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Law with Irish
LLB (Hons)

2020/21 Part-time Undergraduate course

Award:

Bachelor of Laws with Honours

Faculty:

Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

School:

School of Law

Campus:

Magee campus

Start dates:

September 2020

August 2021

Overview

The Ulster Law School has an excellent reputation for teaching, research, student support and student development.

Summary

The School

The School of Law seeks to achieve excellence in teaching, research and professional development. The School provides a range of LLB courses, all of which are Qualifying Law Degrees (QLDs) for the purposes of the legal professions, as well as a range of postgraduate courses. Students at Ulster have the opportunity to draw upon the expertise of an internationally recognised group of researchers. Law at Ulster was ranked 4th in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), with 82% of publications ranked as world-leading or internationally excellent. The REF 2014 results also showcase the real-world impact of legal research at Ulster. In the new 'Research Impact' category, 100% of our work was scored as world-leading.

The Campus

The friendly village atmosphere of our Magee campus offers an intimate learning environment in the heart of Northern Ireland’s second city, Derry-Londonderry. Located in the North West of Northern Ireland and a short distance from County Donegal, Derry-Londonderry is ideally situated for exploring some of Ireland’s most dramatic landscapes. Ongoing investment has provided state-of-the-art teaching, research and support facilities for students and staff.


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About this course

About

A total of 18 law modules are studied over the course of five years. These modules include the core law modules needed for Qualifying Law Degree status.

You will undertake six modules at each level, up to 2 in each semester.

You will undertake 4 Law modules at level 4 and 2 Minor subject modules at level 4.

Level 4

Semester One

Introduction to Law– The ability to appreciate the basis of fundamental legal principles and to understand the United Kingdom legal system, its structure and organisation is generally recognised as one of the prerequisites of the study of law. This module provides students with the necessary knowledge and skills to acquire that ability.

Public Law– The ability to appreciate the basis of public law, the fundamental legal principles which underpin it, to understand how government operates and how public power is exercised is generally recognised as one of the prerequisites to the study of law. The module provides a basic grounding in core study skills, as applied to the subject of law. The course helps develop those skills, by providing practical opportunities for students to practice those skills and by introducing students to the concepts of reflective and independent learning.

Minor Optional Module

Semester Two

Criminal Law – The criminal law is an important area of legal practice, a key means by which the law seeks to protect society from undesirable or harmful behaviours and, equally importantly from the student’s perspective, a useful vehicle for familiarising oneself with legal principles, study techniques and research methods. Virtually every area of law is affected to some extent by the criminal law. It is essential that students become familiar with the basic principles underlying criminal law and learn to appreciate the relationship between it and the civil law. Criminal law provides the ideal vehicle for students to study both common law and legislation, and to develop their understanding of the relationship between law in Northern Ireland and in England and Wales. In examining the principle and substance of criminal law students will also have the opportunity to develop their skills in legal reasoning and analysis.

Introduction to Property Law – Property rights in relation to land are central to the functioning of economic and political systems based on capitalism and free market economy. Consequently, it is important for the law student to understand property rights in land or real estate, their justifications, and the underlying legal principles and framework for their categorisation and regulation in Northern Ireland, and England & Wales. The study of fundamental property principles in respect of the acquisition, protection and disposition of land will directly prepare the law student for further detailed study of property law at level 2 (Land Law) and at level 3 (Equity and Trusts) as well as complementing the study of aspects of Tort, Contract and even Criminal Law.

Minor Optional Module

Level 5

You will undertake 4 Law modules at level 5 and 2 Minor subject modules at level 5.

Semester One

Law of Tort – The law of tort is concerned with those situations where the conduct of one or more parties threatens harm to the interests of others. It is the purpose of this branch of the law to define the obligations imposed on each member of society and to adjust those losses which must inevitably result from the ever increasing activities of those who live in a common society by providing compensation for the harm suffered by those whose interests have been invaded owing to the conduct of others. The principles which govern this part of the civil law have been developed over the past 600 years and today account for the majority of civil legal actions, thus forming an important cornerstone of the modern legal system. The relationship which this area of law bears to other areas (such as the law of contract and criminal law) is also vital to an understanding of basic legal principles and procedures. The professional legal bodies recognize the importance of this subject by requiring law school graduate entrants to have acquired a sound knowledge of the law of tort as part of their degree.

Contract Law – The law of contract occupies a central place in any comprehensive study of law. Over time a substantial body of case law and legislation has developed to cover a range of business, commercial and trading transactions. It is necessary to know clearly the elements of contract law in order to understand the difference in relevant cases between proceedings attracting contractual and tortious liability. As the production, marketing, distribution and consumption processes of goods and services are usually carried out by means of contract, this subject is central to all legal agreements. In addition law graduates will increasingly find themselves involved in the tendering, negotiation and contracting processes which will increase in importance as new markets open up and as Eastern European countries increasingly adopt market economies. The professional legal bodies recognise the importance of this subject by requiring law school graduate entrants to have acquired a sound knowledge of contract law as part of their under graduate degree.

Minor Optional Module

Semester Two

European Law – An understanding of the relationship of European Union (EU) law and national law is important to the study of law and policy within the United Kingdom. The original objective of market integration within the European Economic Community (EEC) has taken European Law beyond its initial focus of free movement within an undistorted market into many areas of national law. Students therefore need to experience working with European Law in order to appreciate the ways in which it is distinctive from common law subjects and to understand the impact it has had on domestic law and governance.

Land Law– Land, or real property as it is frequently called, has traditionally been one of the most important sources of wealth in society. More recently many elements of Land law, especially the Law of Landlord and Tenant in the business sector, have gained particular practical importance in the commercial world. It is therefore essential that the law student has a suitable grounding in the rights and liabilities recognised under Land Law, which in turn underpins the law of conveyancing and the law of succession. The practical importance is recognised by professional bodies, which require law school graduate entrants to have studied Land Law at Degree Level. This module builds on the foundations laid in Introduction to Property Law and together the two modules satisfy the requirements (in respect of property law) of the legal professions in BOTH England and Wales and in Northern Ireland.

Minor Optional Module

Level Six

You will undertake 4 Law modules at level 6 and 2 Minor subject modules at level 6.

European Legal Studies

Diploma in International Academic Studies (DIAS)

Diploma in Professional Practice (DPP)

OR

Optional Modules. Not all electives may run in all academic years. (Please note numbers may be capped on some final year electives).

Semester One

Equity and Trusts – This module will explore the history of equity and its maxims, the development of the trust and its various forms, uses and practical implications today. It will consider how trusts can be varied and set aside, the powers and duties of trustees and the remedies for breach of trust. It will also examine equitable doctrines such as conversion and election and survey the law relating to equitable remedies such as injunctions.

Human Rights Law - This module is designed to provide students with a sophisticated analysis of the legal structures governing human rights law and its enforcement at both domestic and international level. Increasingly, human rights standards play a role in shaping the form of international relations. At the international level, the principal documents are the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948); the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR 1966) and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR 1966) – collectively known as the ‘International Bill of Rights’. At a regional level, the Council of Europe’s European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) (1950) now extends to 47 states. The provisions of the European Convention are strengthened by additional rights contained in additional protocols to this treaty. While the ECHR presents the most effective of regional mechanisms of human rights, other notable regional human rights treaties include the American Convention on Human Rights (1969) and the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights (1981). However, in this module we will be focusing primarily on the ECHR.

Company Law- Change continues to take place with company law, at times, appearing to be in a permanent state of flux with new legislation and a constant stream of new cases. In this module students will be introduced to the body of rules and principles of law which regulate registered companies, both public and private. The module will deal with the main forms of business organisations within the UK, their management and contracting powers. This module introduces students to the body of rules and principles of law which regulate public and private companies. It is of practical significance to all those who wish to make a career in, or have dealings with, such companies.

Social Justice - An understanding of the relationship between the state and citizen, and the contractual and moral obligations of each, is the key to understanding the changing nature of the law as it relates to social justice issues. This module explores the way in which the law deals with social justice issues by providing insight into the effects of Government policies, legislation and case law on these issues. The module is centered around the theme of poverty and its relationship with other social justice themes like crime control, social control, conflict, health, and social exclusion, its impact on vulnerable groups and the treatment of these vulnerable groups, and its implications for citizenship and society.

Law, Film and Visual Culture - This module will examine the relationship of law to visual culture, and the influence that they have on each other. It will be based on critical evaluation of legal texts and provisions, and of filmic, dramatic and other visual material.

Legal Technology: Innovation and Informatics - Traditional law and technology courses have looked to the regulation of new technologies, and therefore the restrictive power of law on the use and development of new technologies (in terms of privacy, intellectual property, security). This module looks at the other side of the picture; the ways in which new technological developments will influence the future development of law, legal service provision and access to justice. For example: what are the possibilities for online dispute resolution to take on part of the burden that has traditionally devolved to either the courts or more recently tribunals? What are the implications of new informatic developments for particular levels of mundane legal work to be done by intelligent computer systems, and what will remain for human actors? What are the likely knock-on effects for the future of legal education, and for the legal professions? To what degree will future lawyers be required to be legal technologists, and what level of training will they need for this to be realised? How do new forms of technology address issues of access to justice? What does technology have to do with design thinking, and what is meant by the term ‘visual law’? In short, the module will elaborate the changing face of legal practice, give a grounding in basic concepts and technologies, investigate the opportunities and risks of the changing dynamics of law due to increasingly sophisticated informatic systems and look to the changing face of law as a result of these changes.

Semester Two

Law of Evidence – The Law of Evidence is important for anyone studying law with a view to practice. Similarly, those involved in any profession which may involve them in litigation will benefit from an understanding of how the legal system operates in examining and prioritising evidence. The module is required in Northern Ireland to attain a ‘qualifying’ law degree (that is, a degree recognised by the professional legal bodies within Northern Ireland). This module will complement other substantive law modules, particularly criminal law, both in the legal knowledge acquired and through the further development of skills of legal analysis, problem solving and critical thinking.

Dissertation – Dissertation research and writing skills are essential an integral part of legal training that would prepare law students for professional practice, which requires independent investigative research and brief writing. This module would prepare law students for this critical role.

Public International Law - Public International Law is a necessary complement to the study of virtually all domestic law modules. Every branch of municipal law is inevitably under the constraints of a growing number of obligations stemming from international law obligations. Understanding key issues of international law, including its sources, institutions and measures of enforcement, is central for any student of law. A student of law must be confident working not only with domestic statutes and case law, but also to be able to locate, interpret and apply international legal materials. Additionally, international law increasingly imposes obligations which are necessary to take into account comprehending how States and other actors interact in the international system.

Employment Law - The importance of the employment relationship between employers, employees, unions and other statutory bodies and agencies is such that a thorough knowledge of both the context and the substantive law is necessary for those involved in this area in any capacity. The module attempts to provide the basis for this knowledge and to put you in the position where you may not only have an understanding of the law both conceptually and substantively, but also be in a position to use that knowledge in the solution of problems.

Law and the Family - This module explores the ways in which the law deals with the family and with issues that arise with respect to families, including marital breakdown, domestic violence, and child abuse, as well as providing insights into the forces which share family law, thus making it less of a private area of activity than is sometimes thought.

Computer and Internet Law - The main rationale for the Computer & Internet Law module, is to teach students the principles and concepts on computer and the internet in the United Kingdom, the European Union, and selected international jurisdictions. While some of these legal concepts are traditional and familiar, others are sui generis and new regulatory innovations, especially designed to combat the social, cultural, and legal challenges posed by the widespread use of networked computers on intranet and internet. Contemporary legal problems pertaining to the use of networked computers range from unauthorised access to, and use of computing facilities; computer crimes; property rights in software and data; privacy rights in data; network neutrality; legal status of software; commercial electronic mail; unsolicited commercial electronic mail; access and free speech rights to protected data and network; to electronic surveillance and monitoring. The legal problems associated with the aforesaid issues will be discussed at lecture and seminar sessions.

Legal Practice - Clinical legal education is an excellent way of both training practitioners and achieving wider educational aims. This module is designed to allow UG Law students the opportunity to experience law in practice. Those who take the module will be given a unique opportunity to experience real life clients and to practice law in a fully operational legal office. They will gain the skills required to take a legal enquiry, interview a client, identify and research the legal issues, and advise the client on the potential outcomes available to them. Consequently, students on this module will leave with a highly relevant skill-set to their future legal careers, which will be very attractive to potential employers.

Attendance

Each module of study usually involves two hours of lectures plus a one hour seminar each week. In addition, students are required to undertake substantial directed independent learning. Generally, three modules are studied per semester on the full time programme.

Start dates

  • September 2020
  • August 2021

Teaching, Learning and Assessment

Content

The content for each course is summarised on the relevant course page, along with an overview of the modules that make up the course.

Each course is approved by the University and meets the expectations of:

- the relevant generic national Qualification Descriptor

- the applicable Subject Benchmark Statement

- the requirements of any professional, regulatory, statutory and accrediting bodies.

Attendance and Independent Study

As part of your course induction, you will be provided with details of the organisation and management of the course, including attendance and assessment requirements - usually in the form of a timetable. For part-time courses which require attendance on particular days and times, an expectation of the days and periods of attendance will be included in the letter of offer. A course handbook is also made available.

Courses comprise modules for which the notional effort involved is indicated by its credit rating. Each credit point represents 10 hours of student effort. Undergraduate courses typically contain 10- or 20-credit modules (more usually 20).

The normal study load expectation for an undergraduate full-time course of study in the standard academic year is 120 credit points. This amounts to around 36-42 hours of expected teaching and learning per week, inclusive of attendance requirements for lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical work, fieldwork or other scheduled classes, private study, and assessment. Part-time study load is the same as full-time pro-rata, with each credit point representing 10 hours of student effort.

Class contact times vary by course and type of module. Typically, for a module predominantly delivered through lectures you can expect at least 3 contact hours per week (lectures/seminars). The precise model will depend on the course you apply for and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. Prospective students will be consulted about any significant changes.

Assessment

Assessment methods vary and are defined explicitly in each module. Assessment can be a combination of examination and coursework but may also be only one of these methods. Assessment is designed to assess your achievement of the module’s stated learning outcomes. You can expect to receive timely feedback on all coursework assessment. The precise assessment will depend on the module and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

Coursework can take many forms, for example: essay, report, seminar paper, test, presentation, dissertation, design, artefacts, portfolio, journal, group work. The precise form and combination of assessment will depend on the course you apply for and the module. Details will be made available in advance through induction, the course handbook, the module specification and the assessment timetable. The details are subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

Normally, a module will have 4 learning outcomes, and no more than 2 items of assessment. An item of assessment can comprise more than one task. The notional workload and the equivalence across types of assessment is standardised.

Calculation of the Final Award

The class of Honours awarded in Bachelor’s degrees is usually determined by calculation of an aggregate mark based on performance across the modules at Levels 5 and 6, (which correspond to the second and third year of full-time attendance). Level 6 modules contribute 70% of the aggregate mark and Level 5 contributes 30% to the calculation of the class of the award.

  • Read more

    Content

    The content for each course is summarised on the relevant course page, along with an overview of the modules that make up the course.

    Each course is approved by the University and meets the expectations of:

    • the relevant generic national Qualification Descriptor
    • the applicable Subject Benchmark Statement
    • the requirements of any professional, regulatory, statutory and accrediting bodies.

    Attendance and Independent Study

    As part of your course induction, you will be provided with details of the organisation and management of the course, including attendance and assessment requirements - usually in the form of a timetable. For full-time courses, the precise timetable for each semester is not confirmed until close to the start date and may be subject to some change in the early weeks as all courses settle into their planned patterns. For part-time courses which require attendance on particular days and times, an expectation of the days and periods of attendance will be included in the letter of offer. A course handbook is also made available.

    Courses comprise modules for which the notional effort involved is indicated by its credit rating. Each credit point represents 10 hours of student effort. Undergraduate courses typically contain 10- or 20-credit modules (more usually 20) and postgraduate course typically 15- or 30-credit modules.

    The normal study load expectation for an undergraduate full-time course of study in the standard academic year is 120 credit points. This amounts to around 36-42 hours of expected teaching and learning per week, inclusive of attendance requirements for lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical work, fieldwork or other scheduled classes, private study, and assessment. Part-time study load is the same as full-time pro-rata, with each credit point representing 10 hours of student effort.

    Postgraduate Master’s courses typically comprise 180 credits, taken in three semesters when studied full-time. A Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) comprises 60 credits and can usually be completed on a part-time basis in one year. A 120-credit Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) can usually be completed on a part-time basis in two years.

    Class contact times vary by course and type of module. Typically, for a module predominantly delivered through lectures you can expect at least 3 contact hours per week (lectures/seminars/tutorials). Laboratory classes often require a greater intensity of attendance in blocks. Some modules may combine lecture and laboratory. The precise model will depend on the course you apply for and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. Prospective students will be consulted about any significant changes.

    Assessment

    Assessment methods vary and are defined explicitly in each module. Assessment can be a combination of examination and coursework but may also be only one of these methods. Assessment is designed to assess your achievement of the module’s stated learning outcomes. You can expect to receive timely feedback on all coursework assessment. The precise assessment will depend on the module and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

    Coursework can take many forms, for example: essay, report, seminar paper, test, presentation, dissertation, design, artefacts, portfolio, journal, group work. The precise form and combination of assessment will depend on the course you apply for and the module. Details will be made available in advance through induction, the course handbook, the module specification and the assessment timetable. The details are subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

    Normally, a module will have 4 learning outcomes, and no more than 2 items of assessment. An item of assessment can comprise more than one task. The notional workload and the equivalence across types of assessment is standardised.

    Calculation of the Final Award

    The class of Honours awarded in Bachelor’s degrees is usually determined by calculation of an aggregate mark based on performance across the modules at Levels 5 and 6, (which correspond to the second and third year of full-time attendance).

    Level 6 modules contribute 70% of the aggregate mark and Level 5 contributes 30% to the calculation of the class of the award. Classification of integrated Master’s degrees with Honours include a Level 7 component. The calculation in this case is: 50% Level 7, 30% Level 6, 20% Level 5. At least half the Level 5 modules must be studied at the University for Level 5 to be included in the calculation of the class.

    All other qualifications have an overall grade determined by results in modules from the final level of study. In Master’s degrees of more than 200 credit points the final 120 points usually determine the overall grading.

Academic profile

The School aims to provide a broadly ‘socio-legal’ education, with specialist teaching from academics in a variety of fields and those from previous professional practice who can provide the invaluable ‘taste’ of law-in-action. The School includes the award-winning Ulster Law Clinic, the Legal Innovation Centre and the globally recognised Transitional Justice Institute.

The University employs over 1,000 suitably qualified and experienced academic staff - 59% have PhDs in their subject field and many have professional body recognition.

Courses are taught by staff who are Professors (25%), Readers, Senior Lecturers (18%) or Lecturers (57%).

We require most academic staff to be qualified to teach in higher education: 82% hold either Postgraduate Certificates in Higher Education Practice or higher. Most academic staff (81%) are accredited fellows of the Higher Education Academy (HEA) - the university sector professional body for teaching and learning. Many academic and technical staff hold other professional body designations related to their subject or scholarly practice.

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    The profiles of many academic staff can be found on the University’s departmental websites and give a detailed insight into the range of staffing and expertise. The precise staffing for a course will depend on the department(s) involved and the availability and management of staff. This is subject to change annually and is confirmed in the timetable issued at the start of the course.

    Occasionally, teaching may be supplemented by suitably qualified part-time staff (usually qualified researchers) and specialist guest lecturers. In these cases, all staff are inducted, mostly through our staff development programme ‘First Steps to Teaching’. In some cases, usually for provision in one of our out-centres, Recognised University Teachers are involved, supported by the University in suitable professional development for teaching.

    Figures correct for academic year 2019-2020.

Magee campus

Our vision is aligned to the strategic growth plan for the city and region.


Accommodation

Enjoy student life in one of Europe's most vibrant cities.

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Sports Facilities

Our facilities in Magee cater for many sports ranging from archery to volleyball, and are open to students and members of the public all year round.

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Student support

At Student Support we provide many services to help students through their time at Ulster University.

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Address

Ulster University
Northland Road
Derry~Londonderry
County Londonderry
BT48 7JL

T: 028 7012 3456

Modules

Here is a guide to the subjects studied on this course.

Courses are continually reviewed to take advantage of new teaching approaches and developments in research, industry and the professions. Please be aware that modules may change for your year of entry. The exact modules available and their order may vary depending on course updates, staff availability, timetabling and student demand. Please contact the course team for the most up to date module list.

Year one

Criminal Law

Year: 1

Criminal law is the body of statute and common law that has developed in an attempt to protect society from certain activities that have been deemed socially harmful. The module develops students' knowledge of the criminal law, and essential skills for legal study. Students will test their ability to apply the law to problem scenarios as well as learning to identify and critique problems with the law evaluate arguments for and against change.

Exploring Law

Year: 1

This module introduces basic legal principles and concepts, and enables students to understand the structure and organisation of the legal system in the UK (with a particular emphasis on Northern Ireland). It introduces students to the concepts of reflective and independent learning, and provides them with the necessary information, knowledge and intellectual equipment required for the study of law as a discipline. This module continues the induction process and offers the students an opportunity to obtain information about careers and personal development. Formal assessment on this module is by an online assessment exercise and coursework.

Criminal law

Year: 1

Criminal law provides the ideal vehicle to study both common law and legislation and develop an understanding of the relationship between law in Northern Ireland and the law in England and Wales. Students learn the scope and content of criminal law and understand the need for reform in certain areas through academic commentary and critical discussion and evaluation. In examining the principle and substance of criminal law students also gain the opportunity to develop skills in legal reasoning and analysis.

Year two

Introduction to Law

Year: 2

This module covers basic legal principles and concepts, enabling students to understand the United Kingdom's legal system, its structure and organisation. This module provides students with the necessary knowledge and skills to study law. This module continues the induction process and also offers students an opportunity to obtain information about careers and personal development and to observe the legal system in practice, via court visits and events such as guest speakers.

Introduction to Property Law

Year: 2

This module provides students with introductory knowledge of property law in both Northern Ireland and England and Wales. Key topics include the concept of property rights in land; nature and history of property rights in Northern Ireland; methods for acquisition of property interests in Northern Ireland and England & Wales; adverse possession in Northern Ireland and England & Wales; leases; licences; etc.

Public Law 1

Year: 2

A thorough knowledge of the constitutional basis is necessary in order to appreciate the powers and responsibilities of government and the limit to its competence. This module examines the constitutional arrangements of the UK, dealing in detail with constitutional matters that affect Northern Ireland, allowing students to appreciate the powers and responsibilities of both central and devolved government and the limit to the competences of each tier of government. The module also explores the history and evolution of the constitutional norms that shape UK legal constitutional discourse. Students are also introduced to the Human Rights Act 1998 and to the theory of, procedure for, and the grounds for judicial review.

Public Law

Year: 2

Students by the end of this module should have a good grasp of the constitutional arrangements within the United Kingdom including: institutions of government, key principles underpinning the constitution of the United Kingdom, the arrangements for devolved governance in Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales, the importance of European Union Law as a source of law within the constitution of the United Kingdom, the legal protection of human rights and civil liberties, mechanisms of accountability within constitutional law, especially judicial review, and proposed reforms and debates surrounding such reforms.

Law of Tort

Year: 2

The law of tort plays a central role in the modern legal system, and it is important that anyone engaged in a study of law should have a detailed knowledge and understanding of the principles of the law of tort. This module will explore those principles in detail and will enable students to apply the principles to practical problems and real-life situations.

Law of Tort

Year: 2

The law of tort plays a central role in the modern legal system, and it is important that anyone engaged in a study of law should have a detailed knowledge and understanding of the principles of the law of tort. This module will explore those principles in detail and will enable students to apply the principles to practical problems and real-life situations.

Contract law

Year: 2

The module will provide a basis for acquiring knowledge and understanding and developing analysis of the key concepts, problems and issues in the law of contract. The theories, principles and rules of the law of contract will be explained. The module will address the key features of contract law including, formation of contract, exclusion clauses, vitiating factors, discharge of contract and remedies

Year three

Contract Law

Year: 3

The module will provide a basis for acquiring knowledge and understanding and developing analysis of the key concepts, problems and issues in the law of contract. The theories, principles and rules of the law of contract will be explained. The module will address the key features of contract law including formation of contract, contractual terms, exclusion and limitation clauses, vitiating factors, discharge of contract and remedies.

Land Law

Year: 3

This module provides students with the opportunity to study Land Law (which is considered to be a core subject in the study of law) in respect to both Northern Ireland and England and Wales. The professional bodies require law school graduate entrants to have studied Land Law at Degree Level. This module (together with Introduction to Property Law) satisfies the requirements of the professions in both jurisdictions.

Land Law

Year: 3

This module provides students with the opportunity to study Land Law (which is considered to be a core subject in the study of law) in respect to both Northern Ireland and England and Wales. The professional bodies require law school graduate entrants to have studied Land Law at Degree Level. This module (together with Introduction to Property Law) satisfies the requirements of the professions in both jurisdictions.

European Law

Year: 3

This module provides an overview of the constitutional principles and legal institutions of the European Union and the development of the European Union from its original inception as the European Community. The importance of law in the development of the European Union as a 'supranational organisation' is examined in the context of concepts such as supremacy and direct effect contributing to enforcement of EU law. The module also introduces students to some central areas within the market integration process as well as contemporary issues such as the legal ramifications of BREXIT.

Year four

European Law

Year: 4

This module provides an overview of the constitutional principles and legal institutions of the European Union. The module also introduces students to the central areas within the market integration process, namely free movement of goods and persons. After the Treaties of Amsterdam, Nice and Lisbon, the impact of EU law has expanded even further than before. This module examines the development of European Law, the institutional structure and processes as well as the relationship between European Law and national law.

Introduction to Property Law

Year: 4

This module provides students with an introduction to the core concepts of property law in both Northern Ireland and England and Wales. This module will directly prepare you for further detailed study of property law at level 5 (Land Law) and at level 6 (Equity and Trusts) as well as complementing the study of aspects of Tort, Contract and even Criminal Law. Completion of this module and Land Law (LAW311) in semester 2 year 2 allows you to meet the requirements of the professional bodies (in respect of property law) in both Northern Ireland and England and Wales.

Law of Evidence

Year: 4

The Law of Evidence is key to understanding the judicial system. This module examines the fundamental principles of, and a number of important and controversial issues in, the modern law of evidence. Students will learn to apply the key rules and understand the exercise of judicial discretion on the admission of evidence to court and be encouraged to critique and challenge current rules and practice. The module complements other law modules, particularly criminal law.

Equity and Trusts

Year: 4

This module will explore the history and development of equity and of its maxims, the development of the trust and the various types of trust, its various forms, uses and practical implications today. It will consider how trusts can be varied and set aside, the powers and duties of trustees and the remedies for breach of trust. It will also examine equitable doctrines such as conversion and election and survey the law relating to equitable remedies such as injunctions.

Public International Law

Year: 4

This module is optional

The module introduces students to the basic concepts of public international law and the role that it serves in international affairs as well as in the domestic legal order. Public International Law permeates every branch of municipal law and this module will enable students to understand key issues of international law, including its sources, institutions and measures of enforcement.

Human Rights Law

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module enables students to master the complex area of human rights law. Students will be encouraged to develop an in-depth critical understanding of both the content of human rights law standards and the various means by which it is enforced. Students will come to see both the strengths and weaknesses of human rights law and to appreciate the system of international, regional and national enforcement mechanisms which seek to protect and promote human rights.

Year five

Dissertation

Year: 5

The dissertation is designed to allow the student to integrate key skills and knowledge acquired from the course and to relate these to a specific issue or issues in law. Students are expected to produce a sophisticated, original piece of research and writing on a legal issue. The module will consolidate and build upon the skills which students will have gained in other modules e.g. ITL, Legal Research Methods.

Dissertation - Law

Year: 5

This module provides students with the opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of independent, scholarly research in a chosen area of law.

Law of Evidence

Year: 5

This module is optional

This module will provide students with access to a comprehensive programme of study which will examine fundamental principles of the law of evidence, amd analyse a number of important and controversial issues in the modern law. It will also provide students with an understanding of the operation of evidential rules within the civil and criminal justice systems in a manner which accords with national professional standards.

Transitional Justice

Year: 5

This module is optional

This module explores the real-life dilemmas negotiated in countries emerging from dictatorship and conflict. These include whether legal mechanisms can assist in achieving truth, justice, and/or reconciliation; or whether these goals are sometimes antithetical. The module will enable students to engage with international humanitarian law and human rights law, and in particular. The module also serves as an introduction to concepts and issues that are explored in greater depth in the LLM in Human Rights and Transitional Justice offered at the University of Ulster.

Medical Law

Year: 5

This module is optional

The aim of this module is to examine the law's involvement with medicine and to raise ethical and contextual awareness of selected medical topics.

Surveillance and the Law

Year: 5

This module is optional

This module explores and evaluates the legal framework within which surveillance operates in the United Kingdom. Considering the role of surveillance in society, the relationship between surveillance, privacy rights and fair trial rights is evaluated with specific reference to data protection, interception of communications, directed and intrusive surveillance, official secrecy, the security and intelligence services and recent developments in relation to identity and identity theft.

Employment law

Year: 5

This module is optional

The importance of the employment relationship between employers, employees, unions and other statutory bodies and agencies is such that a thorough knowledge of both the context and the substantive law is necessary for those involved in this area in any capacity. The module attempts to provide the basis for this knowledge and to put students in the position where they may not only have an understanding of the law both conceptually and substantively, but also be in a position to use that knowledge prophylactically and in the solution of problems.

Media Law

Year: 5

This module is optional

The study of media law requires students to understand basic legal principles in such areas as freedom of speech, intellectual property, contempt of court, defamation, parliamentary privilege and copyright. It also requires the students to acquire certain skills, such as those of instant recall, analysis, argumentation and articulation, and the ability to apply legal principles to practical problems. This module provides the necessary information, knowledge and intellectual equipment to acquire such knowledge and skills.

Company Law

Year: 5

This module is optional

This module introduces students to the body of rules and principles of law which regulate public and private companies. It is of practical significance to all those who wish to make a career in, or have dealings with, such companies.

Land: Rights, Resources and the Environment

Year: 5

This module is optional

This module explores this tension between the conception of land as a bundle of rights and land as a resource for the common good, with a particular focus on environmental concerns. The module will consider: the relationship(s) between land owners/users and the state; fundamentals of environmental law; land, human rights and the environment; planning and the environment; conservation of the natural environment; land as a diminishing resource (flooding and coastal erosion) and trespass/control of access to land.

Social Justice

Year: 5

This module is optional

An understanding of the relationship between the state and citizen, and the contractual and moral obligations of each, is the key to understanding the changing nature of the law as it relates to social justice issues. This module explores the way in which the law deals with social justice issues by providing insight into the effects of Government policies, legislation and case law on these issues. The module is centred around the theme of poverty and its relationship with other social justice themes like crime control, social control, conflict, health, and social exclusion, its impact on vulnerable groups and the treatment of those vulnerable groups, and its implications for citizenship and society.

Street Law

Year: 5

This module is optional

Street Law is a practical, placement based law module to allow students to develop their legal skills outside the classroom, and appreciate law in society. The module is based primarily in schools groups where students work in pairs over an 8 week placement period and 'teach' law to young people, act as a resource for schools and their pupils, and work with schools and young people to develop subject appropriate information sessions. The practical, professional and transferable skills gained from this are unique to this module and provide students with the opportunity to see first hand how law can impact on young people's attitudes and knowledge, as well as providing students with the academic development necessary for a level 6 module.

Human Rights Law

Year: 5

This module is optional

The module builds on other law modules in terms of examining fundamental principles underlying the legislative process as a whole. Through an indepth analysis of human rights protection at a range of levels, (internationally, regionally and domestically) students will have the opportunity to explore key areas of concern on both a theoretical level and through case studies on a more practical basis.

Law of Armed Conflict

Year: 5

This module is optional

This module examines the role of international humanitarian law in situations of armed conflict and the extent to which it applies to military operations in societies emerging from conflict. International humanitarian law may play a role in mitigating the effects of the use of armed force, for example in regulating the conduct of hostilities and in the protection of civilians; but it also permits high levels of violence provided certain core rules are observed.

Law, film and visual culture

Year: 5

This module is optional

Law, Film and Visual Culture is a deliberately alternative approach to the traditional study of law, both in terms of the basic materials used to ground an approach to the topics under study, and in the teaching arrangements. It is an attempt to foster a developed spirit and capacity in critical intelligence in relation to the cultural make-up of the social environment and thus aims for wide applicability and to break the notion of law as confined to a specific arena.

Law and the Family

Year: 5

This module is optional

The module explores the ways in which the law regulates the family and deals with issues such as marital breakdown, domestic violence, and child abuse. As well as critically addressing this range of issues, it also provides insights into the forces that shape family law, and render it less of a private area of activity than is sometimes thought. Family law is an area of concern to policy-makers, social scientists and politicians alike, as well as lawyers, and is a subject of continued, heated, debate.

Legal Practice (UG Law Clinic)

Year: 5

This module is optional

This module is taught using clinical legal education and is designed to introduce students to the knowledge and skills required for legal practice. Through the facts of a mock social security case, students will open and manage a client file, conduct a client interview, identify the relevant legal issues, research the legal issues, determine the best course of action in the case and prepare a letter of advice to the client. This will be done in the Ulster University Law Clinic using the same procedures and methods as are employed there when dealing with real cases. The module will culminate in students conducting a live client interview, to gather information about a real client's case. The module is assessed through the real client interview (competent/not yet competent) and the subsequent preparation of a letter of advice. On completion of the module, students will have acquired the skills necessary for competent legal practice and will have had experience of handling a client interview.

Legal Technology: Innovation & Informatics

Year: 5

This module is optional

Traditional law and technology courses have looked to the regulation of new technologies, and therefore the restrictive power of law on the use and development of new technologies (in terms of privacy, intellectual property, security). This module looks at the other side of the picture; the ways in which new technological developments will influence the future development of law, legal service provision and access to justice.

Elements to include: (i) Legal Document Management (including electronic legal research, e-discovery, specialized legal databases), (ii) Legal Infrastructure (including: case management, legal lead generation, managing the firms legal business process and legal process outsourcing), Computational Law (including: legal expert systems, computable contracts, and unauthorized practice of law issues) (iv) online dispute resolution and its facilitation by expert systems (v) design thinking & visual law.

Entry conditions

We recognise a range of qualifications for admission to our courses. In addition to the specific entry conditions for this course you must also meet the University’s General Entrance Requirements.

A level

The A Level requirement for this course is BBB to include Irish.

Applied General Qualifications

QCF Pearson BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma / OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 Extended Diploma (2012 Suite)

Award profile of DDD. Candidates must fulfill the subject requirement for Irish (A level grade B or equivalent) via other qualifications.

RQF Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma/ OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 Extended Diploma(2016 Suite)

Award profile of DDM. Candidates must fulfill the subject requirement for Irish (A level grade B or equivalent) via other qualifications.

Irish Leaving Certificate

Overall Irish Leaving Certificate profile H3H3H3H3H3 to include Irish.

English Grade H6 (Higher Level) or above, or Grade O4 (Ordinary Level) or above, if not sitting at Higher Level, is required.

Scottish Highers

The Scottish Highers requirement for this course is BBBCC. Candidates must fulfill the subject requirement for Irish (A level grade B or equivalent) via other qualifications.

Scottish Advanced Highers

The Scottish Advanced Highers requirement for this course is CCC. Candidates must fulfill the subject requirement for Irish (A level grade B or equivalent) via other qualifications.

International Baccalaureate

Overall International Baccalaureate profile minimum 26 points (13 at higher level). Candidates must fulfill the subject requirement for Irish (A level grade B or equivalent) via other qualifications.

Access to Higher Education (HE)

Overall profile of 65% (120 credit Access Course) (NI Access Course). Candidates must fulfill the subject requirement for Irish (A level grade B or equivalent) via other qualifications.

Overall profile of 24 Distinctions and 21 Merits (60 credit Access Course) (GB Access Course). Candidates must fulfill the subject requirement for Irish (A level grade B or equivalent) via other qualifications.

GCSE

You must satisfy the General Entrance Requirements for admission to a first degree course and hold a GCSE pass in English Language at Grade C/grade 4 or above (or equivalent).

Level 2 Certificate in Essential Skills - Communication will be accepted as equivalent to GCSE English.

English Language Requirements

English language requirements for international applicants
The minimum requirement for this course is Academic IELTS 6.0 with no band score less than 5.5. Trinity ISE: Pass at level III also meets this requirement for Tier 4 visa purposes.

Ulster recognises a number of other English language tests and comparable IELTS equivalent scores.

Additional Entry Requirements

Acceptable alternative qualifications include:

Pass HND with overall Merit to include 75 level 5 credits at Distinction. Candidates must fulfill the subject requirement for Irish (A level grade B or equivalent) via other qualifications.

Pass HNC with overall Distinction to include 90 level 4 credits at Distinction. Candidates must fulfill the subject requirement for Irish (A level grade B or equivalent) via other qualifications.

You may also meet the course entry requirements with combinations of different qualifications to the same standard as recognised by the University (provided subject requirements as noted above are met).

Exemptions and transferability

The professional bodies that accredit LLB degrees place restrictions on the extent to which credit can be given for study undertaken on other courses and/or at other institutions. Provided that a candidate has met the standard entrance requirements for the course, consideration will be given (subject to these restrictions) to an application to transfer or for exemption from specific modules. No transfer or exemption is possible at level 6.

United States of America flagAdditional information for students from United States of America

Undergraduate

Each programme will have slightly different requirements, both in terms of overall points and certain subjects, so please check the relevant subject in the undergraduate on-line prospectus.

Normally Ulster University welcomes applications from students with:

Qualification
High School Diploma with overall GPA 3.0 and to include grades 3,3,3 in 3 AP subjects
High School Diploma with overall GPA 3.0 and to include 1000 out of 1600 in SAT
Associate Degree with GPA 3.0

English Language


Financial Information

In addition to the scholarships and bursaries open to all international students, US students may apply for Federal and Private US loans

Qualification
Level 12 English Lang in HSD

View more information for students from United States of America  

Careers & opportunities

Career options

Ulster graduates have gone on to study law at postgraduate level both at Ulster University and other institutions (e.g. Masters courses such as the LLM, or doctoral studies); others are now in practice as solicitors or barristers, having completed the Certificate in Professional Legal Studies. Others have pursued careers in related areas such as the business and finance sector, human resources, politics and the community sector.

Professional recognition

Bar Standards Board

Accredited by the Bar Standards Board for the purpose of a Qualifying Law Degree.

Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA)

The qualifying law degree is recognised by the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA) for the purposes of satisfying the academic stage of training.

Law Society of Northern Ireland (LSNI)

Recognised by the Law Society of Northern Ireland (LSNI) for the purpose of a Qualifying Law Degree.

Apply

Start dates

  • September 2020
  • August 2021

Fees and funding

Scholarships, awards and prizes

Prizes are sponsored by some of the foremost law firms in Northern Ireland, leading NGOs and legal publishing houses. The School believes that hard work and talent should be rewarded and, as such, the range of prizes on offer within the Law School provide an excellent means of facilitating student engagement with the legal professions and with community based organisations more broadly.

Additional mandatory costs

Students visit the Gaeltacht for a week in the Autumn and in the Spring each year. The cost of each course is circa £125 to cover travel, accommodation, food, activities, excursions and classes.

Tuition fees and costs associated with accommodation, travel (including car parking charges), and normal living are a part of university life.

Where a course has additional mandatory expenses we make every effort to highlight them. These may include residential visits, field trips, materials (e.g. art, design, engineering) inoculations, security checks, computer equipment, uniforms, professional memberships etc.

We aim to provide students with the learning materials needed to support their studies. Our libraries are a valuable resource with an extensive collection of books and journals as well as first-class facilities and IT equipment. Computer suites and free wifi is also available on each of the campuses.

There will be some additional costs to being a student which cannot be itemised and these will be different for each student. You may choose to purchase your own textbooks and course materials or prefer your own computer and software. Printing and binding may also be required. There are additional fees for graduation ceremonies, examination resits and library fines. Additional costs vary from course to course.

Students choosing a period of paid work placement or study abroad as part of their course should be aware that there may be additional travel and living costs as well as tuition fees.

Please contact the course team for more information.

Contact

Central Admissions Magee

T: 028 7167 5678

E: admissionsmg@ulster.ac.uk

Bridget Madden

T: 028 7167 5442

E: b.madden@ulster.ac.uk

International Admissions Office

T: +44 (0)28 7012 3333

E: internationaladmissions@ulster.ac.uk

Course Director: Mark Simpson

T: 028 7167 5033

E: m.simpson@ulster.ac.uk

For more information visit

Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

School of Law

Disclaimer

  1. The University endeavours to deliver courses and programmes of study in accordance with the description set out in this prospectus. The University’s prospectus is produced at the earliest possible date in order to provide maximum assistance to individuals considering applying for a course of study offered by the University. The University makes every effort to ensure that the information contained in the prospectus is accurate but it is possible that some changes will occur between the date of printing and the start of the academic year to which it relates. Please note that the University’s website is the most up-to-date source of information regarding courses and facilities and we strongly recommend that you always visit the website before making any commitments.
  2. Although reasonable steps are taken to provide the programmes and services described, the University cannot guarantee the provision of any course or facility and the University may make variations to the contents or methods of delivery of courses, discontinue, merge or combine courses and introduce new courses if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Such circumstances include (but are not limited to) industrial action, lack of demand, departure of key staff, changes in legislation or government policy including changes, if any, resulting from the UK departing the European Union, withdrawal or reduction of funding or other circumstances beyond the University’s reasonable control.
  3. If the University discontinues any courses, it will use its best endeavours to provide a suitable alternative course. In addition, courses may change during the course of study and in such circumstances the University will normally undertake a consultation process prior to any such changes being introduced and seek to ensure that no student is unreasonably prejudiced as a consequence of any such change.
  4. The University does not accept responsibility (other than through the negligence of the University, its staff or agents), for the consequences of any modification or cancellation of any course, or part of a course, offered by the University but will take into consideration the effects on individual students and seek to minimise the impact of such effects where reasonably practicable.
  5. The University cannot accept any liability for disruption to its provision of educational or other services caused by circumstances beyond its control, but the University will take all reasonable steps to minimise the resultant disruption to such services.