Drama with Marketing
BA (Hons)

2022/23 Full-time Undergraduate course

Award:

Bachelor of Arts with Honours

Faculty:

Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

School:

School of Arts and Humanities

Campus:

Magee campus

UCAS code:

W4N5
The UCAS code for Ulster University is U20

Start date:

September 2022

With this degree you could become:


  • Box Office Manager
  • Business Development Manager
  • marketing officer
  • venue manager

Graduates from this course are now working for:


  • BBC
  • Belfast Health and Social Care Trust
  • Big Telly Theatre Company
  • Kabosh Theatre Company
  • Tinderbox Theatre Company
  • Lyric Theatre
  • Primary and Secondary Schools

Overview

Explore contemporary performance and marketing to develop your creativity & critical thinking skills for a career in creative industries and beyond.

Summary

Studying Drama in combination with Education is an excellent introduction to a future career in the general education sector. It will provide you with an introduction to the main concepts of educational theory and practice in NI, the UK and internationally.

Drama in the School of Arts and Humanities provides an exciting and challenging programme with an emphasis on contemporary performance practices. Our approach to teaching and learning integrates theories and practices of performance in order to extend our understanding of Drama as an art form in its social, political and cultural contexts.

Our expert lecturing staff are internationally-recognised researchers with a range of industry-related experience. Students are able to take advantage of our nationally-acknowledged teaching expertise and will have opportunities to extend their experience of contemporary performance practices through contact with part time staff and key visiting lecturers. The Drama programmes benefit from extensive links with theatre practitioners and key Irish theatre companies, who use our spaces for performances and delivering practice-based workshops.


Drama allows students to learn in a rigorous and stimulating environment where they are encouraged to develop essential skills as thinking creative practitioners.

Each year semester students will take two modules in Drama and one in Marketing.

Marketing when taken as a minor is designed to provide students with an insight into the role of marketing in businesses. Students will have the opportunity to work with industry through applied projects. Topics students will study include Consumer Behaviour, Marketing Communications, International Marketing and Digital Marketing.

Marketing minor students have the opportunity during the final year of their degree or upon completion of their degree to work towards professional qualifications with either The Chartered Institute of Marketing of Marketing Institute of Ireland.


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About this course

About

This course will provide you with opportunities to learn from two disciplines, Drama and Education. As a result, you will have opportunities to develop a range of graduate qualities which will provide you with flexible and fluid skillsets for future study and employment.

The degree in Drama allows you to develop a broad base of knowledge of Drama practices and systematic approaches to the analysis of works in performance. You will be able to prepare yourself for the kinds of mosaic careers characteristic of the creative industries and increasingly common across a range of sectors.

There are particular areas of specialist practice that you can develop as you progress through each level of the degree. If you wish to pursue a creative career, although we do not provide full-time conservatoire training for actors, you can take modules that introduce you to the principles of acting, writing, directing, design, stage management, arts education and working with community groups. These can prepare you for further specialist professional training at post-graduate level.

You will develop a core set of academic skills in research, analysis and communication in written and oral formats. Alongside these, you will also develop transferable skills in group work, project management, problem solving and the use of key technologies.

Associate awards

Diploma in Professional Practice DPP

Diploma in International Academic Studies DIAS

Diploma in Professional Practice International DPPI

Find out more about placement awards

Attendance

Three years full time.

Students are expected to be in attendance during the normal working week. In line with the University’s attendance policy, attendance at all taught sessions is compulsory. In addition, students working on projects and in independent work may be required to attend for group meetings and rehearsals in the evenings and, occasionally, at weekends.

Start dates

  • September 2022

Teaching, Learning and Assessment

Learning and teaching methods include lectures, tutorials, seminars, practical workshops, group work, projects, rehearsals and production meetings. Particularly at Levels 5 and 6, divisions between these class types dissolve and an individual session with a tutor may involve a range of student-tutor activities. Tutor-led classes provide the core structure and support on individual modules, but the emphasis in learning remains on the student’s independent engagement with the scope of the module. Students are routinely expected, therefore, to prepare in advance for taught sessions.

Within this context, lectures are used selectively to introduce key concepts and practices with which students will engage. The emphasis in lectures at all levels is on an interactive learning process, often based on students' prior preparation, through in-class tasks, or engaging with students' existing cultural capital.

Seminars are the focal point for student-led discussion and engagement and students are required to prepare materials in advance and to follow-up issues independently as a response to this. Students may be required to undertake presentations or performances within the seminar format.

Practical workshops are used to explore and test concepts and practices and, as appropriate, to develop experiential knowledge, practical skills and techniques. In some instances this will be through the production of creative projects. These projects will be driven by a specific brief, and at Levels 5 and 6, such briefs are geared towards professional practice.

Tutorials are scheduled within modules to provide opportunities for face-to-face supervision; and where appropriate, feed-forward and feedback on assessed tasks.

Digital resources are used to support students’ learning, made available primarily through the University's VLE, Blackboard Learn. Students are supported in using these resources from their Level 4 induction programme onwards through dedicated training sessions, support handouts and manuals and online tutorials.

Group work is used within the taught settings and as a significant part of the independent learning process, particularly in areas of creative practical work. Students are given guidance and training in group work processes throughout the programme. Through negotiation and reflection within class they are supported in independent group working.

Assessment strategies include essays, presentations, performances, literature reviews, dissertations, workshop demonstrations, creative writing, reflective essays and vivas, portfolios, and websites. Assessment strategies are constructively aligned with learning outcomes for the module and programme overall. While there are a relatively small number of summative assessments for any module (normally two, a maximum of three), these are supported by a range of opportunities for formative feedback.

Dr Tom Maguireis a graduate of the universities of Edinburgh and Glasgow and is a Distinguished Teaching Fellow of the University. He teaches in the areas of contemporary performance and applied theatre. His research interests are in contemporary British and Irish theatre, particularly storytelling performance and Theatre for Young Audiences.

Dr Lisa Fitzpatrick studied at Trinity College Dublin, University College Dublin, and the University of Toronto. She teaches in areas of critical theory and contemporary theatre. Her research interests are: violence and performance, Irish theatre, Canadian drama, and gender and performance.

Dr Giuliano Campo is an Italian performer, director and writer whose research and teaching interests include actor training and theatre anthropology. His works are published in several countries in different languages, such as Italian, Polish, English and Portuguese.

Dr Matthew Jennings has worked as an actor, musician, writer, director and facilitator in Australia, Ireland, the UK, Italy, Morocco and France. His research interests include: Applied and Community Drama; Performance and Health; Arts and Conflict Transformation; Arts Management and Cultural Policy

Content

The content for each course is summarised on the relevant course page, along with an overview of the modules that make up the course.

Each course is approved by the University and meets the expectations of:

Attendance and Independent Study

As part of your course induction, you will be provided with details of the organisation and management of the course, including attendance and assessment requirements - usually in the form of a timetable. For full-time courses, the precise timetable for each semester is not confirmed until close to the start date and may be subject to some change in the early weeks as all courses settle into their planned patterns. For part-time courses which require attendance on particular days and times, an expectation of the days and periods of attendance will be included in the letter of offer. A course handbook is also made available.

Courses comprise modules for which the notional effort involved is indicated by its credit rating. Each credit point represents 10 hours of student effort. Undergraduate courses typically contain 10- or 20-credit modules (more usually 20) and postgraduate course typically 15- or 30-credit modules.

The normal study load expectation for an undergraduate full-time course of study in the standard academic year is 120 credit points. This amounts to around 36-42 hours of expected teaching and learning per week, inclusive of attendance requirements for lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical work, fieldwork or other scheduled classes, private study, and assessment. Part-time study load is the same as full-time pro-rata, with each credit point representing 10 hours of student effort.

Postgraduate Master’s courses typically comprise 180 credits, taken in three semesters when studied full-time. A Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) comprises 60 credits and can usually be completed on a part-time basis in one year. A 120-credit Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) can usually be completed on a part-time basis in two years.

Class contact times vary by course and type of module. Typically, for a module predominantly delivered through lectures you can expect at least 3 contact hours per week (lectures/seminars/tutorials). Laboratory classes often require a greater intensity of attendance in blocks. Some modules may combine lecture and laboratory. The precise model will depend on the course you apply for and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. Prospective students will be consulted about any significant changes.

Assessment

Assessment methods vary and are defined explicitly in each module. Assessment can be a combination of examination and coursework but may also be only one of these methods. Assessment is designed to assess your achievement of the module’s stated learning outcomes. You can expect to receive timely feedback on all coursework assessment. The precise assessment will depend on the module and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

Coursework can take many forms, for example: essay, report, seminar paper, test, presentation, dissertation, design, artefacts, portfolio, journal, group work. The precise form and combination of assessment will depend on the course you apply for and the module. Details will be made available in advance through induction, the course handbook, the module specification and the assessment timetable. The details are subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

Normally, a module will have 4 learning outcomes, and no more than 2 items of assessment. An item of assessment can comprise more than one task. The notional workload and the equivalence across types of assessment is standardised.

Calculation of the Final Award

The class of Honours awarded in Bachelor’s degrees is usually determined by calculation of an aggregate mark based on performance across the modules at Levels 5 and 6, (which correspond to the second and third year of full-time attendance).

Level 6 modules contribute 70% of the aggregate mark and Level 5 contributes 30% to the calculation of the class of the award. Classification of integrated Master’s degrees with Honours include a Level 7 component. The calculation in this case is: 50% Level 7, 30% Level 6, 20% Level 5. At least half the Level 5 modules must be studied at the University for Level 5 to be included in the calculation of the class.

All other qualifications have an overall grade determined by results in modules from the final level of study. In Master’s degrees of more than 200 credit points the final 120 points usually determine the overall grading.

Academic profile

Dr Giuliano Campo is an Italian performer, director and writer whose research and teaching interests include actor training, world traditional disciplines of the self and theatre anthropology. His works are published in several countries in different languages. Giuliano is the Course Director for Drama.

Dr Tom Maguireis the Head of the School of Arts and Humanities. Heis a graduate of the universities of Edinburgh and Glasgow and is a Distinguished Teaching Fellow of the University. His research interests are in contemporary British and Irish theatre, particularly storytelling performance and Theatre for Young Audiences.

Dr Lisa Fitzpatrick studied at Trinity College Dublin, University College Dublin, and the University of Toronto. She teaches in areas of critical theory and contemporary theatre. Her research interests are: violence and performance, Irish theatre, Canadian drama, and gender and performance.

Dr Matthew Jennings has worked as an actor, musician, writer, director and facilitator in Australia, Ireland, the UK, Italy, Morocco and France. His research interests include: Applied and Community Drama; Performance and Health; Arts and Conflict Transformation; Arts Management and Cultural Policy

Dr Jennifer Goddard. Dr Goddard’s current work is in the area of Applied and Community Theatre; Disability and Performance; Multi-Sensory Theatre & Early Years Performance; Qualitative Arts Research; and Drama Facilitation & Facilitator Training. She continues to work closely with industry partners to develop research and community-based projects and provide consultation.

The University employs over 1,000 suitably qualified and experienced academic staff - 59% have PhDs in their subject field and many have professional body recognition.

Courses are taught by staff who are Professors (25%), Readers, Senior Lecturers (18%) or Lecturers (57%).

We require most academic staff to be qualified to teach in higher education: 82% hold either Postgraduate Certificates in Higher Education Practice or higher. Most academic staff (81%) are accredited fellows of the Higher Education Academy (HEA) - the university sector professional body for teaching and learning. Many academic and technical staff hold other professional body designations related to their subject or scholarly practice.

The profiles of many academic staff can be found on the University’s departmental websites and give a detailed insight into the range of staffing and expertise. The precise staffing for a course will depend on the department(s) involved and the availability and management of staff. This is subject to change annually and is confirmed in the timetable issued at the start of the course.

Occasionally, teaching may be supplemented by suitably qualified part-time staff (usually qualified researchers) and specialist guest lecturers. In these cases, all staff are inducted, mostly through our staff development programme ‘First Steps to Teaching’. In some cases, usually for provision in one of our out-centres, Recognised University Teachers are involved, supported by the University in suitable professional development for teaching.

Figures correct for academic year 2019-2020.

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Modules

Here is a guide to the subjects studied on this course.

Courses are continually reviewed to take advantage of new teaching approaches and developments in research, industry and the professions. Please be aware that modules may change for your year of entry. The exact modules available and their order may vary depending on course updates, staff availability, timetabling and student demand. Please contact the course team for the most up to date module list.

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