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Screen Production
BA (Hons)

2020/21 Full-time Undergraduate course

Award:

Bachelor of Arts with Honours

Faculty:

Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

School:

School of Communication and Media

Campus:

Belfast campus

UCAS code:

P594
The UCAS code for Ulster University is U20

Overview

What to work in the film, television or creative industries? Then this is the highly practical, industry facing degree choice for you.

Summary

The BA (Hons) in Screen Production is an intensely practical, industry facing degree, designed for those who want to work in the film, television or creative industries. You will study specialist skills modules in cinematography, editing, screenwriting, sound production, live TV and documentary to name a few.

Screen Production combines the craft skills needed for fiction, documentary and live television production with the kind of research, theoretical and critical skills, employers tell us are essential for new entrants going into the creative industries. The BA (Hons) in Screen Production is taught in a brand new studio complex in Belfast's city centre. The huge array of industry-standard equipment available to you will enable you to finish your work to festival or broadcast standard. You will be taught by academics and industry professionals with years of experience in screen production, to give you the skills and confidence you need to succeed in your future career. Many of the staff, including the technical staff, have a vast array of film and broadcast credits on award-winning content gained over the past 20 years.

Your creative work will be supported by learning about the ideas and histories that underscore the forms and genres that make up the world of contemporary film and television. The aim of this is to encourage you to be bold in your thinking and imaginative in your work.

Ulster University is one of the longest standing and most respected of providers of education in film, television and related media, supported by pioneering research and creative practice.


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Belfast campus

A globally recognised hub of creativity, innovation and entrepreneurship

About this course

About

The BA (Hons) in Screen Production is delivered in a brand new studio complex in heart of Belfast's city centre. It is part of the Ulster Screen Academy, bringing together courses in film, television, interactive design and media, animation and gaming design. It is located in an exciting and dynamic part of the city known as the 'Cathedral Quarter'. Nearby, are many of the biggest production companies in Northern Ireland and the campus is only a short distance from the famous 'Paint Hall' studios where Games of Thrones was filmed.

The BA (Hons) in Screen Production will introduce you to the widest possible experience of film and television production, combined with critical thinking to help you originate new content and unlock your creativity. We can help you develop the craft skills you will need to enter the industry and 70% of your class time will be spent in production modules.

The degree can be taken over 3-4 years. 4 years, if you decide to take year three out to work in the industry on placement. During the placement year, you can also earn a Diploma in Professional Practice.

You will receive significant software training in non-linear editing using the Adobe Creative Suite for both sound and video. We have a dedicated screening room, large Apple Mac labs offering a range of industry-standard software on campus. Our studio space is fully equipped with green screens, lighting desk and live broadcast facilities. We have a full range of 4k Blackmagic cinema cameras and can edit and colour grade video footage in our dedicated editing suites.

Screens surround us in our everyday life, whether they are mobile or sitting in the corner of a room. We want you to be prepared to join a fast-growing, exciting and ever-changing industry that creates great stories and new content for all of the screens in our lives, big or small. Through practice-based learning, you will acquire advanced knowledge of the kind of skills needed for digital film and television production combined with a knowledge of how the industry works, and the writing skills to tell the stories you want to make your way.

The screen-based sector is one of the fastest-growing sectors of the Northern Ireland economy. This programme has been developed with industry partners to ensure that it addresses current and future skills gaps in the sector helping to create entrepreneurial and creative graduates who can not only address current skills gaps but also develop new businesses to grow the local creative economy.

Year One – Much of your time in the first year will be spent learning the craft skills you need in order to create high-quality film and television outputs. You will study Camera Craft and Composition, The Art and Craft of Editing to develop technical and production skills for the screen, Sound on Screen and Screenwriting to develop your storytelling and audio skills for TV and film production. These are combined with two core modules in the critical and theoretical aspects of screen production. Screen Stories and Screen Cultures.You will be introduced to the core of TV production; compelling stories. You will also gain an understanding of how media affects the world around us and how culture and politics are reflected in the media we produce and consume.

Year Two – Building on your technical and storytelling skills from year one you will focus on a number of core genres; Drama, Documentary and Live Television. Working in teams to develop a wide range of outputs and experience a range of industry roles, you will get the opportunity to better understand and focus your career pathways. Alongside the production modules, you will study Screen Audiencesto help deepen your knowledge and understanding of audiences and media publics. Additionally Screen Industries and a short industry placement will help you to focus on your career planning and gain a better understanding of the film and television industries.

On completion of year two, you can opt to take a sandwich year, either undertaking a year placement in industry or studying in one of our partner institutions in America, Europe, or Asia. The placement year or study abroad (see Careers and Opportunities for more information) means that students gain an additional qualification, a Diploma in Professional Practice (DPP) and the International Year means that students gain a Diploma in International Academic Studies (DIAS).

Year Three/(Four after a year out) – In the final year of study, you will work with internationally recognised researchers and fellow students in other courses under the Ulster Screen Academy to develop an innovative Major Project. Leading a team to develop a major portfolio piece, you and your fellow students will take on technical roles in a range of productions from Short Film, Live Television and Documentary. This will allow you to graduate with a large portfolio of work, in a range of industry roles helping to demonstrate your skills and knowledge in media production – making you as employable as possible.

Associate awards

Diploma in Professional Practice DPP

Diploma in International Academic Studies DIAS

Find out more about placement awards

Attendance

This course must be completed as a full-time degree over three years or four years should you opt to take a placement or international study year.

In line with the University’s attendance policy, attendance at all taught sessions is compulsory. It is expected that you will engage not only with the taught elements but also with independent learning.

Start dates

  • September 2020

Teaching, Learning and Assessment

Students are assessed through a wide variety of creative production outputs, written essays and presentations. There are currently no written exams in Screen Production. Students will be taught 3 modules per semester. There are two semesters in each academic year. Therefore you will be taught the equivalent of 6 modules per year for three years. The assessment is designed to give you excellent opportunities to develop a large portfolio of creative film and television work that you can share with potential employers. 70% of the course is production-based.

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    Content

    The content for each course is summarised on the relevant course page, along with an overview of the modules that make up the course.

    Each course is approved by the University and meets the expectations of:

    • the relevant generic national Qualification Descriptor
    • the applicable Subject Benchmark Statement
    • the requirements of any professional, regulatory, statutory and accrediting bodies.

    Attendance and Independent Study

    As part of your course induction, you will be provided with details of the organisation and management of the course, including attendance and assessment requirements - usually in the form of a timetable. For full-time courses, the precise timetable for each semester is not confirmed until close to the start date and may be subject to some change in the early weeks as all courses settle into their planned patterns. For part-time courses which require attendance on particular days and times, an expectation of the days and periods of attendance will be included in the letter of offer. A course handbook is also made available.

    Courses comprise modules for which the notional effort involved is indicated by its credit rating. Each credit point represents 10 hours of student effort. Undergraduate courses typically contain 10- or 20-credit modules (more usually 20) and postgraduate course typically 15- or 30-credit modules.

    The normal study load expectation for an undergraduate full-time course of study in the standard academic year is 120 credit points. This amounts to around 36-42 hours of expected teaching and learning per week, inclusive of attendance requirements for lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical work, fieldwork or other scheduled classes, private study, and assessment. Part-time study load is the same as full-time pro-rata, with each credit point representing 10 hours of student effort.

    Postgraduate Master’s courses typically comprise 180 credits, taken in three semesters when studied full-time. A Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) comprises 60 credits and can usually be completed on a part-time basis in one year. A 120-credit Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) can usually be completed on a part-time basis in two years.

    Class contact times vary by course and type of module. Typically, for a module predominantly delivered through lectures you can expect at least 3 contact hours per week (lectures/seminars/tutorials). Laboratory classes often require a greater intensity of attendance in blocks. Some modules may combine lecture and laboratory. The precise model will depend on the course you apply for and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. Prospective students will be consulted about any significant changes.

    Assessment

    Assessment methods vary and are defined explicitly in each module. Assessment can be a combination of examination and coursework but may also be only one of these methods. Assessment is designed to assess your achievement of the module’s stated learning outcomes. You can expect to receive timely feedback on all coursework assessment. The precise assessment will depend on the module and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

    Coursework can take many forms, for example: essay, report, seminar paper, test, presentation, dissertation, design, artefacts, portfolio, journal, group work. The precise form and combination of assessment will depend on the course you apply for and the module. Details will be made available in advance through induction, the course handbook, the module specification and the assessment timetable. The details are subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

    Normally, a module will have 4 learning outcomes, and no more than 2 items of assessment. An item of assessment can comprise more than one task. The notional workload and the equivalence across types of assessment is standardised.

    Calculation of the Final Award

    The class of Honours awarded in Bachelor’s degrees is usually determined by calculation of an aggregate mark based on performance across the modules at Levels 5 and 6, (which correspond to the second and third year of full-time attendance).

    Level 6 modules contribute 70% of the aggregate mark and Level 5 contributes 30% to the calculation of the class of the award. Classification of integrated Master’s degrees with Honours include a Level 7 component. The calculation in this case is: 50% Level 7, 30% Level 6, 20% Level 5. At least half the Level 5 modules must be studied at the University for Level 5 to be included in the calculation of the class.

    All other qualifications have an overall grade determined by results in modules from the final level of study. In Master’s degrees of more than 200 credit points the final 120 points usually determine the overall grading.

Academic profile

The Course Director for Screen Production is:

Dr Declan Keeney, BMus(Hons), LTCL, PgDip, PGCHET, FHEA, MA, PHD.

Declan is an award-winning academic, documentary filmmaker and Director of Photography, who has worked in the creative industries for nearly 25 years. Declan gained unique experience working on the front-line of broadcast journalism, factual programme-making and outside broadcasts during his 13 years on staff at the BBC. He currently chairs the judging panel for the Royal Television Society Northern Ireland’s, News and Current Affairs awards.

Declan has extensive experience of working on large-scale grant-aided projects. Three of his most recent documentary films working with victims and survivors of the Troubles received funding from PEACE III, managed by the Special EU Programme’s Body. His documentary We Carried Your Secrets was profiled at the European Parliament in 2014, as best practice in peace and reconciliation work in Europe. Declan is currently an artist in residence with the Playhouse’s Peace Building Academy and funded through PEACE IV to create an augmented reality documentary. The film entitled ‘Frictionless’ explores what a hard border in Ireland means to those who lived through the conflict here.

Declan is also a co-investigator on a research project entitled Future Screens NI which represents a £13 million investment in Creative Industries research in Northern Ireland with partners QUB, Ulster University, BBC NI, RTE and Northern Ireland Screen.

The University employs over 1,000 suitably qualified and experienced academic staff - 59% have PhDs in their subject field and many have professional body recognition.

Courses are taught by staff who are Professors (25%), Readers, Senior Lecturers (18%) or Lecturers (57%).

We require most academic staff to be qualified to teach in higher education: 82% hold either Postgraduate Certificates in Higher Education Practice or higher. Most academic staff (81%) are accredited fellows of the Higher Education Academy (HEA) - the university sector professional body for teaching and learning. Many academic and technical staff hold other professional body designations related to their subject or scholarly practice.

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    The profiles of many academic staff can be found on the University’s departmental websites and give a detailed insight into the range of staffing and expertise. The precise staffing for a course will depend on the department(s) involved and the availability and management of staff. This is subject to change annually and is confirmed in the timetable issued at the start of the course.

    Occasionally, teaching may be supplemented by suitably qualified part-time staff (usually qualified researchers) and specialist guest lecturers. In these cases, all staff are inducted, mostly through our staff development programme ‘First Steps to Teaching’. In some cases, usually for provision in one of our out-centres, Recognised University Teachers are involved, supported by the University in suitable professional development for teaching.

    Figures correct for academic year 2019-2020.

Modules

Here is a guide to the subjects studied on this course.

Courses are continually reviewed to take advantage of new teaching approaches and developments in research, industry and the professions. Please be aware that modules may change for your year of entry. The exact modules available and their order may vary depending on course updates, staff availability, timetabling and student demand. Please contact the course team for the most up to date module list.

Year one

Screen Stories

Year: 1

This module explores the historical and contemporary approaches to understanding and analysing narrative focusing specifically on screen-based media. The module tracks a range of themes such as poetics, authorship, discourse, textuality and form as they progress from early narratology, through formalism, structuralism, post-structuralism, postmodern narratology and into contemporary debates and aesthetics drawing on interactivity, immersion and narrative agency.

Screen Foundation Practice: Camera Craft and Composition

Year: 1

The module is an introduction to the essential skills of video production and the moving image. It allows students to acquire skills in video production, sound, lighting and the moving image and develop a portfolio of short films which showcase their technical skills and competencies.

Screen Foundation Practice: Sound and Vision

Year: 1

This module considers core concepts in sound for screen and the association of sound and vision. The module will introduce students to the history and theory of sound and screen; and a range of technical and aesthetic considerations in producing sound for screen media. Students will be introduced to sound capture and software manipulation. This will be delivered in the context of a lecture series that considers the history and critical and formalist theory of sound and screen, the development of the film score and music soundtracks.

Screen Foundation Practice: Screenwriting

Year: 1

Screenwriting is as essential to the development and production of on-screen drama as storytelling is to being human. Complimenting the student's understanding and knowledge acquired during Storytelling for Screen, this module introduces students to the process of screenwriting; its key skills; and a range of technical, aesthetic considerations in developing a script for screen. It presents this writing practice in context of an understanding of the history and theory of screenwriting, and allows students top demonstrate their knowledge in this field.

Screen Cultures

Year: 1

Screen Cultures introduces students to the historical and contemporary debates pertaining to screen cultures. It seeks to develop students' critical literacy regarding images and their social production. In this respect, the module underpins the screen production elements and helps students to understand the social formation of screen forms, and the theoretical and critical debates relevant to them. Students will look at semiotic, psychoanalytic and political economic approaches to understanding what appears on screen; they will look also at questions of identity, ideology, power and pleasure as these pertain to screen cultures.

Screen Foundation Practice: Art and Craft of Editing

Year: 1

This module introduces students to the theory and practice of visual editing. Students will be introduced to key concepts relating visual editing practice such as meaning-making and narrative construction. These will be related to key movements in editing practice such as continuity editing, montage editing and postmodern editing. Students will develop their editing skills through hands-on editing workshops using Adobe Premiere CC and the production of an editing practice portfolio.

Year two

Screen Industries

Year: 2

This module introduces students to a range of job roles from across the media and creative industries to help them plan and apply for a short placement. The module helps students develop their understanding of defined job roles and build a range of resources to help them interface with the media industry more professionally.

This module engages students in a 2 week (or 70 hour) work placement, or work based learning opportunity in the Media and Creative Industries. The module uses work-based learning and reflective practitioner models to help student develop their professional skills and understanding or the media industry.

Short form content: Documentary

Year: 2

This module introduces students to key concepts in relation to the history, theory and practice of the documentary genre. It will cover key movements in the genre such as cinéma vérité and direct cinema, alongside contemporary sub-genres such as reality television and the mock-documentary. The module encourages students to consider how the platform affects the content e.g. short-form broadcast content and long-form content on streaming services such as Netflix. Students will apply this knowledge to their own documentary practice by producing 3x2min short-form documentaries that demonstrate understanding of the codes and conventions of particular forms e.g. expository, participatory and poetic.

Screen Audiences

Year: 2

Screen Audiences introduces students to the historical and contemporary debates about audiences, publics and citizens as these pertain to screen studies. The module seeks to develop students' sociological and cultural understanding of audiences. The modules introduces students to the historical and contemporary debates about audiences, publics and citizens as these pertain to screen studies. The module seeks to develop students' sociological and cultural understanding of audiences.

Short form content: Drama

Year: 2

In Short Form Content - Drama, students will produce a series of screen dramas, that draws upon a formalist understanding of television genres and styles, the critical debates that have arisen regarding them, and their historical development. The module introduces students a variety of television drama genres and styles; crime, soaps, comedy, documentary drama, realism, modernism and postmodernism. It invites them to produce a series of short dramas for screen that observe generic codes and conventions.

Year three

Industrial Placement: Media

Year: 3

This module is optional

This module provides students the opportunity to experience life as a professional media practitioner. They will be expected to conduct themselves professionally being an employee of a company and an ambassador for the University during this period. They will be supported by an academic coordinator.

Media: Study Abroad (DIAS)

Year: 3

This module is optional

This module provides an opportunity to undertake an additional academic year of study which is spent outside the UK. Those who successfully complete it get an extra qualification - the Diploma in Academic Studies (DIAS). Students will develop an enhanced understanding of the media and engage with it first-hand in international contexts. The opportunity to generate educational and cultural networks will be available to the student.

Year four

Transmedia Storytelling

Year: 4

This module draws on a range of disciplines and media forms to deliver a transmedial participatory narrative which is delivered across a number of platforms. Students are asked to consider new approaches to story and how audience responses to narrative can be evaluated and analysed. The module engages with new forms of story and new shapes of narrative delivery where audiences become active and help to shape the story as it unfolds.

Preparation for Major Project

Year: 4

This module will act as the culmination of the students' theoretical study across the 3 years of their degree where they are able to independently plan and research a major project in the key practice areas of drama or documentary. Students will produce a portfolio that evidences the theoretical and professional pre-production planning and processes that underpin their Major Project. Students will also produce a 3000-4000 word textual analysis of existing media texts.

Major Project

Year: 4

In this module students will create a final year screen production project under the guidance of an appointed member of Media Studies staff in the key practice areas of drama or documentary. Students will identify and analyse the theoretical and ideological underpinnings of their media practice by writing a 3000-4000 word textual analysis of their major project.

Entry conditions

We recognise a range of qualifications for admission to our courses. In addition to the specific entry conditions for this course you must also meet the University’s General Entrance Requirements.

A level

A level

The A Level requirement for this course is BBB - BBC at A2.

Applicants may satisfy the requirement for the A level C grade by substituting a combination of alternative qualifications to the same standard as defined by the University.

Applied General Qualifications

BTEC National Extended Diploma

Overall BTEC National Extended Diploma profile requires a minimum of:

DDM-DMM award profile to include a minimum of 9-8 distinctions in level 3 units.

BTEC National Diploma

The National Diploma may be accepted in combination with other qualifications. Where an applicant offers a profile of Diploma and an A level then the Diploma should be achieved at the upper end of the standard A level offer profile (i.e. if one A level is offered with a Diploma and our standard A level offer is BBC then we normally ask for a BB equivalent at Diploma and the A level at grade C, see further below).

BB = Distinction, Merit (To include 6 distinctions)

BC = Distinction, Merit (To include 5 distinctions)

BTEC SUBSIDIARY DIPLOMA/NATIONAL EXTENDED CERTIFICATE

The Subsidiary Diploma/National Extended Certificate may be accepted in combination with A levels. Where A levels are offered as part of a profile then they should be achieved at the upper end of the standard A level offer profile (i.e. if two A levels are offered with a Subsidiary Diploma and our standard A level offer is BBC then we normally ask for BB at A level with the Subsidiary Diploma offer at the appropriate differential to satisfy the A level grade profile (grade C) - see further below).

A* grade = Distinction (To include 5 distinctions in level 3 units)

A grade = Distinction (To include 4 distinctions in level 3 units )

B grade = Distinction (To include 3 distinctions in level 3 units)

C grade = Merit (To include 5 merits in level 3 units )

D grade = Merit (to include 4 merits in level 3 units)

Diploma and Sub-Dip applicants may satisfy the requirement for an element of the offer grade profiles (equating to the final A-level grade stated in the standard 3A level offer profile - grade C) by substituting a combination of alternative qualifications to the same standard as defined by the University.

Irish Leaving Certificate

Irish Leaving Certificate

The Irish Leaving Certificate requirement for this course is grades

H3,H3,H3,H3, H3 -

H3,H3,H3,H3,H4 at higher level.

Scottish Highers

Scottish Highers

The Scottish Highers requirement for this course is grades

BBBCC -BBCCC.

Applicants may satisfy the requirement for an element of the offer grade profiles (equating to the final A-level grade stated in the standard 3A level offer profile - grade C) by substituting a combination of alternative qualifications to the same standard as defined by the University.

Scottish Advanced Highers

Scottish Advanced Highers

The Scottish Advanced Highers requirement for this course is grades

CCC -CCD.

Applicants may satisfy the requirement for an element of the offer grade profiles (equating to the final A-level grade stated in the standard 3A level offer profile - grade C) by substituting a combination of alternative qualifications to the same standard as defined by the University.

International Baccalaureate

International Baccalaureate

Overall International Baccalaureate profile minimum of

26 points to include 13 at higher level -

25 points to include 12 at higher level.

Access to Higher Education (HE)

Access to Higher Education (HE)

For Access qualifications validated by Ulster University or QUB the entry requirement is:

An overall mark of 70-65%

For GB QAA accredited Higher Education Diploma qualifications the entry requirement is as follows:

Award of the HE Diploma in a related subject area, achieving a minimum of 21-18 credits at distinction and 24 credits at merit in the 45 level 3 graded credits.

GCSE

Please refer to the University’s general entrance requirements.

GCSE

Please refer to the University’s general entrance requirements.

English Language Requirements

English Language Requirements

English language requirements for international applicants:


The minimum requirement for this course is Academic IELTS 6.0 with no band score less than 5.5.

Trinity ISE: Pass at level III also meets this requirement for Tier 4 visa purposes.

Ulster recognises a number of other English language tests and comparable IELTS equivalent scores.

Exemptions and transferability

The University will consider applications for entry with advanced standing on the basis of experiential learning, prior certificated learning and where articulation arrangements exist (i.e. on the basis of the Northern Ireland Media Academy agreement). We encourage applications from further education colleges, where students are suitably qualified for entry at year 2 and as outlined by the university admissions guidelines.

Careers & opportunities

Career options

Career options

Illustrative graduate roles include:

  • Directors and producers
  • Location managers
  • Writers and researchers
  • Broadcast Operators
  • Shoot Editors
  • Self Shooting Producers
  • Cinematographers and camera operators
  • Production designers and production managers
  • Vision mixers
  • Post-production editors
  • Post-production colour graders
  • Sound recordists for location film and television
  • Screenwriters
  • Script Editors
  • Moving Image Arts Teachers (after post-graduate year)
  • Market and media content producer
  • Youtuber
  • Digital Media Producer
  • Content creator for online and social platforms

Relevant progression routes within the University include MA Journalism and MSc Digital Media Communication. In addition, the school is developing specialist postgraduate programmes that will serve as a relevant progression route across the various programmes within the Ulster Screen Academy.

Work placement / study abroad

On successful completion of Year 2 studies, you have the opportunity to take the optional module Diploma in Professional Practice (DPP) or (DPPI). This provides an opportunity for you to gain first hand practical experience within a professional environment such as an advertising agency or brand consultancy prior to your final year of study. This module links the education experience to the real life situation of practice in the creative industries. It provides you with a range of experiences and skills relative to your practice, future career and professional development.

You also have the opportunity to take the other optional module Diploma in International Academic Studies (DIAS). This optional module provides an opportunity for you to undertake an extended period of study outside the UK and Republic of Ireland, developing an international perspective and an appreciation of cultural sensitivities which are desirable qualities in any graduate. You will develop an enhanced understanding of the academic discipline whilst generating educational and cultural networks.

Apply

Applications to full-time undergraduate degrees at Ulster are made through UCAS.

Start dates

  • September 2020

Fees and funding

Fees (per year)

Important notice - fees information Fees illustrated are based on 19/20 entry and are subject to an annual increase. Correct at the time of publishing. Terms and conditions apply. Additional mandatory costs are highlighted where they are known in advance. There are other costs associated with university study.
Visit our Fees pages for full details of fees

Northern Ireland & EU: £4,275.00

England, Scotland, Wales and the Islands: £9,250.00  Discounts available

International: £14,060.00 Scholarships available

Additional mandatory costs

Software for editing film and television projects will be provided when on campus as part of the significant facilities supplied to students to support their learning. Students wishing to edit film/sound/video away from the edit suites and off-campus may need to consider a student subscription to the Adobe Creative Suite. This is a small monthly cost and heavily discounted to students at university. Please see the Adobe UK website for accurate educational pricing. It is not a requirement.

Students will need to buy a USB 3 External Hard Drive for storing film rushes and completing their assessments. This size of storage should be at least 2TB and will cost between £50 and £90 as a one-off fee. The university does not supply these drivers and these can be bought freely.

Tuition fees and costs associated with accommodation, travel (including car parking charges), and normal living are a part of university life.

Where a course has additional mandatory expenses we make every effort to highlight them. These may include residential visits, field trips, materials (e.g. art, design, engineering) inoculations, security checks, computer equipment, uniforms, professional memberships etc.

We aim to provide students with the learning materials needed to support their studies. Our libraries are a valuable resource with an extensive collection of books and journals as well as first-class facilities and IT equipment. Computer suites and free wifi is also available on each of the campuses.

There will be some additional costs to being a student which cannot be itemised and these will be different for each student. You may choose to purchase your own textbooks and course materials or prefer your own computer and software. Printing and binding may also be required. There are additional fees for graduation ceremonies, examination resits and library fines. Additional costs vary from course to course.

Students choosing a period of paid work placement or study abroad as part of their course should be aware that there may be additional travel and living costs as well as tuition fees.

Please contact the course team for more information.

Contact

Course Director: Dr Declan Keeney

Ulster University-Belfast Campus

Telephone: +4428 95367390

Email: d.keeney@ulster.ac.uk

Admissions Office

T: +44 (0)28 9036 6309

E: admissionsce@ulster.ac.uk

International Admissions Office

E: internationaladmissions@ulster.ac.uk

For more information visit

Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

School of Communication and Media

Disclaimer

  1. The University endeavours to deliver courses and programmes of study in accordance with the description set out in this prospectus. The University’s prospectus is produced at the earliest possible date in order to provide maximum assistance to individuals considering applying for a course of study offered by the University. The University makes every effort to ensure that the information contained in the prospectus is accurate but it is possible that some changes will occur between the date of printing and the start of the academic year to which it relates. Please note that the University’s website is the most up-to-date source of information regarding courses and facilities and we strongly recommend that you always visit the website before making any commitments.
  2. Although reasonable steps are taken to provide the programmes and services described, the University cannot guarantee the provision of any course or facility and the University may make variations to the contents or methods of delivery of courses, discontinue, merge or combine courses and introduce new courses if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Such circumstances include (but are not limited to) industrial action, lack of demand, departure of key staff, changes in legislation or government policy including changes, if any, resulting from the UK departing the European Union, withdrawal or reduction of funding or other circumstances beyond the University’s reasonable control.
  3. If the University discontinues any courses, it will use its best endeavours to provide a suitable alternative course. In addition, courses may change during the course of study and in such circumstances the University will normally undertake a consultation process prior to any such changes being introduced and seek to ensure that no student is unreasonably prejudiced as a consequence of any such change.
  4. The University does not accept responsibility (other than through the negligence of the University, its staff or agents), for the consequences of any modification or cancellation of any course, or part of a course, offered by the University but will take into consideration the effects on individual students and seek to minimise the impact of such effects where reasonably practicable.
  5. The University cannot accept any liability for disruption to its provision of educational or other services caused by circumstances beyond its control, but the University will take all reasonable steps to minimise the resultant disruption to such services.
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