Music with History

BA (Hons)

2022/23 Part-time Undergraduate course

Award:

Bachelor of Arts with Honours

Faculty:

Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

School:

School of Arts and Humanities

Campus:

Magee campus

Start date:

September 2022

With this degree you could become:

  • Arts Officer
  • Entrepreneur
  • Manager
  • Music Producer
  • Musician
  • Teacher
  • Venue Manager

Overview

Combine Music with History to maximise your potential as a creative and analytical professional.

Summary

As a Major student in Music, you choose modules to the value of 40 credits in each semester from the pathways in Musicology and Performance Studies. You then take modules to the value of 20 credits in each semester in History. Here, you develop a wide range of written, verbal, and analytical skills through the study of the historical processes that have shaped modern society. You will explore topics such as Film and the Vietnam War, Witchcraft and Magic, the Russian Revolution, United States’ Foreign Policy and many more.

History at Ulster will develop a wide range of written, verbal, and analytical skills through the study of the historical processes that have shaped modern society. You will explore topics such as Film and the Vietnam War, Witchcraft and Magic, the Russian Revolution, United States’ Foreign Policy and many more.

On the Minor History pathway, we present History in unique and exciting ways, across a range of topics and settings. Rather than traditional lectures and seminars, you will learn mainly in interactive workshops; you will create podcasts and digital presentations, design websites, organise conferences and produce research portfolios.


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About this course

About

Within the Music Major pathway

Year 1 is designed to provide you with a comprehensive overview of musical styles, genres and disciplines enabling you to develop existing skills and interests as well as acquire a range of new ones. Musicology 1 and 2 both include strands in fundamental harmony while Performance Studies 1 and 2 include an Aural provision.

Year 2 allows you the opportunity to begin specialising by introducing a number of optional modules as well as level 2 modules in the four core disciplines. Musicology 3 and 4 – the only compulsory modules - both include strands in advanced harmony.

Year 3 enables you to focus your degree programme in one or more related areas of specialist interest with a broad range of advanced level modules. Placement presents the opportunity to take part in an internship with a local music or arts organisation while the Project options allow you to pursue an independent course of research or practical work in a chosen field of musical study.

Attendance

Tutor-led classes take place over two 12 week semesters per academic year, with a further three weeks in each semester assigned to assessment. Taught classes are compulsory and you can expect to be class for up to 12 hours per week. In addition, you are expected to undertake a wide range of independent work, including: individual preparation, group work, reading, rehearsal and performance. There are also many opportunities for extra-curricular activities and support that will enrich your experience with us.

Start dates

  • September 2022

Teaching, Learning and Assessment

Learning and teaching methods include lectures, tutorials, seminars, practical workshops, group work, projects, rehearsals and production meetings. Particularly at Levels 5 and 6, divisions between these class types dissolve and an individual session with a tutor may involve a range of student-tutor activities. Tutor-led classes provide the core structure and support on individual modules, but the emphasis in learning remains on the student’s independent engagement with the scope of the module. Students are routinely expected, therefore, to prepare in advance for taught sessions.

Digital resources are used to support students’ learning, made available primarily through the University's VLE, Blackboard Learn. Students are supported in using these resources from their Level 4 induction programme onwards through dedicated training sessions, support handouts and manuals and online tutorials.

Assessments include essays, presentations, performances, literature reviews, dissertations, workshop demonstrations, compositions, portfolios, and podcasts. While there are a relatively small number of summative assessments for any module (normally two, a maximum of three), these are supported by a range of opportunities for formative feedback.

The content for each course is summarised on the relevant course page, along with an overview of the modules that make up the course.

Each course is approved by the University and meets the expectations of:

Attendance and Independent Study

As part of your course induction, you will be provided with details of the organisation and management of the course, including attendance and assessment requirements - usually in the form of a timetable. For full-time courses, the precise timetable for each semester is not confirmed until near the start date and may be subject to change in the early weeks as all courses settle into their planned patterns. For part-time courses which require attendance on particular days and times, an expectation of the days of attendance will often be included in the letter of offer. A course handbook is also made available.

Courses comprise modules for which the notional effort involved is indicated by its credit rating. Each credit point represents 10 hours of student effort. Undergraduate courses typically contain 10- or 20-credit modules and postgraduate course typically 15- or 30-credit modules.

The normal study load expectation for an undergraduate full-time course of study in the standard academic year is 120 credit points. This amounts to around 36-42 hours of expected teaching and learning per week, inclusive of attendance requirements for lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical work, fieldwork or other scheduled classes, private study, and assessment. Part-time study load is the same as full-time pro-rata, with each credit point representing 10 hours of student effort.

Postgraduate Masters courses typically comprise 180 credits, taken in three semesters when studied full-time. A Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) comprises 60 credits and can usually be completed on a part-time basis in one year. A 120-credit Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) can usually be completed on a part-time basis in two years.

Class contact times vary by course and type of module. Typically, for a module predominantly delivered through lectures you can expect at least 3 contact hours per week (lectures/seminars/tutorials). Laboratory classes often require a greater intensity of attendance in blocks. Some modules may combine lecture and laboratory. The precise model will depend on the course you apply for and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. Prospective students will be consulted about any significant changes.

Assessment

Assessment methods vary and are defined explicitly in each module. Assessment can be via one method or a combination e.g. examination and coursework . Assessment is designed to assess your achievement of the module’s stated learning outcomes. You can expect to receive timely feedback on all coursework assessment. The precise assessment will depend on the module and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

Coursework can take many forms, for example: essay, report, seminar paper, test, presentation, dissertation, design, artefacts, portfolio, journal, group work. The precise form and combination of assessment will depend on the course you apply for and the module. Details will be made available in advance through induction, the course handbook, the module specification and the assessment timetable. The details are subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

Normally, a module will have four learning outcomes, and no more than two items of assessment. An item of assessment can comprise more than one task. The notional workload and the equivalence across types of assessment is standardised.

Calculation of the Final Award

The class of Honours awarded in Bachelor’s degrees is usually determined by calculation of an aggregate mark based on performance across the modules at Levels 5 and 6 (which correspond to the second and third year of full-time attendance).

Level 6 modules contribute 70% of the aggregate mark and Level 5 contributes 30% to the calculation of the class of the award. Classification of integrated Masters degrees with Honours include a Level 7 component. The calculation in this case is: 50% Level 7, 30% Level 6, 20% Level 5. At least half the Level 5 modules must be studied at the University for Level 5 to be included in the calculation of the class.

All other qualifications have an overall grade determined by results in modules from the final level of study. In Masters degrees of more than 200 credit points the final 120 points usually determine the overall grading.

Figures correct for academic year 2019-2020.

Academic profile

This course is taught by leading Music scholars and historians. We publish books and articles, create digital content, make performances and provide expert analysis for national and international media outlets.

The specialisms of Music staff include: composition; musicology; new music; sound technology; and a wide range of performance traditions including jazz, contemporary; orchestral; and Irish traditional.

Some recent examples of the work of our specialist staff in History include:

  • Dr Ian Miller was lead creator of the medical history digital learning resource, ‘Epidemic Belfast’: https://epidemic-belfast.com
  • Dr Andrew Sneddon was the historical consultant for and contributor to the BBCNI and TG4 television series, An Diabhal Inti (The Devil’s in Her): http://paulamkehoe.com/#/witches-ireland/
  • Dr Leanne McCormick leads the ‘Bad Bridget’ project exploring the lives of criminal and deviant Irish women in North America which has featured on the BBC, RTE, The Guardian, The Irish Times and many more: https://badbridget.wordpress.com

The University employs over 1,000 suitably qualified and experienced academic staff - 59% have PhDs in their subject field and many have professional body recognition.

Courses are taught by staff who are Professors (25%), Readers, Senior Lecturers (20%) or Lecturers (55%).

We require most academic staff to be qualified to teach in higher education: 82% hold either Postgraduate Certificates in Higher Education Practice or higher. Most academic staff (81%) are accredited fellows of the Higher Education Academy (HEA) by Advanced HE - the university sector professional body for teaching and learning. Many academic and technical staff hold other professional body designations related to their subject or scholarly practice.

The profiles of many academic staff can be found on the University’s departmental websites and give a detailed insight into the range of staffing and expertise.  The precise staffing for a course will depend on the department(s) involved and the availability and management of staff.  This is subject to change annually and is confirmed in the timetable issued at the start of the course.

Occasionally, teaching may be supplemented by suitably qualified part-time staff (usually qualified researchers) and specialist guest lecturers. In these cases, all staff are inducted, mostly through our staff development programme ‘First Steps to Teaching’. In some cases, usually for provision in one of our out-centres, Recognised University Teachers are involved, supported by the University in suitable professional development for teaching.

Figures correct for academic year 2021-2022.

Magee campus

Accommodation

Enjoy student life in one of Europe's most vibrant cities.

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Sports Facilities

Our facilities in Magee cater for many sports ranging from archery to volleyball, and are open to students and members of the public all year round.

Find out more - information about sport  


Student Wellbeing

At Student Wellbeing we provide many services to help students through their time at Ulster University.

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Magee Campus Location

Campus Address

Ulster University,
Northland Rd,
Londonderry
BT48 7JL

T: 02870 123 456

Modules

Here is a guide to the subjects studied on this course.

Courses are continually reviewed to take advantage of new teaching approaches and developments in research, industry and the professions. Please be aware that modules may change for your year of entry. The exact modules available and their order may vary depending on course updates, staff availability, timetabling and student demand. Please contact the course team for the most up to date module list.

Year one

Musicology 1

Year: 1

Musicology 1 introduces students to the nature of musicological enquiry. Its purpose is to develop students' familiarity with important areas of musical activity, trends and genres, and to address some of the major issues in relation to the study and performance of Western Art and Popular Music. The module also enables students to develop fundamental skills in the study of tonal harmony.

Musicology 2

Year: 1

In this module students will be introduced to the study of Irish traditional music and the evolution of early jazz.The study of fundamental harmony introduced in Musicology 1 will be continued with emphasis on early jazz.

Irish Government and Politics since 1922

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module investigates the primary forces shaping Irish politics, political institutions and structures, political behaviour, the mass media and policy making.

Making History: Skills for Historians

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module is designed to introduce students to the practical skills required for studying history at degree level and the methods and approaches that inform historical practice.

Defining America: Themes in American History, C17th -C20th

Year: 1

This module is optional

The module will illustrate and analyse the key themes and issues in American history from colonial times to the present day. Patterns and problems in the development of America will be discussed, and consideration of differing interpretations and source evaluations are implicit throughout the course. By the end of the module students should understand how the history of America has been shaped by the key events and debates that have taken place over the last four hundred years.

The Making of Modern Britain, 1750-1945

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module provides a comprehensive introduction to the history of modern Britain. It explores key themes such as industrialisation and urbanisation; reform and revolution; class and identity; religion, nationalism and unionism; war and empire. It utilises the latest historical scholarship and key primary sources delivered by research-active scholars via innovative lectures and seminars. The module brings to light the key events and historical processes which have shaped the Britain and Ireland of today.

'The Age of Extremes': International History 1914-2014

Year: 1

This module is optional

The purpose of this module is to provide Level 4 History students with an introduction to some of the main developments in world and international history from the First World War onwards. It is one of a number of broad, survey courses, designed to provide the basis for further, more detailed, study in subsequent years.

Ireland, 1798-1998: Union and Disunion

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module examines key themes in Irish social and political history from the Act of Union to the Revolutionary period. Students will gain knowledge of important events such as the Famine, Land Wars, Easter Rising and War of Independence.

Year two

Performance Studies 1

Year: 2

This module introduces the student to a variety of approaches relating to the study of musical performance, promotes self-awareness and provides a broad context for further development. It is designed to develop current levels of aural awareness and serve as an introduction to improvisation as a means by which musicians may generate and develop musical ideas spontaneously, without reliance on a score

Performance Studies 2

Year: 2

This module builds on the skills acquired in MUS102, develops self-awareness, and encourages students to advance their understanding and appreciation of artistic qualities that characterise musical performances. Students are encouraged to make relevant connections between the skills developed here and within other areas of the programme

Disenchanted Land? Culture and Society in Early Modern Europe

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module will explore the structures of society in early-modern Europe, and the nature of early-modern social mentalities, daily social realities and material culture, cultural attitudes towards the natural world, varieties of religious belief and practice, and the supernatural in the early modern period: from notions in Heaven and Hell, to Angels, demons, witchcraft and magic. It will trace the effect on these beliefs and attitudes by the social, intellectual and cultural shifts associated with the Enlightenment.

War and Peace: the Ying and Yang of human history

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module is designed to help fill a still largely existent gap in human historiography by introducing students to the other side of the coin of human development: the human 'instinctive imperative' towards peace and through contrasting this with the roots of war, promote an understanding of the patterns in war and peace & advancement in the course of human history, with a particular focus on the post-1648, post-1815, post-World War One, post-World War Two and post-Cold War/post-9/11 periods.

Film and the Vietnam Conflict

Year: 2

This module is optional

The module explores the history, media, film and political culture in the context of America's involvement in the Vietnam War. The module explores major debates in the historiography of the era. Film representations of the war are subject to scrutiny for what they reveal about American society, and how they depict the changing perspectives of the "history" of the conflict. The module also follows the way in which the war developed and the changing attitudes it provoked at home and abroad.

Year three

Creative Computing

Year: 3

This module is optional

This module is designed for students who wish to develop their practice in interactive systems for live digital music or visual performance, application prototype and/or installation work.

Family, Sexuality and the State 1850-1925

Year: 3

This module is optional

This module examines the role of the state in molding the history of the family and sexuality in Britain between 1860-1925. It looks at the forces which have influenced state policy as well as the impact on issues such as prostitution, homosexuality, gender roles and childhood.

Politics and Society in early modern Britain and Ireland

Year: 3

This module is optional

The module tracks the emergence of an internationally powerful British nation state by examining key issues and events from c.1630-1730. It will explore governance in contested kingdoms and diverse societies, the rise of the fiscal-military state and parliamentary monarchy, religious confessionalism and religious pluralism. It will also examine the early modern family, the emergence of the middle class, social and economic improvement, and the Early Enlightenment.

The Irish Diaspora 1607-1939

Year: 3

This module is optional

A chronological and thematic module which explores the main patterns of Irish migration since 1607, and examines reasons for migration, emigrants' journeys, processes of adjustment, and also the development of the local, national and transnational socio-cultural, religious and political structures which together comprised an Irish Diaspora.

The Great Powers and the Middle East since 1880

Year: 3

This module is optional

This module explores the impact of the West on the Middle East and its contribution to conflict in the region since the end of the 19th Century.

Ireland and the European Union, 1961-2016

Year: 3

This module is optional

Ireland and Europe examines the reasons for Ireland's application to join the EEC, the interests informing its European policy, and the impact of the EU on Irish politics, administration, and society. There is a specific emphasis on key policy areas such as foreign policy, neutrality, cross-border co-operation, regional cohesion, and the Common Agricultural Policy. The module also explains the functions of the main EU institutions and their relation to member states, and examines the politics of the integration process and its implications for member states.

The Myth and Reality of Imperial Spain, 1492-1700

Year: 3

This module is optional

This course examines the rise to power of the Spanish Empire in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, and its subsequent decline from the seventeenth century onwards. The following issues will be emphasized: Spain's Empire building; the image of Spain in the European political discourse; the military, economic, and social crises of the seventeenth century; the Spanish Golden age in art and literature vis-à-vis the concept of decadence; the importance of honor and religion in all realms of society; the racial issue: from the convivencia to the Inquisition; the court of the Habsburgs; and the cultural impact of Spain in the early modern world. In addition, the course will consider the diverse populations constituting the Spanish World, stressing such social and cultural strains as those between: center (Castille), and periphery (for example, Catalonia, Naples, and The Netherlands); Christians and converted Jews/Muslims; Spanish Conquistadores and indigenous populations; and the various racial castes created in the Americas.

Death, Disease, and Medicine in Britain, 1800-1914

Year: 3

This module is optional

This module introduces students to key themes and topics on the history of death and illness in the long nineteenth century. Drawing from social, medical and Victorian history, students will explore themes such as murder in the Victorian city, ghosts, asylums, suicide, Victorian funerals and bodysnatching. Students will examine interdisciplinary sources including literature and art, as well as standard historical sources.

Revolutionary Russia, 1894-1939

Year: 3

This module is optional

This module examines Revolutionary Russia from the last Romanov ruler through to the establishment of Stalinism in the USSR. Key historiographical debates will be examined and assessed. The political, economic, and social and cultural aspects of this period will be covered.

'Good Trouble': Struggle, Resistance and the African American Experience

Year: 3

This module is optional

Race remains one of the most contentious issues in United States society. It has had a profound impact on America's domestic political process and culture and the way in which the US is perceived by the rest of the world. This module seeks to provide insight and understanding into the questions raised by the African American struggle and race relations in America and the continuing problems faced by Black Americans. The module proceeds chronologically through Black history from slavery through to the present day. This module also assesses the cultural contribution of African Americans in the United States in the twentieth century, and explores the legacy of the slave experience. It is interdisciplinary in method and will examine such issues as rebellion and assimilation, black nationalism, family, gender, film and popular culture.

Musicology 3

Year: 3

This module is optional

This module engages with a cross-section of musicological and performance-practice issues in the study of nineteenth-century Western Art Music and Contemporary Classical Music.

Electronic/Electroacoustic Composition

Year: 3

This module is optional

This module introduces students to the key theoretical principles, creative practices and tools for electronic/electroacoustic music production, in addition to other sonic arts and sound design activities.

Musicology 4

Year: 3

This module is optional

This module builds on the perspectives established in Musicology 3, and provides students with both a broad appraisal of Irish traditional music, song and dance and specific explorations of music in a variety of styles as well as advanced harmony skills and an insight into popular music aesthetics/experimental pop.

Sound Recording and Studio Techniques

Year: 3

This module is optional

This module provides an overview of the studio environment and of the techniques involved in the different stages of modern music production.

Introduction to Music Business

Year: 3

This module is optional

This module will give students an understanding of key working practices, skills and national and international organisations relevant to the music business. It will provide students with a set of practical skills to equip them as professional practitioners within the music industry

Year four

Industrial Placement

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module provides students with the opportunity to experience life as a professional in the creative industries as a paid employee of a company. They will be expected to conduct themselves professionally being an employee of a company and an ambassador for the University during this period. They will be supported by an academic coordinator.

Late Soviet Communism, 1953-1991

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module examines the attempts of the post-Stalin leadership to manage, reform, and improve the prosperity of Soviet domestic communism. The political, economic, and social and cultural policies of the three main general secretaries - Khrushchev, Brezhnev, and Gorbachev - will be examined and assessed critically.

Royal Splendours: Politics, Culture, and Patronage in the Courts of Europe, 1450-1715

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module will trace the evolution of early modern courts from Burgundy in the 15th century to Louis XIV's Versailles in the 17th century. The following issues will be emphasized: the interaction of the ruler with the courtiers through the unique prism of the various mechanisms that constructed ceremonial and etiquette; the communication of the court with wider strata of the population via the magnificent spectacles and festivities that were organized to aggrandize such ruling houses as the Habsburgs, the Bourbons and the Tudors; the extravagance of royal patronage, and the use of such luxury products as: art, fashion, and finery. In geographical terms, most of the emphasis will be put on the Spanish and French courts, which presented the principal models of kingship and courtly culture that were emulated by the rest of the courts of Europe. In addition, it will examine how these models influenced some of the more interesting case-studies in the Italian peninsula, such as the Papal court, the court of the Medici, and the viceregal court of Naples.

Imperial Retreat: The Decline and Fall of the European Overseas Empires

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module will examine the historical process since 1945 whereby European colonial powers either withdrew or were driven from formal occupation of their overseas possessions. The module will not only examine various interpretations of imperial disengagement but will also provide an in-depth study of the actual mechanics of European decolonisation for particular territories in South and South East Asia, Africa and the Pacific. It also aims to enhance student skills in evaluating interpretations put forward by historians through allowing them to make a detailed study of one particular colonial possession.

Performance studies 3

Year: 4

This module is optional

In this module students increase their knowledge of repertoire and performance styles and develop a range of performance and performance-related skills.

Performance studies 4

Year: 4

This module is optional

In this module students develop their individual strengths in performance, their critical faculties and their awareness of the visual dimensions of performance

Composition and Orchestration 3

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module develops students' composing and orchestrating skills, provides opportunity for them to engage with, focus their study on, a range of 20th century and contemporary scores, and facilitates their composition of original musical works

Composition and Orchestration 4

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module is geared towards consolidating and developing composing and orchestrating skills as acquired in Composition and Orchestration 3, and channelling them towards the production of a large-scale original composition and orchestration.

Introduction to Music in the Community

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module will introduce the role of the musician in community arts, exploring skills which will equip students to participate in all aspects of community-based arts projects

Music and Moving Image

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module provides students with a historical, theoretical, stylistic and aesthetic study of music and moving image and the opportunity to compose for the screen. The module focuses primarily on film music and its genres but also covers other screen media, in particular music video and music for television. The module is divided between theoretical and analytical work, including the discussion of selected case studies, and practical work composing and editing in the lab.

Experimental Music

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module will introduce students to the key historical, practical, theoretical, and aesthetic themes associated with experimental music composition and performance.

Year five

'Changed, Changed Utterly': The Irish Revolution, 1913-1923.

Year: 5

This module is optional

This module utilises documentary, digital, and audio-visual sources to explore life in Ireland during the revolutionary years, 1913-1923. The period is brought to life through narratives of key events and the analysis of primary source material from the time.

United States Foreign Policy Since 1945

Year: 5

This module is optional

This module provides a comprehensive overview of US Foreign Policy since 1945. It considers the United States' place in the global political structure. It will examine defining moments in the history of US Foreign Policy, including the Cold War, Post-Cold War, and post-September 11th eras, analysing the administrations of Presidents from Harry S. Truman to Barack Obama.

Saints and Sinners: Women in Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Ireland

Year: 5

This module is optional

This module will use the study of women in Irish society from 1850-2000 to consider the role of women in areas such as politics, religion, culture, work and sexuality and how their role and experiences changed over the period. It will allow students to gain an alternative historical perspective on the major political and societal changes of the period. Though the use of oral history students will gain a personal understanding of female experience in the past.

Workers and radicalism in modern Ireland, 1800-1939

Year: 5

This module is optional

This module investigates the evolution of the working class in Ireland, and its interaction with capital, labour organization, society, and politics.

America in the Depression, 1929-1941

Year: 5

This module is optional

This is an interdisciplinary study of one of the most significant events in the history of the United States since 1900, the Depression that began in 1929 and lasted until the USA entered the Second World War in 1941. This course will examine the turbulent years of the Great Depression and the New Deal. It will cover political, social, economic, and cultural aspects of the events and circumstances that led to the Depression, the election of FDR in 1933, and the formulation of the New Deal as national policy. It will then look at various aspects of New Deal policies and will assess the achievements and limitations of those policies.

The Post-War Body: Medicine and Society in Britain and America, c.1945-90

Year: 5

This module is optional

This module examines the dramatic changes in experiences of health and illness that occurred in the twentieth century. Focusing on Britain and America, it explores how our attitudes to matters such as sex, death, eating, disability and mental health were revolutionized in the twentieth century. The module also looks at ethical problems issues such as Cold War human experimentation. Students will engage with broader themes such as class, gender and race relations.

Project 1

Year: 5

This module is optional

This module will allow students to develop the skills necessary to undertake and complete a research project, allowing them to pursue in depth a particular topic, agreed with a supervisor, in which they have a particular interest.

Project 2

Year: 5

This module is optional

This module will allow students to develop the skills necessary to undertake and complete a research project, allowing them to pursue in depth a particular topic, agreed with a supervisor, in which they have a particular interest.

Jazz in the United States

Year: 5

This module is optional

This modules explores the development of Jazz in the United States in the twentieth century using a range of critical and analytical techniques.

Double Project

Year: 5

This module is optional

This module will allow students to develop the skills necessary to undertake and complete a research project, allowing them to pursue in depth a particular topic, agreed with a supervisor, in which they have a particular interest.

Music and Moving Image

Year: 5

This module is optional

This module provides students with a historical, theoretical, stylistic and aesthetic study of music and moving image and the opportunity to compose for the screen. The module focuses primarily on film music and its genres but also covers other screen media, in particular music video and music for television. The module is divided between theoretical and analytical work, including the discussion of selected case studies, and practical work composing and editing in the lab.

Performance Studies 5

Year: 5

This module is optional

In this module students may focus on repertoire/styles in which they have demonstrated particular strengths. They enhance their performance profile through involvement in a range of performance-related activities.

Year six

Sound Theory/Sound Practice

Year: 6

This module is optional

This module develops the learner's understanding of the key role the `forgotten' medium of sound has in contemporary media and in our everyday lived experience. Learning will be grounded in an historical overview of the development of sound study, sound technology and the principal sound art projects of the last 150 years. This grounding will be used to encourage students to develop their own analyses of the ways in which sound frames and permeates our everyday lives and to create their own sound productions informed by these perspectives.

Witchcraft and magic in early modern Europe and Colonial New England, c.1550-1780

Year: 6

This module is optional

The early modern period is often seen as the era of the European 'witch-panic', which saw around 40,000 people executed for the crime of witchcraft. This module will examine the many facets of the witchcraft experience in Europe and New England using a variety of contemporary sources: from images and printed books and pamphlets, to court records and private correspondence. It will examine patterns of witchcraft accusation and prosecution, the intellectual context of witchcraft beliefs, the connection between witchcraft and women, the decline in educated belief, and the continuation of popular notions and traditions. Early modern witchcraft will also be located in its wider magical context by exploring both popular magic. Developments in witchcraft and magic in the early modern period will also be linked to wider societal, cultural and religious changes.

Performance Studies 6

Year: 6

This module is optional

This module is designed for students who have displayed the potential to pursue performance to a level of artistic excellence.

Conversations in Irish Traditional Music

Year: 6

This module is optional

The module will provide students with an overview of the sounds, conversation, communities and contexts of traditional musics in Ireland with a view to developing critical thinking and commentary skills in relation to issues raised.

Composition Portfolio 1

Year: 6

This module is optional

This Module is intended to encourage and empower the student to compose medium scale (6-10 minute) works demonstrating a variety of creative approaches and skills.

Composition Portfolio 2

Year: 6

This module is optional

This module is geared towards developing compositional skills the student has acquired in MUS517 Composition Portfolio 1, and channelling them towards the production of two large scale pieces of music.

Advanced Audio Production

Year: 6

This module is optional

This module is designed for students who wish to pursue advanced study in audio production.

Placement 1

Year: 6

This module is optional

This module allows students to spend a period of time working outside the university in a suitable music or arts organisation.

Placement 2

Year: 6

This module is optional

This module allows students to spend a period of time working outside the university in a suitable music or arts organisation.

Teaching Music in the Community

Year: 6

This module is optional

This module introduces students to the practice of teaching music outside the formal school environment. It considers practical supports to help build skills in the planning, delivery and monitoring of teaching, and to encourage future teachers to become reflective in their practice. It also introduces students to the entrepreneurial context in which such teaching in the community is often situated.

Standard entry conditions

We recognise a range of qualifications for admission to our courses. In addition to the specific entry conditions for this course you must also meet the University’s General Entrance Requirements.

A level

The A Level requirement for this course is

Grades CCC to include Music.

Applicants may satisfy the requirement for the final A level grade in the above grade profiles by substituting a combination of alternative qualifications to the same standard as defined by the University.

If you do not meet the requirement for a qualification in Music, please contact us and we can discuss how we might recognise your prior experience in the area in assessing your application.

Alternatives to A level Music: a recognised Diploma (e.g. LRAM, ARCM, LRSM, ARCO, LTCL, LGSM, LLCM, RIAM) OR Grade 8 practical together with Grade 8 theory (preferably at distinction) is required. Further alternative qualifications to satisfy the Music entry requirement are stipulated within the other qualifications sections.

Please note that all applicants for the degree course may be interviewed and auditioned by Music as part of our entry criteria. Although we expect candidates to be able to demonstrate a high level of performing ability, at this stage we are evaluating potential as much as achievement.

Applied General Qualifications

Overall BTEC award profile

*** To note that only qualifications defined as “Applied General” will be accepted for entry onto any undergraduate course at Ulster University.***

BTEC Awards

QCF Pearson BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma/ OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 Extended Diploma (2012 Suite)

Award profile of DMM

RQF Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma/ OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 Extended Diploma (2016 Suite)

Award profile of MMM

Acceptable Music awards = Performing Arts (Musical Theatre), Music and Music Technology (preferably with Grade 5 Theory). Other Extended Diplomas will be considered if candidates can satisfy the A level Music Grade B or equivalent subject requirement.

QCF Pearson BTEC Level 3 Diploma/ OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 Diploma(2012 Suite)

Award profile of DM plus A Level Grade C or award profile of DM plus A Level Grade C

RQF Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Diploma/ OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 Diploma (2016 Suite)

Award profile of MM plus A Level Grade C

The subject requirement for this course is A level Grade B or equivalent in Music. If the Diploma is in an acceptable Music award then the A level may be achieved at Grade C

QCF Pearson BTEC Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma / OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 Introductory Diploma (2012 Suite)

Award profile of Merit plus A Level Grades CC to include Music

RQF Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate/ OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 Extended Certificate (2016 Suite)

Award profile of Merit plus A Level Grades CC to include Music

Grade profiles (equating to the final A level grade stated in the standard 3A level offer profile - Grade C) may be substituted by a combination of alternative qualifications to the same standard as defined by the University.

If you do not meet the requirement for a qualification in Music, please contact us and we can discuss how we might recognise your prior experience in the area in assessing your application.

Irish Leaving Certificate

Overall Irish Leaving Certificate profile

96 UCAS tariff points to include a minimum of five subjects (four of which must be at higher level) to include English at H6 if studied at Higher level or O4 if studied at Ordinary Level.

This course also requires you to achieve H4 or above in Music.

Please note that all applicants for the degree course may be interviewed and auditioned as part of our entry criteria. RIAM qualifications will also be considered in lieu of H4 Music.

"If you do not meet the requirement for a qualification in Music, please contact us and we can discuss how we might recognise your prior experience in the area in assessing your application."

Irish Leaving Certificate UCAS Equivalency

Scottish Highers

The Scottish Highers requirement for this course is

CCCCC to include Music.

Applicants may satisfy the requirement for an element of the offer grade profiles (equating to the final A-level grade stated in the standard 3A level offer profile - Grade C) by substituting a combination of alternative qualifications to the same standard as defined by the University.

Please see other sections for alternative acceptable qualifications to Music grade C at Higher. Please note that all applicants for the degree course may be interviewed and auditioned as part of our entry criteria.

"If you do not meet the requirement for a qualification in Music, please contact us and we can discuss how we might recognise your prior experience in the area in assessing your application."

Scottish Advanced Highers

The Scottish Advanced Highers requirement for this course is

DDD to include Music

Applicants may satisfy the requirement for an element of the offer grade profiles (equating to the final A-level grade stated in the standard 3A level offer profile - Grade C) by substituting a combination of alternative qualifications to the same standard as defined by the University.

Please see other sections for alternative acceptable qualifications to Music Grade C at Advanced Higher. Please note that all applicants for the degree course may be interviewed and auditioned as part of our entry criteria.

"If you do not meet the requirement for a qualification in Music, please contact us and we can discuss how we might recognise your prior experience in the area in assessing your application."

International Baccalaureate

Overall International Baccalaureate profile minimum is 24 points (including 12 at higher level)to include Music at HL5

Please see other sections for alternative acceptable qualifications to satisfy the Music subject requirements. Please note that all applicants for the degree course may be interviewed and auditioned as part of our entry criteria. If you do not meet the requirement for a qualification in Music, please contact us and we can discuss how we might recognise your prior experience in the area in assessing your application.

Access to Higher Education (HE)

Overall profile of 55% (120 credit Access Course) (NI Access course)

Overall profile of 45 credits at Merit (60 credit Access course) (GB Access course)

Please note that you must satisfy the requirement for Music Grade C (or equivalent)

Please see the other qualifications sections for acceptable qualifications to satisfy the Music subject requirements for this course. Please note that all applicants for the degree course may be interviewed and auditioned as part of our entry criteria. If you do not meet the requirement for a qualification in Music, please contact us and we can discuss how we might recognise your prior experience in the area in assessing your application.

GCSE

For full-time study, you must satisfy the General Entrance Requirements for admission to a first degree course and hold a GCSE pass at Grade C/4 or above English Language.

Level 2 Certificate in Essential Skills - Communication will be accepted as equivalent to GCSE English.

English Language Requirements

English language requirements for international applicants
The minimum requirement for this course is Academic IELTS 6.0 with no band score less than 5.5. Trinity ISE: Pass at level III also meets this requirement for Tier 4 visa purposes.

Ulster recognises a number of other English language tests and comparable IELTS equivalent scores.

Additional Entry Requirements

HND - Overall Merit with distinctions in 15 Level 5 credits entry to Year 1. Those applicants holding a subject-related HND with an overall Merit may be considered for entry to Year 2.

Music subject requirements are:

  • Music
  • Performing Arts (requires completion of Music strand).

HNC – Overall Merit with distinctions in 45 Level 4 credits for entry to Year 1.

Music subject requirements are:

  • Music
  • Performing Arts (requires completion of Music strand).

Candidates offering non-subject related HNC/HNDs will be considered if they achieve the Music subject requirements via other qualifications i.e. A level grade C or equivalent.

Foundation Degree - an overall mark of 40% in Level 5 modules for Year 1 entry. Those applicants holding a subject-related Foundation Degree may be considered for entry to Year 2.

Please see the other qualifications sections for alternative acceptable qualifications to satisfy the Music subject requirements for this course. Please note that all applicants for the degree course may be interviewed and auditioned as part of our entry criteria.If you do not meet the requirement for a qualification in Music, please contact us and we can discuss how we might recognise your prior experience in the area in assessing your application.

Advanced Entry

Those applicants seeking entry with advanced standing, (eg. Transfer from a cognate course at another institution or year 2 entry via cognate HND* or Foundation Degree*) will be considered on an individual basis but should note that this process can be more difficult in subject combination programmes as both subjects must be satisfied.

* normally Year 2 entry requires applicants to hold a course-related award plus a minimum of grade 5 Music Theory or demonstrate equivalent proficiency (equivalency to be determined via interview audition).

APEL (Accreditation of Prior Experiential Learning)

The University will consider applications on the basis of experiential learning for those who do not hold the normal entry qualifications.

Transfers - on an individual basis.

Exemptions and transferability

Applicants from other institutions should apply via UCAS. Applications will be considered on their individual merits.

Students may apply to transfer into the programme, having completed a Higher National Diploma. While the Northern Ireland Credit Accumulation and Transfer System (NICATS) allows for transfer into Level 6, this remains exceptional. In the experience of the Subject Team, HND students benefit from transfer into Level 5 as a period in which to firmly ground themselves within the approach to study at degree level. Where students seek to transfer into either Level 5 or Level 6, the application is assessed in terms of a written application, references and an interview. In some instances students may be required to complete written and/or practical tasks to allow them to demonstrate to the subject team the capacity to meet the Programme Learning Outcomes.

Students transferring into the programme from other BA programmes may be considered for entry at any level. The application is assessed in terms of interview, references, and the transcript from the student’s current HEI.

Careers & opportunities

Job roles

With this degree you could become:

  • Arts Officer
  • Entrepreneur
  • Manager
  • Music Producer
  • Musician
  • Teacher
  • Venue Manager

Career options

Studying Music with Historyprepares you for a range of careers both inside and outside of the music industry. Our Music students have been successful in establishing careers as composers and performers, studio engineers, teachers, community music leaders and many progress to postgraduate study at the University of Ulster and other domestic and international institutions. Our recent History graduates are working in media, education, civil service, retail, banking and finance, the heritage sector, in law, and many more.

Importantly the interdisciplinary opportunities afforded to Music with Historystudents across the School equips our graduates with a unique range of skills and experiences vital to any career in the creative industries that few other institutions can provide.

Work placement / study abroad

There are optional work placement modules and opportunities to study abroad.

Apply

Start dates

  • September 2022

Fees and funding

Module Pricing

The price of your overall programme will be determined by the number of credit points that you initiate in the relevant academic year.

For modules commenced in the academic year 2022/23, the following fees apply:

Module Pricing
Credit Points NI/ROI Cost GB Cost International Cost
120 £4,629.60 £9,249.60 £15,360
60  £2,314.80 £4,624.80 £7,680
30 £1,157.40 £2,312.40 £3,840
20  £771.60 £1,541.60£2,560

NB: A standard full-time undergraduate degree is equivalent to 120 credit points per year.

Additional mandatory costs

It is important to remember that costs associated with accommodation, travel (including car parking charges) and normal living will need to be covered in addition to tuition fees.

Where a course has additional mandatory expenses (in addition to tuition fees) we make every effort to highlight them above. We aim to provide students with the learning materials needed to support their studies. Our libraries are a valuable resource with an extensive collection of books and journals, as well as first-class facilities and IT equipment. Computer suites and free Wi-Fi are also available on each of the campuses.

There are additional fees for graduation ceremonies, examination resits and library fines.

Students choosing a period of paid work placement or study abroad as a part of their course should be aware that there may be additional travel and living costs, as well as tuition fees.

See the tuition fees on our student guide for most up to date costs.

Contact

Course Director: Dr Shaun Ryan

T: +44 (0)28 7167 5271

E: sp.ryan@ulster.ac.uk

Admissions Office - Claire Tinkler or Karen Gibson

E: cm.tinkler@ulster.ac.uk or ki.gibson@ulster.ac.uk

For more information visit

Disclaimer

  1. The University endeavours to deliver courses and programmes of study in accordance with the description set out in this prospectus. The University’s prospectus is produced at the earliest possible date in order to provide maximum assistance to individuals considering applying for a course of study offered by the University. The University makes every effort to ensure that the information contained in the prospectus is accurate but it is possible that some changes will occur between the date of printing and the start of the academic year to which it relates. Please note that the University’s website is the most up-to-date source of information regarding courses and facilities and we strongly recommend that you always visit the website before making any commitments.
  2. Although reasonable steps are taken to provide the programmes and services described, the University cannot guarantee the provision of any course or facility and the University may make variations to the contents or methods of delivery of courses, discontinue, merge or combine courses and introduce new courses if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Such circumstances include (but are not limited to) industrial action, lack of demand, departure of key staff, changes in legislation or government policy including changes, if any, resulting from the UK departing the European Union, withdrawal or reduction of funding or other circumstances beyond the University’s reasonable control.
  3. If the University discontinues any courses, it will use its best endeavours to provide a suitable alternative course. In addition, courses may change during the course of study and in such circumstances the University will normally undertake a consultation process prior to any such changes being introduced and seek to ensure that no student is unreasonably prejudiced as a consequence of any such change.
  4. The University does not accept responsibility (other than through the negligence of the University, its staff or agents), for the consequences of any modification or cancellation of any course, or part of a course, offered by the University but will take into consideration the effects on individual students and seek to minimise the impact of such effects where reasonably practicable.
  5. The University cannot accept any liability for disruption to its provision of educational or other services caused by circumstances beyond its control, but the University will take all reasonable steps to minimise the resultant disruption to such services.

Testimonials

Robert Hunter (recent History graduate)

‘I am really enjoying studying History at Ulster. It offers lots of interesting modules that cover a wide variety of eras and cultures, taught by helpful expert staff. It has taught me transferable skills such as how to analyse, interpret and present information that will be valuable when it comes to seeking employment after graduation. History at Ulster has also given me access to amazing travel opportunities. In my second year, I was awarded a bursary to work in the “In Flanders Fields Museum” in Ypres, Belgium for three weeks where I helped to digitise the records of Irish soldiers who died during the First World War’.

Karolina Stonkute (recent History graduate)

‘During my three years on the History course at Ulster, I have never felt unsupported. The History lecturers have continuously provided me with help whether it was academic or personal. They strive to push their students to achieve grades that they believe best represents their skills. I would not have the experience nor the confidence to enter the next chapter of my career without them.’

Orin McIvor (year 3 History)

‘At the end of my second year studying History at Ulster I applied for the ‘study abroad’ programme and spent a year at university in America. I had an incredible time. It was truly a life changing experience that boosted my self-esteem and confidence. It was amazing being able to experience different cultures and to meet people that I would become friends with that I would have had no opportunity to do so before. I miss the experience a little more every day and still catch up with the friends I made. It was an experience that I feel anybody with even a hint of interest in studying abroad should go for as they will not regret it’.