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International Travel and Tourism Management
BSc (Hons)

2021/22 Full-time Undergraduate course

Award:

Bachelor of Science with Honours

Faculty:

Ulster University Business School

School:

Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management

Campus:

Coleraine campus

UCAS code:

N800
The UCAS code for Ulster University is U20

With this degree you could become:


  • Airline Manager
  • Airport Operations
  • Digital Marketing Manager (Tourism)
  • Events Manager
  • Hotel Manager
  • Tourism Marketing Manager
  • Visitor Attraction Manager

Graduates from this course are now working for:


  • Aer Lingus
  • Disney
  • Emirates
  • Loch Lomond Golf Resort
  • Tourism Ireland
  • Tourism NI
  • Visit Britain

Overview

Developing business leaders for the vibrant, dynamic and evolving international travel and tourism sector.

Summary

Ulster University is ranked in the top 2 UK universities for Hospitality, Events and Tourism (Guardian University Guide 2020); 4th in The Complete University Guide UK (The Complete University Guide 2020) and 5th for Hospitality, Leisure, Recreation and Tourism in The Times/Sunday Times Good University Guide 2020 (The Times/Sunday Times, 2019).

The degree is designed to meet the needs of those who want to work in travel and tourism, which is now one of the world’s largest industries. You will develop a detailed knowledge of travel, tourism and the associated skills necessary for management in this evolving and dynamic sector that is highly customer focused and media influenced.

We have an award-winning team of academic staff with a wealth of knowledge and experience in research and industry across a range of areas in travel and tourism.


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Coleraine campus

Our coastal and riverside campus with a primary academic focus on science and health

About this course

About

The BSc (Hons) International Travel and Tourism is an internationally recognised passport to a successful management career in travel and tourism. International Travel and Tourism Management is for those who are passionate about travel, tourism, and who thrive in a fast paced and dynamic environment.

It is for those who aspire to work professionally in this exciting and expanding industry and who wish to learn all aspects from understanding tourism and the tourist, to developing and enhancing creativity and innovation through digital media. The four-year degree offers key business management subjects alongside specialist travel, tourism and events modules. You will enhance your knowledge in the key business management areas of strategy, marketing, finance, human resource management, operations management and entrepreneurship.

You will also gain valuable industry experience through a placement year, which offers a wide range of international opportunities.

100% of the teaching team have achieved Fellowship of the Higher Education Academy and 7 of these team members have Senior Fellowship of the Higher Education Academy.

Associate awards

Diploma in Professional Practice DPP

Diploma in Professional Practice International DPPI

Diploma in International Academic Studies DIAS

Find out more about placement awards

Attendance

Four years (including 48 week compulsory placement)

You will normally complete three modules per semester, with class contact time approximately three hours per week per module.

You will be expected to undertake independent study of around 10 hours per week per module.

You will have a minimum of 9-10 class contact hours per week on the Coleraine campus.

At the beginning of year 1, you are also expected to attend a two-day introductory induction to welcome you and help you settle into the course and the University campus environment.

Start dates

  • September 2021

Teaching, Learning and Assessment

Lectures provide you with the theoretical knowledge for all modular areas outlined in the course structure with practicals and seminars providing the opportunity to participate in hands on aspects and realistic scenarios in relation to the travel and tourism industry.

Regular talks and workshops from industry leaders provide further enhancement. You also have the opportunity to work on live industry projects and present your ideas and concepts to panels of industry experts, providing excellent opportunities to develop your creativity and innovation in relation to tourism. Assessment ranges from coursework in the form of reports and essays to exams, to live industry projects.

  • Read more

    Content

    The content for each course is summarised on the relevant course page, along with an overview of the modules that make up the course.

    Each course is approved by the University and meets the expectations of:

    • the relevant generic national Qualification Descriptor
    • the applicable Subject Benchmark Statement
    • the requirements of any professional, regulatory, statutory and accrediting bodies.

    Attendance and Independent Study

    As part of your course induction, you will be provided with details of the organisation and management of the course, including attendance and assessment requirements - usually in the form of a timetable. For full-time courses, the precise timetable for each semester is not confirmed until close to the start date and may be subject to some change in the early weeks as all courses settle into their planned patterns. For part-time courses which require attendance on particular days and times, an expectation of the days and periods of attendance will be included in the letter of offer. A course handbook is also made available.

    Courses comprise modules for which the notional effort involved is indicated by its credit rating. Each credit point represents 10 hours of student effort. Undergraduate courses typically contain 10- or 20-credit modules (more usually 20) and postgraduate course typically 15- or 30-credit modules.

    The normal study load expectation for an undergraduate full-time course of study in the standard academic year is 120 credit points. This amounts to around 36-42 hours of expected teaching and learning per week, inclusive of attendance requirements for lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical work, fieldwork or other scheduled classes, private study, and assessment. Part-time study load is the same as full-time pro-rata, with each credit point representing 10 hours of student effort.

    Postgraduate Master’s courses typically comprise 180 credits, taken in three semesters when studied full-time. A Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) comprises 60 credits and can usually be completed on a part-time basis in one year. A 120-credit Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) can usually be completed on a part-time basis in two years.

    Class contact times vary by course and type of module. Typically, for a module predominantly delivered through lectures you can expect at least 3 contact hours per week (lectures/seminars/tutorials). Laboratory classes often require a greater intensity of attendance in blocks. Some modules may combine lecture and laboratory. The precise model will depend on the course you apply for and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. Prospective students will be consulted about any significant changes.

    Assessment

    Assessment methods vary and are defined explicitly in each module. Assessment can be a combination of examination and coursework but may also be only one of these methods. Assessment is designed to assess your achievement of the module’s stated learning outcomes. You can expect to receive timely feedback on all coursework assessment. The precise assessment will depend on the module and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

    Coursework can take many forms, for example: essay, report, seminar paper, test, presentation, dissertation, design, artefacts, portfolio, journal, group work. The precise form and combination of assessment will depend on the course you apply for and the module. Details will be made available in advance through induction, the course handbook, the module specification and the assessment timetable. The details are subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

    Normally, a module will have 4 learning outcomes, and no more than 2 items of assessment. An item of assessment can comprise more than one task. The notional workload and the equivalence across types of assessment is standardised.

    Calculation of the Final Award

    The class of Honours awarded in Bachelor’s degrees is usually determined by calculation of an aggregate mark based on performance across the modules at Levels 5 and 6, (which correspond to the second and third year of full-time attendance).

    Level 6 modules contribute 70% of the aggregate mark and Level 5 contributes 30% to the calculation of the class of the award. Classification of integrated Master’s degrees with Honours include a Level 7 component. The calculation in this case is: 50% Level 7, 30% Level 6, 20% Level 5. At least half the Level 5 modules must be studied at the University for Level 5 to be included in the calculation of the class.

    All other qualifications have an overall grade determined by results in modules from the final level of study. In Master’s degrees of more than 200 credit points the final 120 points usually determine the overall grading.

Academic profile

The University employs over 1,000 suitably qualified and experienced academic staff - 59% have PhDs in their subject field and many have professional body recognition.

Courses are taught by staff who are Professors (25%), Readers, Senior Lecturers (18%) or Lecturers (57%).

We require most academic staff to be qualified to teach in higher education: 82% hold either Postgraduate Certificates in Higher Education Practice or higher. Most academic staff (81%) are accredited fellows of the Higher Education Academy (HEA) - the university sector professional body for teaching and learning. Many academic and technical staff hold other professional body designations related to their subject or scholarly practice.

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    The profiles of many academic staff can be found on the University’s departmental websites and give a detailed insight into the range of staffing and expertise. The precise staffing for a course will depend on the department(s) involved and the availability and management of staff. This is subject to change annually and is confirmed in the timetable issued at the start of the course.

    Occasionally, teaching may be supplemented by suitably qualified part-time staff (usually qualified researchers) and specialist guest lecturers. In these cases, all staff are inducted, mostly through our staff development programme ‘First Steps to Teaching’. In some cases, usually for provision in one of our out-centres, Recognised University Teachers are involved, supported by the University in suitable professional development for teaching.

    Figures correct for academic year 2019-2020.

Modules

Here is a guide to the subjects studied on this course.

Courses are continually reviewed to take advantage of new teaching approaches and developments in research, industry and the professions. Please be aware that modules may change for your year of entry. The exact modules available and their order may vary depending on course updates, staff availability, timetabling and student demand. Please contact the course team for the most up to date module list.

Year one

Contemporary Tourism

Year: 1

This module provides students with an overview of trends and challenges that currently affect the tourism industry. Tourist motivation, customer profiles, activities, attractions, economic, technological and political factors, and their impacts on domestic and international travel are discussed. Students are made aware that tourism has continued to develop and evolve through time, and many current trends will wane as new ones emerge.

Global Travel Destinations

Year: 1

This module explores the major tourist destinations of the world, and examines principal geographic features and concepts relating to aspects such as tourist motivation and destination success. It also introduces the student to the travel trade sector of the industry and its core functions, together with key legal aspects.

Food Tourism, Festivals and Events

Year: 1

This module provides students with an overview of the diverse range of food tours, festivals and events that destinations can harness to diversify their tourism product offering and, therefore, increase their competitiveness. Food is a key part of all cultures, a major element of global intangible heritage and an increasingly important attraction for tourists. So therefore, it is important that students are aware of how food festivals, wine and other beverages tasting trails, cooking experiences and competitions, open farms, factories and food markets can contribute to enhance the tourist experience.

Media, Creativity & Experience

Year: 1

The module explores the importance of media to business success in the various sectors of the tourism, events and food industries. It develops student skills and understanding in relation to writing and creating content for a variety of media applications as well as providing introductory support in relation to writing and research for their degree studies. As such the module will foster digital creativity in a variety of contexts and situations applicable to the student's course and their respective industries.

Management in Action

Year: 1

This module examines the principals of management and applies these to the practice of organisational management. It is an introductory module, which will help the student become familiar with the nature and scope of management. It examines the development of management theories and the impact of the external and internal environments on effective and professional management. The student will explore how to manage others and how to improve productivity for future business success.

Introduction to Leisure and Tourism

Year: 1

This introductory module introduces students to the key concepts involved in the study of leisure and tourism, including definition, historical development, supply and demand, impacts, current and future challenges facing leisure and tourism.

Year two

People Management

Year: 2

Managing People is an important part of all managers' jobs whether they are Line Managers or Human Resource (HR) specialists. Successful management and leadership can make a significant difference to the performance of teams and individuals and to the achievement of organisational objectives. This module is designed to provide students with an introduction to people management strategies which can help achieve high performance within the service industry.

Accounting Studies

Year: 2

This module focuses on managerial decision making for both SMEs and larger corporations in the tourism and hospitality sectors. The content includes costing, budgeting, investment appraisal and working capital management. The student will be expected to apply knowledge to the decision-making process and discuss alternatives relevant to the range of service industries studied by students within the Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management.

Business Research Methods

Year: 2

The module will develop and enhance the student's ability to carry out appropriate research, process data and utilise effectively the latest ICT packages and applications relevant to their course and their chosen business field.

Transportation Operations in Tourism

Year: 2

The module provides the student with a comprehensive introduction to land, sea and air transportation issues and explains the role the different modes of transport play in relation to tourism. The module is also designed to equip students with the appropriate skills associated with key supervisory functions in travel companies to ensure vocational understanding relevant for potential employment.

Landscape Change and Tourism

Year: 2

This module reviews the impacts of tourism as found across a range of tourism settings, addressing economic, social/cultural and environmental impacts. The module looks in-depth at the relationship between tourism and landscape.

Contemporary Marketing Practice

Year: 2

This module introduces and explores key areas of marketing theory and their application to the contemporary business organisation. The module defines marketing and examines the development of the marketing concept, the marketing environment and key aspects of contemporary marketing theory and practice including segmentation, consumer behaviour, marketing research, the marketing mix and through assessment provides students with the opportunity to actually apply these concepts to contemporary industry situations.

Year three

Placement

Year: 3

This module is optional

This module provides undergraduate students with an opportunity to gain structured and professional work experience, in a work-based learning environment, as part of their planned programme of study. This experience allows students to develop, refine and reflect on their key personal and professional skills. The placement should significantly support the development of the student's employability skills, preparation for final year and enhance their employability journey.

International Academic Studies - Study Abroad

Year: 3

This module is optional

This module provides an opportunity to undertake an extended period of study outside the UK and Republic of Ireland. Students will develop an enhanced understanding of the academic discipline whilst generating educational and cultural networks.

Year four

Tourism Planning, Development and Management

Year: 4

This module provides students with an advanced understanding of tourism planning, development and management. It provides students in their final year of their degree with an appreciation of the difficulties associated with planning, developing and managing tourism at varying scales and for certain niche products and markets, all often in the face of externalities that the tourism industry has limited control over.

eBusiness Strategy

Year: 4

The module explores the current importance and future potential of the internet and digital media to business success in the various sectors of travel/tourism and leisure/events management. It deals with planning, development and marketing of such enterprises in today's evolving electronic marketplace and seeks to develop student skills with regard to digital creativity and innovation from a strategic perspective to aid in future employability.

Creating Visitor Experiences

Year: 4

This module investigates theory and current practice in the creation and management of visitor experiences within the event, leisure and tourism industry. The scope and nature of 'experiences' - live events and activities - are explored. There is an emphasis on how leisure and tourism experiences can be actively managed. The professional skills of creativity, innovation and communication are engaged in practical, problem-solving activities including preparing a professional proposal for a customer experience.

Contemporary Issues in Leisure, Tourism and Events

Year: 4

This module provides students with an opportunity to research, discuss and analyse current issues in leisure, tourism and events. Lectures and seminars provide an overview of key issues but the module also has a research emphasis and students are expected to research a current issue. Although students are not allowed to use the same title this module does provide a foundation for the research paper which is an optional module in the second semester.

The Business Plan

Year: 4

This module is optional

In this module students are engaged in practical entrepreneurship and will develop their knowledge of entrepreneurship and the entrepreneurial process. This will be evidenced through the development of a business plan for new venture creation, enterprise development, project management or a community based development project.

Managing Talent and Productivity

Year: 4

This module is optional

The contemporary workplace is changing and there has probably never been a more challenging time to be in Human Resources (HR) or be responsible for managing people. Human Resource teams and Line Managers have a major role to play in driving performance and achieving competitive advantage. This module provides an opportunity for students to acquire the necessary knowledge and skills needed to help attract, manage and retain the best talent nationally and internationally.

Research Paper

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module will assess the student's ability to carry out appropriate academic research, process data and utilize effectively the latest IT applications to provide an independent researched piece of work relevant to their course and their chosen industry.

Management Accounting

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module focuses on managerial decision making for both SMEs and larger corporations in the tourism and hospitality sectors. The content includes costing, budgeting, investment appraisal and working capital management. The student will be expected to apply knowledge to the decision-making process and discuss alternatives relevant to the range of service industries studied by students within the Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management.

Contemporary Marketing Management

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module examines and expands on the principle concepts and theories of marketing and their practical application to contemporary marketing management. It is a module that builds on the Contemporary Marketing Practice module at level 5. Issues include the management of the marketing concept, marketing environments, planning, research application and techniques, segmentation, the marketing mix, e-marketing and digital marketing within specific businesses at a local, national and international level as they apply to the marketing management function.

Entry conditions

We recognise a range of qualifications for admission to our courses. In addition to the specific entry conditions for this course you must also meet the University’s General Entrance Requirements.

A level

Grades BCC - BBB.

Applicants may be able to satisfy the requirement for one A-Level B or C grade by substituting a combination of alternative qualifications to the same standard as defined by UCAS.

Applied General Qualifications

QCF Pearson BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma

Award profile of DDM to DDD

RQF Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma

Award profile of DMM to DDM

QCF Pearson BTEC Level 3 Diploma

Award profile of DD plus A Level Grade B

RQF Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Diploma

Award profile of DM plus A Level Grade B

QCF Pearson BTEC Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma

Award profile of D plus A Level Grades BB

RQF Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate

Award profile of D (to include subject requirements) plus A Level Grades BB

Irish Leaving Certificate

Overall Irish Leaving Certificate profile H3, H3, H3, H4, H4 – H3, H3, H3, H3, H3.

Scottish Highers

Grades BCCCC – BBBCC.

Scottish Advanced Highers

Grades CDD - CCC.

International Baccalaureate

Overall profile is minimum 24 - 26 points (12 - 13 at higher level).

Access to Higher Education (HE)

Overall profile 60% - 65% (120 credit Access Course) (NI Access Course)

Overall profile of 24 credits at distinctions; 21 credits at merit (60 credit Access Course) (GB Access Course)

GCSE

For full-time study, you must satisfy the General Entrance Requirements for admission to a first degree course and hold a GCSE pass at Grade C/4 in English Language and Mathematics

Essential Skills Level 2 Application of Number will be accepted as equivalent to GCSE Maths.

Essential Skills Level 2 Communication will be accepted as equivalent to GCSE English.

English Language Requirements

English language requirements for international applicants
The minimum requirement for this course is Academic IELTS 6.0 with no band score less than 5.5.

Trinity ISE: Pass at level III also meets this requirement for Tier 4 visa purposes.

Ulster recognises a number of other English language tests and comparable IELTS equivalent scores.

Additional Entry Requirements

Acceptable alternative qualifications include:

Pass HND with overall Merit to include 30 to 60 distinctions in level 5 credits

Pass HNC with overall Merit to include 60 to 90 distinctions in level 4 credits

You may also meet the course entry requirements with combinations of different qualifications to the same standard as recognised by the University (provided subject requirements as noted above are met).

Exemptions and transferability

If you have already obtained the required grade in the relevant Foundation Degree you can opt to complete bridging modules prior to progressing onto the final year of the course. Other qualifications may be considered for exemptions and/or advanced entry based on your prior certificated learning or prior experiential learning.

Careers & opportunities

Graduate employers

Graduates from this course are now working for:

  • Aer Lingus
  • Disney
  • Emirates
  • Loch Lomond Golf Resort
  • Tourism Ireland
  • Tourism NI
  • Visit Britain

Job roles

With this degree you could become:

  • Airline Manager
  • Airport Operations
  • Digital Marketing Manager (Tourism)
  • Events Manager
  • Hotel Manager
  • Tourism Marketing Manager
  • Visitor Attraction Manager

Career options

This qualification offers a range of management career opportunities in one of the world’s largest and fastest growing sectors. The travel and tourism industry is composed of a diverse range of sectors and employers including national tourist organisations, airlines, visitor attractions (theme/amusement parks, natural landscape sites, castles, museums), tour operators, event venues, ferry/cruise companies, airport operations and management. You also have the opportunity to pursue avenues such as teaching, lecturing, training, research and consultancy in relation to tourism.

Alternatively you have the option after completion to progress on to postgraduate study on programmes such as the MSc International Event Management, MSc International Tourism Management and MSc International Hospitality Management.

Work placement / study abroad

During year three of the course, you will complete a compulsory work placement or study aboard. This may be a 48 week work placement with a range of national and international companies. Opportunities include internationally based companies such as CIE Tours, Walt Disney World (Florida, USA) and Aer Lingus (Newark, Boston & Los Angeles) as well as UK and Ireland based examples with local district councils, tourism authorities and the visitor attractions sector. The satisfactory completion of placement leads to the award of Diploma in Professional Practice/ Diploma in Professional Practice (International) upon graduation.

Alternatively, you can opt to complete a period of study abroad. During this period, you spend two semesters in an educational institution, which will provide exposure to alternative business cultures and protocols and enhance your personal and professional development. Successful completion of the placement leads to the award of the Diploma in International Academic Studies (DIAS) upon graduation.

Professional recognition

Institute of Hospitality (IoH)

Accredited by the Institute of Hospitality that academic, vocational and professional standards achieved are appropriate and programme content and delivery meet international Institute of Hospitality benchmark standards.

Apply

Applications to full-time undergraduate degrees at Ulster are made through UCAS.

Start dates

  • September 2021

Fees and funding

Scholarships, awards and prizes

Origin Digital Award - best digital business plan and concept in the eBusiness Strategy module.

Bank of Ireland Digital Innovation Award for the best industry pitch in the eBusiness Strategy module.

Hospitality Review NI Media Award for the best student article in the Media, Creativity & Experience module.

The Taste.ie Food Tourism & Creativity Award in the Food Tourism, Festivals & Events module.

Additional mandatory costs

Tuition fees and costs associated with accommodation, travel (including car parking charges), and normal living are a part of university life.

Where a course has additional mandatory expenses we make every effort to highlight them. These may include residential visits, field trips, materials (e.g. art, design, engineering) inoculations, security checks, computer equipment, uniforms, professional memberships etc.

We aim to provide students with the learning materials needed to support their studies. Our libraries are a valuable resource with an extensive collection of books and journals as well as first-class facilities and IT equipment. Computer suites and free wifi is also available on each of the campuses.

There will be some additional costs to being a student which cannot be itemised and these will be different for each student. You may choose to purchase your own textbooks and course materials or prefer your own computer and software. Printing and binding may also be required. There are additional fees for graduation ceremonies, examination resits and library fines. Additional costs vary from course to course.

Students choosing a period of paid work placement or study abroad as part of their course should be aware that there may be additional travel and living costs as well as tuition fees.

Please contact the course team for more information.

Contact

Course Director: Dr Peter Bolan

T: +44 (0)28 7012 3957

E: ps.bolan@ulster.ac.uk

Joanne Warke - Admissions Office

T: +44 (0)28 7012 3259

E: j.warke@ulster.ac.uk

International Admissions Office

E: internationaladmissions@ulster.ac.uk

For more information visit

Ulster University Business School

Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management

Disclaimer

  1. The University endeavours to deliver courses and programmes of study in accordance with the description set out in this prospectus. The University’s prospectus is produced at the earliest possible date in order to provide maximum assistance to individuals considering applying for a course of study offered by the University. The University makes every effort to ensure that the information contained in the prospectus is accurate but it is possible that some changes will occur between the date of printing and the start of the academic year to which it relates. Please note that the University’s website is the most up-to-date source of information regarding courses and facilities and we strongly recommend that you always visit the website before making any commitments.
  2. Although reasonable steps are taken to provide the programmes and services described, the University cannot guarantee the provision of any course or facility and the University may make variations to the contents or methods of delivery of courses, discontinue, merge or combine courses and introduce new courses if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Such circumstances include (but are not limited to) industrial action, lack of demand, departure of key staff, changes in legislation or government policy including changes, if any, resulting from the UK departing the European Union, withdrawal or reduction of funding or other circumstances beyond the University’s reasonable control.
  3. If the University discontinues any courses, it will use its best endeavours to provide a suitable alternative course. In addition, courses may change during the course of study and in such circumstances the University will normally undertake a consultation process prior to any such changes being introduced and seek to ensure that no student is unreasonably prejudiced as a consequence of any such change.
  4. The University does not accept responsibility (other than through the negligence of the University, its staff or agents), for the consequences of any modification or cancellation of any course, or part of a course, offered by the University but will take into consideration the effects on individual students and seek to minimise the impact of such effects where reasonably practicable.
  5. The University cannot accept any liability for disruption to its provision of educational or other services caused by circumstances beyond its control, but the University will take all reasonable steps to minimise the resultant disruption to such services.

Testimonials

'I thoroughly enjoyed the International Travel & Tourism Management course at Ulster University. From vaulable analysis of international market trends to highly relevant work placement opportunities to a particularly insightful eBusiness consulting module, this course set the platform for me to achieve great sucess in this hugely important global industry'

Rosie Henderson - Market Manager: UK & Ireland at Expedia Group

‘The International Travel and Tourism Management course very much developed my interest in travel and in the airline industry in particular. It is thanks to such a course that I have achieved success in the industry and the sector that I first studied about on the programme’.

Aislinn McAlister – General Manager at United Airlines BFS.

‘Studying the International Travel and Tourism programme between 2001 and 2005 was one of the best decisions I have made. The course inspired me from the outset and provided a truly interesting blend of appropriate subjects and motivated me to succeed both in my academic studies and in the workplace’.

Isabelle Ramsden - Head of Department / Lecturer at Girne American University.

‘The International Travel and Tourism Management degree was extremely enjoyable and informative. It really helped me develop the knowledge and skills required to succeed in an industry that I am so passionate about’.

Claire Anderson - Sales and Marketing Manager at Manor House Country Hotel, Enniskillen (formerly with Tourism Ireland).

'The industry needs graduates who have the right knowledge and expertise about tourism in today's marketplace. The international travel and tourism course at Ulster very much provides that'.

Aubrey Irwin - Head of Northern Ireland at Tourism Ireland.

  Course Content