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Graduates from this course have gained employment with a wide range of organisations

  • Citi
  • Deloitte
  • Northern Ireland Civil Service
  • Oxford Economics
  • Ulster University Economic Policy Centre
  • PWC

Graduates from this course are employed in many different roles

  • Accountants
  • Assistant Economist
  • Economist
  • Stockbroker
  • Research Analyst
  • Data Analyst
  • Compliance Officer

Overview

Important notice – campus change This course will move to the Belfast campus in September 2019.  Students will change campus part way through this course. Find out more

In this section

This programme emphasises those aspects of economics that relate to the practical application of economics to policy making, management and business.

Summary

Study Economics at Ulster University in the United Kingdom.

This programme emphasises those aspects of economics which relate to the practical application of cconomics today in policy making, management and firm behaviour and consumer decisions.

This programme aims to provide students with the ability to apply economic principles and models to a wide range of issues as well as understanding the larger driving forces which shape economic and public policy.

Upon successful completion of this programme you will have developed better problem solving skills and have become more adept in numeracy, IT and the use of statistical methods.

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About this course

In this section

About

This course offers you the opportunity to study the many different ways in which society distributes scarce resources such as land, labour, raw materials and machinery to produce goods and services.

There are two subdivisions within economics - microeconomics involves the study of the supply and demand decisions of individuals and firms, such as how profits can be maximised and how much of a good or service consumers will demand at a certain price whilst macroeconomics deals with the study of outcomes in the whole economy concerned with issues such as unemployment, inflation, economic growth, productivity and investment.

Economics relies upon analytical and quantitative techniques to verify or reject theories about such behaviour with one of the most frequently used techniques being econometrics, where statistical techniques are used to formulate models, estimate economic relationships and to develop forecasts.

As well as the core aspects, economics can also be applied to a variety of areas and these are reflected in the topics that you will have the opportunity to study during the programme.

Associate awards

Diploma in Professional Practice DPP

Diploma in International Academic Studies DIAS

Find out more about placement awards

Attendance

Class are timetabled per semester for full-time students.

Three years full-time – BSc Hons.

Four years full-time – BSc Hons with DPP / DIAS.

Start dates

  • September 2016
How to apply

Modules

Here is a guide to the subjects studied on this course.

Courses are continually reviewed to take advantage of new teaching approaches and developments in research, industry and the professions. Please be aware that modules may change for your year of entry. The exact modules available and their order may vary depending on course updates, staff availability, timetabling and student demand.

In this section

Year one

Introduction to Accounting for Business

Year: 1

Introduction to Business Accounting provides an introduction to financial and management accounting. The background to the requirement to produce, and the purpose of preparing accounting statements is examined. The module introduces the student to the study of accounting as it impacts on business and economic activity. In particular it considers the preparation of basic financial statements for sole-traders and introduces the student to terminology used in cost determination and pricing.

Financial Institutions and Markets

Year: 1

To provide students with an overview of the financial system. It seeks to develop students? understanding of financial markets, institutions and the environment within which they operate.

Microeconomic Principles

Year: 1

This module introduces students to key concepts and models used by economists to analyse the microeconomic problems and issues characteristic of contemporary market economies. Emphasis is given to market activity and the consequences this has for different groups within society. The module will allow students to understand the need for government intervention and regulation of market forces within a market economy.

Macroeconomic Principles

Year: 1

This module aims to develop students' knowledge and understanding of the macroeconomic environment exploring the origin of macroeconomics critically evaluating competing theories of macroeconomic behaviour. It introduces students to the issues that Macroeconomics deals with such as the role of government in managing the economy.

Mathematics and Statistics for Economics and Business 1

Year: 1

This module introduces students to some basic mathematical and statistical techniques which can be applied to economic and business problems. ?

Skills for Economists

Year: 1

The successful study of Economics requires the use of a skill-set to communicate ideas and concepts to others ? this module seeks to introduce students to this skill-set.

Year two

Regional Economics: Understanding the Northern Ireland Economy

Year: 2

This module is designed to address a common complaint of employers that contemporary knowledge of the Northern Ireland (NI) economy is limited amongst students. The module will enhance students understanding about the behaviour and operation of the NI economy and how it impacts upon businesses and society in general. The module offers more applied learning in a workplace style mode around contemporary issues with a focus on developing both professional (report writing, analysis and opinion forming) and transferable (IT, team working, communications and business knowledge) skills.
It will also introduce students to the structures and process in economic policy making and allow students to tailor their placement application to the type of instruction in which their skills will be best suited. It will utilise guest lectures to familiarise students with what potential employer?s value and it will hone presentation and interview skills. It will advance data skills to a commercial standard.

Mathematics and Statistics for Economics and Business 2

Year: 2

This module further develops the mathematical and statistical techniques which can be applied to economic and business problems.

Microeconomics 2

Year: 2

In an increasingly competitive world in which economic decisions have to be "optimal", it is essential that students of economics should gain an understanding of the basic principles and applications of microeconomics. The implicit theme of this module is the concept of decision making by market participants and the role of markets in coordinating these decisions resulting in efficient economic outcomes.

Macroeconomics 2

Year: 2

This module provides an account of the structure of macroeconomic theory and of how its parts interact. It also reviews some of the thoeretical questions and controversies surrounding this structure. Finally it uses macroeconomic theory to shed light on some real world issues and problems.

International Economics

Year: 2

This module is optional

In the increasingly integrated world economy of the modern times, it is essential that students of business economics should gain an understanding of the basic principles and issues of international economics. This module will seek to provide such an understanding and an appreciation of the major trade-related issues facing both the developed and the developing world. It will also seek to enable students to acquire the skills necessary to analyse real world problems with the help of appropriate analytical tools and a sound theoretical framework. The module will be delivered in both large group and small group sessions and the assessment will be based partly on course work and partly on sessional examination.

Public Sector Economics

Year: 2

This module is optional

The public sector constitutes a significant part of contemporary developed economies. This raises a number of important economic issues: the efficiency of resource allocation, which requires the appreciation of Pareto optimality; the nature and supply of public goods; the consequences of the imposition of taxes on economic behaviour; the institutional structure to ascertain social preferences.

Industrial Economics - Understanding and Regulating Markets

Year: 2

This module is optional

Industrial Economics explores the workings of markets and industries using the techniques of economic analysis, examining some of the aspects that relate to if the state should and how the state may intervene in the operation of those markets.

Year three

Professional Practice

Year: 3

This module is optional

This module enables students who have secured a placement job to complete a period of appropriate work experience in a supportive environment. Students will have opportunities to gain employability skills, reflect upon the applicability of their subject specific skills, and gain insight into the graduate job market. Students who successfully complete the module are eligible for the award of Diploma in Professional Practice (DPP) or Diploma in Professional Practice International (DPPI).

International Academic Studies

Year: 3

This module is optional

This module provides an opportunity to undertake an extended period of study outside the UK and Republic of Ireland. Students will develop an enhanced understanding of the academic discipline whilst generating educational and cultural networks.

Year four

Economics and Business Forecasting

Year: 4

For a business to be forward looking requires anticipation of the environment in which it operates. This module exploits a software package, Microsoft Excel, that is widely available so that the techniques covered can be employed in most business settings.

Dissertation: A Sustained Investigation in Economics

Year: 4

This module provides students with the opportunity to undertake a substantive individual piece of research in an area of economics.

Issues in Microeconomics

Year: 4

This module aims to develop students' knowledge and understanding of applying microeconomics to the analysis of economic issues at an advanced level.

Issues in Macroeconomics

Year: 4

The inability of conventional macroeconomic models to explain the events has prompted the revival of the Keynesian view of the world. This module critically evaluates a range of traditional models of macroeconomic behaviour based upon perfectly competitive behaviour in factor and output markets and sets out a range of models based upon imperfectly competitive behaviour that offer a more satisfactory explanation for a set of stylised facts of modern economic outcomes.

Regional Economics: UK Regions and Cities, Theory Policy and Forecasting

Year: 4

This module is optional

The Regional Economics module gives students a different spatial perspective on the economic development process. It examines a variety of approaches to modelling regional economics and to measuring the impact of regional policies. It also offers students an opportunity to undertake some empirical work that enhances their understanding of regional diversity.

Economics of Globalisation

Year: 4

This module is optional

Globalisation is an inescapable part of the economic life of every nation in the modern world. An understanding of the economic principles and the empirical reality of globalization is essential for both being able to make sense of what is happening in the world and for formulating appropriate policy responses to global economic changes. This module focuses on both theory and practice of globalization, and, critically discusses relevant economic principles and policies.

Economics of Governance

Year: 4

This module is optional

More often than not individuals have to make decisions and act without full knowledge of the environment where they operate. How this imperfect information affects the motives of sellers and buyers and economic relations more generally, is the subject of the present module. After analyzing basic concepts like property rights, contracts and transaction costs, it examines the sources of asymmetric information and its consequences on behaviour. This is followed by a presentation of the principal ? agent relationship and the firm as a hierarchy and an examination of the institutions, incentive contracts and governance structures designed to resolve conflicting interests of the participating economic actors.

Economic Policy

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module is designed to develop skills that are in frequent use in the current workplace for professional economists in either government work or in the consultancy market. It builds upon work in earlier courses developing practical analytical tools in addition to honing presentation and writing skills. A major focus is instilling disciplines of accuracy and checking into data and written work by emphasising the implications of mistakes and false interpretation. ?

History of Economic Thought

Year: 4

This module is optional

Many issues in economics can best be placed and understood in the context of the development of economic thought. The module therefore seeks to provide students with a grounding in the works of the key thinkers in economic thought since 1700 including Smith, Ricardo, Marx, Marshall, Keynes and Friedman.

Entry conditions

We recognise a range of qualifications for admission to our courses. In addition to the specific entry conditions for this course you must also meet the University’s General Entrance Requirements.

In this section

A level

The A Level requirement for this course is BBB or BBC to include A Level Mathematics.

BTEC

Overall BTEC award profile DDM to include Unit profile of 9 distinctions.

Irish Leaving Certificate

Overall Irish Leaving Certificate profile BBBBB or BBBCC to include Maths at Higher level.

Scottish Highers

The Scottish Highers requirement for this course is AABCC.

Scottish Advanced Highers

The Scottish Advanced Highers requirement for this course is BBB.

International Baccalaureate

Overall International Baccalaureate profile minimum 25 points (12 at higher level).

Access to Higher Education (HE)

Overall Access profile 70%.

GCSE

GCSE Profile to include Maths with a minimum Grade B.

GCSE Profile to include English Language with a minimum Grade C.

English Language Requirements

English language requirements for international applicants
The minimum requirement for this course is Academic IELTS 6.0 with no band score less than 5.5. Trinity ISE: Pass at level III also meets this requirement for Tier 4 visa purposes.

Ulster recognises a number of other English language tests and comparable IELTS equivalent scores.

Teaching and learning assessment

The teaching and learning methods used on the Economics programme include lectures (including guest speakers), seminars, PC lab classes, independent and self-directed reading and IT based resources.

Different modules on the Economics programme adopt different assessment strategies and may include computer based exercises, class tests, presentations (individual and group), group projects, case studies, essays, reports and examinations.

Exemptions and transferability

Most students enter Year 1 of the programme. Applicants who can provide evidence of previous relevant study, awarded in accordance with the Credit Accumulation Transfer Scheme (CATS), may be considered for entry to Year 2. In appropriate cases opportunities exist at the end of Year 1 for reciprocal transfer between this programme and other first-degree programmes in the School.

Careers & opportunities

In this section

Graduate employers

Graduates from this course have gained employment with a wide range of organisations. Here are some examples:

  • Citi
  • Deloitte
  • Northern Ireland Civil Service
  • Oxford Economics
  • Ulster University Economic Policy Centre
  • PWC

Job roles

Graduates from this course are employed in many different roles. Here are some examples:

  • Accountants
  • Assistant Economist
  • Economist
  • Stockbroker
  • Research Analyst
  • Data Analyst
  • Compliance Officer

Career options

Previous Economics graduates have gone into careers in business, financial and public sectors locally, nationally and globally. Recent graduates have taken up careers as consultants in accountancy firms, recruitment consultants, economic researchers, trainee accountants, business management, stockbroking and financial services.

Work placement / study abroad

The programme has the option for either a work placement or study abroad between the second and final years.

Apply

Applications for full time undergraduate courses are made through UCAS

https://www.ucas.com/.

How to apply

Start dates

  • September 2016

Fees and funding

In this section

Fees (per year)

Northern Ireland & EU:
£3,925.00
England, Scotland & Wales:
£6,000.00
International:
£12,890.00

Scholarships, awards and prizes

In first year, there is a prize for the best mark in the Accounting for Business module across the Economics/Business Economics family of programmes.

In final year, there is a prize for the best overall (average) mark across the Economics/Business Economics family of programmes.

Additional mandatory costs

Tuition fees and costs associated with accommodation, travel and normal living are a part of university life. 

Where a course has additional mandatory expenses we make every effort to highlight them in the online prospectus. These may include residential visits, field trips, materials (e.g. art, design, engineering) inoculations, security checks, computer equipment, uniforms, professional memberships etc.

We aim to provide students with the learning materials needed to support their studies. Our libraries are a valuable resource with an extensive collection of books and journals as well as first-class facilities and IT equipment. Computer suites and free wifi is also available on each of the campuses.

There will be some additional costs to being a student which cannot be itemised and these will be different for each student. You may choose to purchase your own textbooks and course materials or prefer your own computer and software. Printing and binding may also be required. There are additional fees for graduation ceremonies, examination resits and library fines. Additional costs vary from course to course. 

Students choosing a period of paid work placement or study abroad as part of their course should be aware that there may be additional travel and living costs as well as tuition fees. 

Please contact the course team for more information.

Contact

Department Office Contact Details

T: +44 (0) 28 9036 6906

E: accounting@ulster.ac.uk

Course Director:Dr Mark Bailey

T: +44 (0) 28 9036 8254

E: mf.bailey@ulster.ac.uk