online prospectus. These may include residential visits, field trips, materials (e.g. art, design, engineering) inoculations, security checks, computer equipment, uniforms, professional memberships etc.

We aim to provide students with the learning materials needed to support their studies. Our libraries are a valuable resource with an extensive collection of books and journals as well as first-class facilities and IT equipment. Computer suites and free wifi is also available on each of the campuses.

There will be some additional costs to being a student which cannot be itemised and these will be different for each student. You may choose to purchase your own textbooks and course materials or prefer your own computer and software. Printing and binding may also be required. There are additional fees for graduation ceremonies, examination resits and library fines. Additional costs vary from course to course. 

Students choosing a period of paid work placement or study abroad as part of their course should be aware that there may be additional travel and living costs as well as tuition fees. 

Please contact the course team for more information.

Contact

Miss Joanne Taggart, Secretary, School of English and History

Tel: + 44 (0) 28 7012 4474
zj.taggart@ulster.ac.uk

For application queries email arts@ulster.ac.uk

Course Director
Dr James Loughlin

Tel: +44 (0)28 7012 4557
jp.loughlin@ulster.ac.uk

Testimonials

Zoe Brock-Edwards

One thing you'll find out quickly about Coleraine and the local area is how great a student life there is, and not just at night (all the local bars and clubs have great student nights). In your first year, you'll probably live in University halls on campus. There's such good craic to be had here! You'll meet your best mates in halls, go on adventures (the local coastline is great for surfing), and meet local and international students alike. Halls are a great way to get to know people from all over.

I’m sure the Course Director will tell you about the course and the low cost housing in halls so I’ll leave that to him. As for the History department itself, it's very friendly. We had Christmas socials and formals, mixers and acted more like a little family really. There's a great range of modules for all interests, and you can even pick to study modules from other subjects. The staff are easy to get hold of and some of the teaching is in small groups so you don’t feel weird talking in front of others. The best thing about the department is the opportunity to study abroad. You can get to study at a European or American university on either a full year or semester trip. I went to Kent State University in Ohio, one of our 'partner' universities in the USA. It was such great fun and an incredible learning experience - I met friends for life over there. Everyone in History has the chance to go to America and I'd really recommend that you go too!

So don't let the distance, or lack of knowledge about the area put you off studying at the Ulster University. It really is a great place, and the people are so friendly. There are great opportunities to be had by all.