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Pharmacy
MPharm (Hons)

2020/21 Full-time Undergraduate course

Award:

Master of Pharmacy with Honours

Faculty:

Faculty of Life and Health Sciences

School:

School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences

Campus:

Coleraine campus

UCAS code:

B230
The UCAS code for Ulster University is U20

Start date:

September 2020

With this degree you could become:


  • Community pharmacist
  • Clinical pharmacist
  • Primary Care Pharmacist
  • Industrial pharmacist
  • Medicines Information pharmacist
  • Academic pharmacist
  • Pre Registration Pharmacist

Graduates from this course are now working for:


  • National Health Service
  • Community pharmacy
  • Pharmaceutical Industry
  • GP Federations

Overview

The MPharm programme at Ulster will provide you with an academically challenging and vocationally relevant pharmacy education and training.

Summary

The aim of the MPharm course at Ulster is to educate you, as a pharmacy student, to a high standard in an environment of modern clinical relevance, thereby facilitating your immediate integration into a forward thinking, healthcare-based profession that practises clinical excellence and understands fully the pharmaceutical principles underpinning therapeutic application of drug substances.

The MPharm programme at Ulster was ranked first in the UK for studying pharmacy for three years (Guardian League Tables). The small cohort of students at Ulster creates a supportive and collegiate environment in which you will be able to realise and maximise your potential. Specialised teaching laboratories, seminar rooms, a facsimile of a pharmacy shop, a computer suite, and a drug information suite have all been finished to a high specification for the delivery of the MPharm. You will be integrated into your chosen profession from the start of your studies with placements in community, hospital and industrial pharmacy. You will also learn alongside other students studying other healthcare professions, and will have workshops with patients.

This is an exciting time for the pharmacy profession, with the introduction of the Practice-Based Pharmacist to supplement the existing roles of the Community Pharmacist, the Hospital Pharmacist and the Industrial Pharmacist. If you are interested in applying scientific knowledge and evidence-base to improve patient-care and clinical outcomes, then pharmacy is the profession for you!


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About this course

About

The MPharm course at Ulster University, Coleraine is delivered from the Saad Centre for Pharmacy and Diabetes, by the School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. Specialised teaching laboratories, seminar rooms, a facsimile of a pharmacy shop, a computer suite, a drug information suite, store areas and staff accommodation have all been finished to a high specification for the delivery of the MPharm. MPharm students will also have access to the extensive facilities available to other courses on the Coleraine campus.

This is an exciting and challenging time for pharmacy. The government has introduced many changes that schools of pharmacy must deliver, including graduates with the clinical skills required to allow them to focus on patient-centred clinical care, i.e. to provide a more clinical MPharm. In order to provide high quality education in clinical practice, it recommends that schools of pharmacy increase their practice workforce and have an increased clinical input from practising pharmacists at Ulster. In Coleraine, we will achieve this by delivering a course that will provide a sound and comprehensive knowledge base developing into the clinical and professional practice of pharmacy. Appropriate modules will be delivered by practising community and clinical pharmacists, so that our students will be learning from both knowledge and experiences.

We will integrate as many of our students as we can into the profession from the start. There will be placements within all years of the course during pharmacy practice and clinical skills modules, to allow students to see in practice, both in hospital and community, what they are learning about in the classroom. This will promote the professional attitudes and behaviours expected of practising pharmacists. In addition, in some modules pharmacy students will be taught alongside students from other professions, in addition to case study analyses with these students, resulting in the valuable experience of interprofessional education. The hospital clinical placements will be delivered by clinical Teacher Practitioners based in Trust hospitals in Northern Ireland, while the community placements will be provided by independent and multiple community pharmacists within Northern Ireland. During these placements, students will be provided with portfolios to develop their learning skills, including lifelong learning and reflective and personal development skills.

The focus on providing a practice-based format to our teaching is illustrated in the staff competencies within the School – three pharmacy practice lecturers have all come from a practice background rather than an academic one, so their experience in the practice of pharmacy is evidence and experience based. In addition, the further development of practical experience is facilitated by developing partnerships with the employers in the region, so that students who wish to seek part-time employment, will be assisted in taking up this employment within their chosen profession from the start. This initiative has been named the ‘Pharmacy Job Shop’.

In the MPharm at Ulster University, the course team have produced an exciting, dynamic course that will meet the needs of the students, prospective employers and the pharmacy profession as a whole; resulting in graduates who have both the knowledge and social skills to begin their pharmacy career as competent junior pharmacists who are fit to practice. The integrated nature of the programme, where teaching is carried out within therapeutic areas, allows students to develop an understanding of 'Molecules to Man' - the journey of a drug compound from discovery and development, through formulation and drug delivery, to therapeutic treatment, clinical outcomes and patient-centred care.

Attendance

This is a 4 year full-time course.

Typically classes are timetabled from Monday to Friday between 9.15 am and 5.15 pm

Average attendance hours per week, 22 hours.

There is also directed and self-directed study time.

Start dates

  • September 2020

Teaching, Learning and Assessment

The programme is taught as an integrated spiral curriculum, with the integration of science and practice elements being explicitly taught through a systems approach. Lectures, tutorials, case study orientated problem-based learning, practical classes, including CAL packages, dispensing practical sessions, clinical and community pharmacy placements and private study, supported by essential and desirable reading, including self-directed learning. Integrated seminars, in which students work on integrated case studies, enhance the integrated nature of the programme and facilitate students understanding and engagement with the concepts. Groups and individual projects will be included. Material will be delivered by blended learning, where lectures, assignments, on-line tutorials and past exam questions will be available on-line on BBLearn; or fully online, whereby all lecture materials and assignments will only be available on BBLearn, but supported by tutorial classes. Postings on discussion areas within some modules will be required.

Assessments are outcome driven. Examinations and class tests, incorporating essay and multiple choice questions, will assess outcomes and facilitate learning and the integration of knowledge. Structured coursework will include practical reports, case studies, presentations, group reports, literature-based assignments and a research project report and poster presentations.

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    Content

    The content for each course is summarised on the relevant course page, along with an overview of the modules that make up the course.

    Each course is approved by the University and meets the expectations of:

    • the relevant generic national Qualification Descriptor
    • the applicable Subject Benchmark Statement
    • the requirements of any professional, regulatory, statutory and accrediting bodies.

    Attendance and Independent Study

    As part of your course induction, you will be provided with details of the organisation and management of the course, including attendance and assessment requirements - usually in the form of a timetable. For full-time courses, the precise timetable for each semester is not confirmed until close to the start date and may be subject to some change in the early weeks as all courses settle into their planned patterns. For part-time courses which require attendance on particular days and times, an expectation of the days and periods of attendance will be included in the letter of offer. A course handbook is also made available.

    Courses comprise modules for which the notional effort involved is indicated by its credit rating. Each credit point represents 10 hours of student effort. Undergraduate courses typically contain 10- or 20-credit modules (more usually 20) and postgraduate course typically 15- or 30-credit modules.

    The normal study load expectation for an undergraduate full-time course of study in the standard academic year is 120 credit points. This amounts to around 36-42 hours of expected teaching and learning per week, inclusive of attendance requirements for lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical work, fieldwork or other scheduled classes, private study, and assessment. Part-time study load is the same as full-time pro-rata, with each credit point representing 10 hours of student effort.

    Postgraduate Master’s courses typically comprise 180 credits, taken in three semesters when studied full-time. A Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) comprises 60 credits and can usually be completed on a part-time basis in one year. A 120-credit Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) can usually be completed on a part-time basis in two years.

    Class contact times vary by course and type of module. Typically, for a module predominantly delivered through lectures you can expect at least 3 contact hours per week (lectures/seminars/tutorials). Laboratory classes often require a greater intensity of attendance in blocks. Some modules may combine lecture and laboratory. The precise model will depend on the course you apply for and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. Prospective students will be consulted about any significant changes.

    Assessment

    Assessment methods vary and are defined explicitly in each module. Assessment can be a combination of examination and coursework but may also be only one of these methods. Assessment is designed to assess your achievement of the module’s stated learning outcomes. You can expect to receive timely feedback on all coursework assessment. The precise assessment will depend on the module and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

    Coursework can take many forms, for example: essay, report, seminar paper, test, presentation, dissertation, design, artefacts, portfolio, journal, group work. The precise form and combination of assessment will depend on the course you apply for and the module. Details will be made available in advance through induction, the course handbook, the module specification and the assessment timetable. The details are subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

    Normally, a module will have 4 learning outcomes, and no more than 2 items of assessment. An item of assessment can comprise more than one task. The notional workload and the equivalence across types of assessment is standardised.

    Calculation of the Final Award

    The class of Honours awarded in Bachelor’s degrees is usually determined by calculation of an aggregate mark based on performance across the modules at Levels 5 and 6, (which correspond to the second and third year of full-time attendance).

    Level 6 modules contribute 70% of the aggregate mark and Level 5 contributes 30% to the calculation of the class of the award. Classification of integrated Master’s degrees with Honours include a Level 7 component. The calculation in this case is: 50% Level 7, 30% Level 6, 20% Level 5. At least half the Level 5 modules must be studied at the University for Level 5 to be included in the calculation of the class.

    All other qualifications have an overall grade determined by results in modules from the final level of study. In Master’s degrees of more than 200 credit points the final 120 points usually determine the overall grading.

Academic profile

Academic staff of the School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences - https://www.ulster.ac.uk/departments/dvc/lhs/pharmacy-and-pharmaceutical-sciences

The University employs over 1,000 suitably qualified and experienced academic staff - 59% have PhDs in their subject field and many have professional body recognition.

Courses are taught by staff who are Professors (25%), Readers, Senior Lecturers (18%) or Lecturers (57%).

We require most academic staff to be qualified to teach in higher education: 82% hold either Postgraduate Certificates in Higher Education Practice or higher. Most academic staff (81%) are accredited fellows of the Higher Education Academy (HEA) - the university sector professional body for teaching and learning. Many academic and technical staff hold other professional body designations related to their subject or scholarly practice.

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    The profiles of many academic staff can be found on the University’s departmental websites and give a detailed insight into the range of staffing and expertise. The precise staffing for a course will depend on the department(s) involved and the availability and management of staff. This is subject to change annually and is confirmed in the timetable issued at the start of the course.

    Occasionally, teaching may be supplemented by suitably qualified part-time staff (usually qualified researchers) and specialist guest lecturers. In these cases, all staff are inducted, mostly through our staff development programme ‘First Steps to Teaching’. In some cases, usually for provision in one of our out-centres, Recognised University Teachers are involved, supported by the University in suitable professional development for teaching.

    Figures correct for academic year 2019-2020.

Coleraine campus

Our coastal and riverside campus with a primary academic focus on science and health.


Accommodation

A laid-back campus at the heart of a global tourist attraction.

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Sports Facilities

Our Campus in Coleraine boasts a variety of indoor and outdoor facilities that are open all year round to students and members of the public.

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Student support

At Student Support we provide many services to help students through their time at Ulster University.

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Coleraine campus location info

  Find out more about our Coleraine campus

Address

Ulster University
Cromore Road
Coleraine
County Londonderry
BT52 1SA

T: 028 7012 3456

Modules

Here is a guide to the subjects studied on this course.

Courses are continually reviewed to take advantage of new teaching approaches and developments in research, industry and the professions. Please be aware that modules may change for your year of entry. The exact modules available and their order may vary depending on course updates, staff availability, timetabling and student demand. Please contact the course team for the most up to date module list.

Year one

Professional Practice Skills 1 - Part A

Year: 1

To provide an overview of pharmacy and the profession in the delivery of pharmaceutical care to patients; pharmaceutical calculations and numeracy; basic statistical methods and core mathematical techniques used in experimental reports and research, and to develop essential learning skills. This module provides these concepts and professional skills within an integrated framework, at the beginning of a spiral curriculum which will revisit these key concepts and skills over the period of the MPharm degree.

Pharmaceutical Biosciences 1

Year: 1

This module provides an introduction to pharmaceutical biosciences. It covers the general descriptive physical, organic and inorganic chemistry and the principles underlying chemical properties and reactions of simple organic and inorganic compounds and provides and introduction to the study of human physiology and anatomy to underpin study in health and disease.

Pharmaceutical Biosciences 2

Year: 1

The module is designed to provide an introduction to biological systems and the cells and macromolecules involved in these systems, the chemical processes underlying life and the role of pharmaceutical chemical sciences for the study and understanding of structures, properties and behaviour of drug molecules which will interact with these systems

Professional Practice Skills 1 - Part B

Year: 1

To provide an overview of pharmaceutical legislation and the profession in the delivery of pharmaceutical care to patients to optimise patient outcomes. This module provides these concepts and professional skills within an integrated framework, at the beginning of a spiral curriculum which will revisit these key concepts and skills over the period of the MPharm degree.

Year two

Professional Practice Skills 2

Year: 2

To develop essential skills and understanding of the strategic context of pharmacy, and the application of standards and practice within pharmacy. To demonstrate ability to use professional decision making skills and apply the code of ethics for pharmacists in a range of situations requiring analysis. Maintaining the spiral theme of professional skills the students will also further develop their knowledge of the legislation that governs pharmacy professional practice, and will undertake work-based learning within community and hospital practice.

Central nervous system (inc. anaesthesia), joints, eye and ENT 1

Year: 2

The module will develop knowledge and understanding of the modes of action of pharmacological agents implicated in the treatment of diseases of the central nervous system, joints and the eye. Students will be able to develop an understanding and expertise in the qualitative and quantitative analysis of pharmaceutical products. The concepts and protocols associated with responding to symptoms (pain & musculoskeletal) including in paediatric patients are covered.

Cardiovascular, endocrine, renal, nutrition and blood 1

Year: 2

This module will provide the knowledge and professional skills required in the application of pharmaceutical chemistry, pharmaceutics and pharmacology to the therapeutic use of medical products pertaining to cardiovascular, endocrine, renal, nutrition and blood systems. It is taught within the integrated framework of a scientific degree, in the midst of a spiral curriculum which will cover, develop and implement upon these key concepts and skills relating to drugs that act on these systems over the period of the degree.

Respiratory, reproductive, urinary tract, skin, gastrointestinal and liver disease 1

Year: 2

To provide an understanding of physicochemical properties of drugs and excipients and how these contribute to formulation of medicines aimed for management of respiratory, reproductive, urinary tract, skin, gastrointestinal and liver diseases and how and why some of these medicines are dispensed. Students will also develop knowledge and understanding of the modes of action of pharmacological agents used to treat disorders of the respiratory system and GI tract as well as understanding endocrine control of reproduction and drugs affecting it.

Cancer, infection and immunology 1

Year: 2

This module will provide the knowledge and professional skills required in the application of pharmaceutical chemistry, pharmaceutics and pharmacology to the therapeutic use of medical products pertaining to the treatment of cancer, infection and immune disorders. It is taught within the integrated framework of a scientific degree, in the midst of a spiral curriculum which will cover, develop and implement upon these key concepts and skills relating to drugs that act on these systems over the period of the degree.

Year three

Professional Practice Skills 3

Year: 3

To provide the skills and knowledge to prepare a scientific proposal through critical review and evaluation with the application of research governance and ethics. To demonstrate ability to use professional decision making skills and apply the code of ethics in a range of situations requiring analysis. Maintaining the spiral theme of professional skills the students will also further develop their knowledge of professional practice, and will undertake work-based learning within community and hospital practice.

Cancer, Infection and Immunology 2

Year: 3

To provide an understanding of the principles underpinning the use of drugs in the treatment of cancer, infectious disease and disorders of the immune system and emphasising challenges presented using conventional approaches. It is taught within the integrated framework of a scientific degree, in the midst of a spiral curriculum which will cover, develop and implement upon these key concepts and skills relating to drugs that act on these systems over the period of the MPharm degree.

Cardiovascular, Endocrine, Renal, Nutrition and Blood 2

Year: 3

This module will also develop skills in critical thinking, communication, problem solving and both team and individual working, to enable students in their consideration of management of specific pathophysiologies from both a professional and patient point of view. Students level of knowledge continues to spiral upwards from the foundations of the first building blocks of pharmacy in relation to drug treatment for therapeutic areas, further inculcating an explicit understanding of where the traditional 'pharmaceutical sciences' integrate with practice and clinical teaching.

Central nervous system (inc. anaesthesia), joints, eye and ENT 2

Year: 3

To provide an overview of and develop appropriate knowledge and skills for applying physicochemical principles and preformulation information in relation to centrally acting drugs. To further develop essential skills in proprietary dispensing and responding to symptoms. This module will provide an awareness of the concepts and professional skills taught within the integrated framework of a scientific degree, in a spiral curriculum which will develop key concepts and skills relating to centrally acting drugs over the period of the MPharm degree.

Respiratory, reproductive, urinary tract, skin, gastrointestinal and liver disease 2

Year: 3

To provide an overview of and develop appropriate knowledge and skills for applying fundamental physicochemical principles and preformulation information to the design and production of stable pharmaceutical dosage forms in relation to drugs / medicinal products used for respiratory, reproductive, urinary tract, skin, gastrointestinal and liver diseases. This module will provide the student the opportunity to demonstrate professional skills taught within the integrated framework of a scientific degree.

Year four

Professional Practice Skills 4

Year: 4

This module will provide the, knowledge and understanding of pharmaceutical public health in relation to the practice of pharmacy and develop the professional attitudes and skills necessary for prescribing practice. It will provide an overview of the principles and applications of entrepreneurship. Maintaining the spiral theme of professional skills the students will also further develop their knowledge of the legislation that governs pharmacy professional practice, and will undertake work-based learning within community and hospital practice.

Translational Medicine 1

Year: 4

Translational medicine is about translating pharmaceutical research into practice - delivering the chemical entity to the patient in order to achieve a desired therapeutic outcome. This module facilitates this understanding in students by teaching through the use of case studies. Building on skills and knowledge acquired throughout the programme, this module explicitly takes a chemical entity from the drug discovery and development stage, through approval and marketing to use in the clinical setting and ultimately patient outcomes.

Translational medicines 2

Year: 4

Translational medicine is about translating pharmaceutical research into practice - delivering the chemical entity to the patient in order to achieve a desired therapeutic outcome. This module facilitates this understanding in students by teaching through the use of case studies. Building on skills and knowledge acquired throughout the programme, this module explicitly takes a chemical entity from the drug discovery and development stage, through approval and marketing to use in the clinical setting and ultimately patient outcomes.

Zoonoses and Public Health

Year: 4

To provide students with a comprehensive, detailed and systematic understanding of the impact of zoonoses on public health and the role of government, local authorities and pharmacy practice on zoonoses prevention and monitoring.

Research Project

Year: 4

This module provides experience in research philosophy, planning and methodology by relevant literature survey, and generation and evaluation of original data.

Business Practice and Commercial Awareness

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module provides students with the fundamental principles of business practice, commercial awareness and staff management and the opportunity to critically evaluate these principles within the context and application of pharmacy practice.

Complementary Medicines

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module provides students with the principles and background of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and its evaluation according to the principles of evidence-based practice.

Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module provides an introduction to the understanding of the formulation, characterisation, evaluation and application of novel pharmaceutical delivery systems based on nanotechnology.

Pharmacy Practice in the Republic of Ireland

Year: 4

This module is optional

To provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the legislative and practice requirements, and the organisational structures within which they will be working, for the practice of pharmacy in the Republic of Ireland.

Novel Targeting Agents in Cancer

Year: 4

This module is optional

To provide the students the opportunity to consider all of the issues relating to the development of a novel drug or formulation from early laboratory testing, through animal studies, human trials and the implementation of a licensed drug or formulation for use in oncology.

Entry conditions

We recognise a range of qualifications for admission to our courses. In addition to the specific entry conditions for this course you must also meet the University’s General Entrance Requirements.

A level

Grades AAB to include Chemistry and one science subject from Mathematics, Physics, Biology, Applied Science or Life and Health Sciences. Biology preferred as second science.

Applied Science or Life and Health Sciences Double Award is acceptable only when offered with A level Chemistry grade B or above.

Applied General Qualifications

*** To note that only qualifications defined as “Applied General” will be accepted for entry onto any undergraduate course at Ulster University.***

QCF Pearson BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma in Applied Science (Laboratory and Industrial Science) (2012 Suite)

Award profile of D*DD

The following units must be included and passed with Distinction:
Unit 1: Fundamentals of Science
Unit 4: Scientific Practical Techniques
Unit 26: Industrial Applications of Chemical Reactions
Unit 27: Chemical Periodicity and its Applications
Unit 28: Industrial Application of Organic Chemistry

RQF Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Applied Science (2016 Suite)

Award profile of DDD

The following optional units must be included and passed:
Unit 13: Applications of Inorganic Chemistry
​Unit 14: Applications of Organic chemistry
Unit 18: Industrial Chemical Reactions

QCF Pearson BTEC Level 3 Diploma in Pharmaceutical Science (2010 Suite)

Award profile of D*D plus A Level Chemistry grade A ORD*D* plus A Level Chemistry grade B

Irish Leaving Certificate

136 UCAS tariff points to include a minimum of 4 subjects at Higher Level including Chemistry and one other science from Maths, Biology, Physics or Agricultural Science at H2.

Applicants are also required to have Irish Leaving Certificate Higher Level English and Maths grade H6 or above or Irish Leaving Certificate Ordinary Level English and Maths grade O4 or above

Scottish Highers

Grades ABBBC to include Chemistry (grade B) and one science subject from Mathematics, Physics or Biology (grade B). Biology preferred as second science.

Scottish Advanced Highers

The Scottish Advanced Highers requirement for this course is grades BBC to include Chemistry (grade B) and one science subject from Mathematics, Physics or Biology(grade B). Biology preferred as second science.

International Baccalaureate

Overall International Baccalaureate profile minimum 28 points with at least 14 points at higher level and to include at least 6 points in HL Chemistry and at least 7 points from one other science subject at higher level (Physics, Biology or Maths).

Access to Higher Education (HE)

Overall profile of 73% (only Science Access courses) (120 credit Access Course) (NI Access Course)

Overall profile of 39 credits at distinction and 6 credits at merit (60 credit Access Course) (GB Access Course)

Higher Certificate in Science, Pharmacy Technician with an overall mark of 65% including 65% in each Chemistry module.

Higher Education Diploma, Pharmacy Technician with an overall mark of 70% including 70% in each Chemistry module.

GCSE

For full-time study, you must satisfy the General Entrance Requirements for admission to a first degree course and hold a GCSE pass at Grade C/4 or above in English Language, Mathematics and Double Award Science.

Please note that for purposes of entry to this course the Level 2 Certificate in Essential Skills - Application of Number is NOT regarded as an acceptable alternative to GCSE Maths.

English Language Requirements

English language requirements for international applicants
The minimum requirement for this course is Academic IELTS overall 6.5, with speaking 6.5 and no other band score less than 6.0.

Ulster recognises a number of other English language tests and comparable IELTS equivalent scores.

Additional Entry Requirements

Applicants should note that, as they will be engaged in 'regulated activity' involving children or vulnerable adults as part of their course, there is a compulsory, legal requirement to obtain an Enhanced Disclosure from AccessNI or other relevant authority. There is a cost for this service. More information on Enhanced Disclosures may be accessed at http://www.accessni.gov.uk/

Prospective students will be required to be in good health as evidenced from a satisfactory medical report (SENDO compliant). There is a cost for this service.

Prospective students should be aware that there are standards of knowledge, attitudes and behaviours that will be expected of students, and all students must abide with the GPhC Student Fitness to Practice procedures. Failure to comply could impair eligibility for a student to register as a pharmacist.

Prospective students should be aware that, in the interests of patient and public safety, your application form information will be shared with the Pharmacy Schools Council in order to verify your fitness to practise. If a fitness to practise outcome is made against you in the future, this information will be stored on this database.

Applicants should note that neither the General Pharmaceutical Council (GPhC) or the Pharmaceutical Society of Northern Ireland (PSNI) will offer prospective registration advice prior to commencing your MPharm. The GPhC / PSNI will carry out their own health and good character checks before registering an applicant, which are additional to the checks carried out by the university or a prospective employer. The GPhC / PSNI may not register a student if a check is failed, even if previous checks have been passed. An applicant may appeal against a registration refusal and appeals are heard by the Appeal Committee of the GPhC. Further information can be found at https://www.pharmacyregulation.org/raising-concerns/hearings/appeals.

Exemptions and transferability

Studies pursued and examinations passed in respect of other qualifications awarded by Ulster or by another university or educational institution, or evidence from the accreditation of prior experiential learning, may be accepted as exempting candidates from part of an approved programme of study provided that they shall register as students of the University for modules amounting to at least the final third of the credit value of the award at the highest level.


It is anticipated that only in exceptional cases will an exemption[s] be permitted, and any exemption must be approved by the professional/regulatory bodies governing the profession.

United States of America flagAdditional information for students from United States of America

Undergraduate

Each programme will have slightly different requirements, both in terms of overall points and certain subjects, so please check the relevant subject in the undergraduate on-line prospectus.

Normally Ulster University welcomes applications from students with:

Qualification
High School Diploma with overall GPA 3.0 and to include grades 3,3,3 in 3 AP subjects
High School Diploma with overall GPA 3.0 and to include 1000 out of 1600 in SAT
Associate Degree with GPA 3.0

English Language


Financial Information

In addition to the scholarships and bursaries open to all international students, US students may apply for Federal and Private US loans

Qualification
Level 12 English Lang in HSD

View more information for students from United States of America  

Careers & opportunities

Graduate employers

Graduates from this course are now working for:

  • National Health Service
  • Community pharmacy
  • Pharmaceutical Industry
  • GP Federations

Job roles

With this degree you could become:

  • Community pharmacist
  • Clinical pharmacist
  • Primary Care Pharmacist
  • Industrial pharmacist
  • Medicines Information pharmacist
  • Academic pharmacist
  • Pre Registration Pharmacist

Career options

The future role of pharmacists lies in meeting patients' needs through working closely with patients, other healthcare professionals, the National Health Service (NHS) and the industry. Pharmacists are the only healthcare professionals with a unique knowledge and understanding of medicines from manufacture to their applications in patients, encompassing discovery and development, manufacturing, quality assurance, distribution, therapeutics, management and monitoring.

Qualified registered pharmacists can choose careers from a number of available options including healthcare provision in the high street (community pharmacists), clinical pharmacy duties and outpatient clinics (hospital pharmacists), running disease management clinics in GP practices (pripractice-based pharmacists) and pursuing medicines research in industry or academia. Pharmacists can also be prescribers, which allow them to care for all patients' drug-related needs following medical diagnosis.

In summary, the career options for qualified pharmacists include hospital, community, primary care and industrial practice, general management and administration as well as research opportunities in industry, academia, or government laboratories. Opportunities are also available for MPharm graduates to enter into MRes and MPhil/PhD programmes.

Work placement / study abroad

The MPharm course at Ulster has periods of work placement within each year of study, during the Professional Practice Skills modules. Placements take place within community pharmacies throughout Northern Ireland, and within the Health and Social Care Trusts. Hospital placements are suported by the Northern Ireland Teacher-Practitioner Network. Short placement visits also take place to Nicobrand and Norbrook Pharmaceutical Industries. All placement experiences allow students to develop their skills and comptencies in the practice of pharmacy from the theoretical setting on campus, to the contextual and experiential learning achieved within the employed sectors. Students are responsible for their own travel arrangments to and from placement.

These short term placements involve:

Year 1 - 2 days in community pharmacy and 1 day in hospital pharmacy

Year 2 - 2 days in community pharmacy, 5 days with the hospital teacher-practitioner network, and 1 day visit to Norbrook

Year 3 - 3 days in community pharmacy, 5 days in hospital pharmacy and 1 day visit to Norbrook

Year 4 - 4 days in community pharmacy, 1 day with practice-based pharmacists, 5 days in hospital pharmacy

Professional recognition

General Pharmaceutical Council (GPhC)

Accredited by the General Pharmaceutical Council (GPhC) in order to progress to pharmacist pre-registration training and then to register as a pharmacist.

Pharmaceutical Society of Northern Ireland (PSNI)

Accredited by the Pharmaceutical Society of Northern Ireland (PSNI) for the purpose of registration with that body.

Apply

Applications to full-time undergraduate degrees at Ulster are made through UCAS.

Start dates

  • September 2020

Fees and funding

Fees (per year)

Important notice - fees information

The tuition fees stated are for Academic Year 2020/21 for NI/ EU excluding GB*

*GB applies to a student who normally lives in England, Wales, Scotland and the Islands (Channel Islands and the Isle of Man).

Academic Year 2020/21 International and GB fees are not currently available. Further fees will be published when approved.

Correct at the time of publishing. All fees are subject to an annual increase. Terms and conditions apply. Additional mandatory costs are highlighted where they are known in advance. There are other costs associated with university study.

Northern Ireland & EU: £4,395

Scholarships, awards and prizes

The School offers a suite of awards for academic achievement in each year of study.

Additional mandatory costs

Entry to the course is subject to a satisfactory medical check and also a criminal record check carried out through AccessNI. Students will be required to meet the costs of any vaccinations required and for the AccessNI checks. The current cost of an AccessNI Enhanced Disclosure is £33.

Students will be required to meet the travel costs of attending placements during the programme. Students will also be required to purchase required reading materials in the form of the BNF (annually) and Medicines, Ethics and Practice.

Tuition fees and costs associated with accommodation, travel (including car parking charges), and normal living are a part of university life.

Where a course has additional mandatory expenses we make every effort to highlight them. These may include residential visits, field trips, materials (e.g. art, design, engineering) inoculations, security checks, computer equipment, uniforms, professional memberships etc.

We aim to provide students with the learning materials needed to support their studies. Our libraries are a valuable resource with an extensive collection of books and journals as well as first-class facilities and IT equipment. Computer suites and free wifi is also available on each of the campuses.

There will be some additional costs to being a student which cannot be itemised and these will be different for each student. You may choose to purchase your own textbooks and course materials or prefer your own computer and software. Printing and binding may also be required. There are additional fees for graduation ceremonies, examination resits and library fines. Additional costs vary from course to course.

Students choosing a period of paid work placement or study abroad as part of their course should be aware that there may be additional travel and living costs as well as tuition fees.

Please contact the course team for more information.

Contact

Zara Moffatt/Karen Gibson, Admissions Office - Coleraine Campus

T: +44 (0)28 70123278 / +44 (0)28 70124353

E: z.moffatt@ulster.ac.uk / ki.gibson@ulster.ac.uk

International Admissions Office

T: +44 (0)28 7012 3333

E: internationaladmissions@ulster.ac.uk

For more information visit

Faculty of Life and Health Sciences

School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences

Disclaimer

  1. The University endeavours to deliver courses and programmes of study in accordance with the description set out in this prospectus. The University’s prospectus is produced at the earliest possible date in order to provide maximum assistance to individuals considering applying for a course of study offered by the University. The University makes every effort to ensure that the information contained in the prospectus is accurate but it is possible that some changes will occur between the date of printing and the start of the academic year to which it relates. Please note that the University’s website is the most up-to-date source of information regarding courses and facilities and we strongly recommend that you always visit the website before making any commitments.
  2. Although reasonable steps are taken to provide the programmes and services described, the University cannot guarantee the provision of any course or facility and the University may make variations to the contents or methods of delivery of courses, discontinue, merge or combine courses and introduce new courses if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Such circumstances include (but are not limited to) industrial action, lack of demand, departure of key staff, changes in legislation or government policy including changes, if any, resulting from the UK departing the European Union, withdrawal or reduction of funding or other circumstances beyond the University’s reasonable control.
  3. If the University discontinues any courses, it will use its best endeavours to provide a suitable alternative course. In addition, courses may change during the course of study and in such circumstances the University will normally undertake a consultation process prior to any such changes being introduced and seek to ensure that no student is unreasonably prejudiced as a consequence of any such change.
  4. The University does not accept responsibility (other than through the negligence of the University, its staff or agents), for the consequences of any modification or cancellation of any course, or part of a course, offered by the University but will take into consideration the effects on individual students and seek to minimise the impact of such effects where reasonably practicable.
  5. The University cannot accept any liability for disruption to its provision of educational or other services caused by circumstances beyond its control, but the University will take all reasonable steps to minimise the resultant disruption to such services.

Testimonials

"For me there was never a question about where I wanted to study pharmacy. From the first open day I knew that Coleraine was the school of pharmacy for me. Looking back now as a pharmacist the degree provided me with the most modern and in depth training needed to become a pharmacist after graduation. With a department of caring lectures and staff I really enjoyed Coleraine and the experience was invaluable" [Patrick Moylan].

“The small class sizes here at Ulster allow students and staff to engage in such a way that not only does the student-staff relations and teaching feel more personal, your university experience as a whole does so too! It is the perfect start to your journey into the world of Pharmacy!” [Aisling McGlinchey]

"‘The excellent teaching body and modern facilities at Ulster have maximised my learning potential, while smaller class sizes have enabled me to gain a more personal connection to peers and academic staff alike.’ [Ruth McClements]

“Studying at Ulster is one of the best decisions I have ever made. We had an extremely supportive and tight knit community within pharmacy, which was unlike other universities. Although pharmacy was never an easy course, there was always someone willing to help when you needed it. I made friends for life at Ulster while enjoying the beautiful scenes around us and the nightlife!
Following graduation I have had the opportunity to continue studying at Ulster while completing a PhD. I have had ample opportunities to further my career and there is always amazing advice and support at hand.” [Laura Hutchinson]

“I thoroughly enjoyed my time at Ulster studying Pharmacy. The small class size allows you to form a close relationship with your peers and allows the staff to build a rapport with students. All the staff are approachable are extremely enthusiastic, both in their teaching and research, and it was their enthusiasim that has inspired me to return to Ulster to study towards a PhD.” [Sara Gardner]

"The single best decision I made as a 17-year-old was to select Pharmacy at the University of Ulster on my UCAS application. On reflection, the course was delivered with exceptional standards of teaching and hands on practice experience that provided myself with invaluable skills and qualities I have used everyday to build my career as a pharmacist." [Louise Toner]

“I would strongly encourage anyone hoping to study pharmacy to choose Ulster. The course challenges you to think and behave like a pharmacist from the outset. For me, this meant that by the end of the 4 years I felt prepared and confident for my pre reg. I also found that outside of the classroom, the North coast is a great place to be a student.” [Rebecca Kennedy]