Irish with Education
BA (Hons)

2020/21 Full-time Undergraduate course

Award:

Bachelor of Arts with Honours

Faculty:

Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

School:

School of Arts and Humanities

Campus:

Magee campus

UCAS code:

Q5X3
The UCAS code for Ulster University is U20

Start date:

September 2020

Overview

Combine Irish with education to maximize your potential

Summary

We offer a comprehensive range of modules in Irish and Education which serve a broad and diverse body of students. Irish language and Educational provision and practice amongst staff and students reflects the University’s strong commitment to cultural and linguistic diversity within Northern Ireland and to the ever developing Irish Medium Sector.

Our Irish Language and Education programmes play a vital role in preserving, sustaining and celebrating Ireland’s Gaelic literary and linguistic heritage as well as serving the demands of the Irish language sector within the local job market.

At a personal level our programmes fulfil the needs of individuals who wish to acquire the necessary competence to fully participate in Irish language education as confident and independent users of the language.

Studying Irish in combination with Education is an excellent introduction to a future career in the general education sector. It will provide you with an introduction to the main concepts of educational theory and practice in NI, the UK and internationally.

Each semester students will take two modules in Irish and one in Education.


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About this course

About

This course will provide you with opportunities to learn from two disciplines, Irish and Education. As a result, you will have opportunities to develop a range of graduate qualities which will provide you with flexible and fluid skillsets for future study and employment.

This course is ideal for those who have gained via A-Level or Leaving Cert study a competent level in spoken and written Irish and who wish to pursue a full-time career within Education (either Irish Medium Education or teaching Irish in the English medium sector). This course would also be suitable for anyone wishing to work in the Irish Language sector who wishes to improve their language skills.

Associate awards

Diploma in International Academic Studies DIAS

Find out more about placement awards

Attendance

Three years (four years with DPP/DIAS option).

Start dates

  • September 2020

Teaching, Learning and Assessment

Knowledge and understanding are required through lectures, practical sessions, directed reading, case study work, fieldwork, seminars, tutorials, and primary and secondary data evaluation techniques. Modules are assessed by a combination of coursework and examinations or by coursework only. The assessment methods used in individual modules are specified in the module handbooks. Each module adopts its own assessment strategy and may include one or more of the following: essays; literature reviews; seminar oral presentations; seminar write-ups; class tests; research projects/dissertations and examinations.

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    Content

    The content for each course is summarised on the relevant course page, along with an overview of the modules that make up the course.

    Each course is approved by the University and meets the expectations of:

    Attendance and Independent Study

    As part of your course induction, you will be provided with details of the organisation and management of the course, including attendance and assessment requirements - usually in the form of a timetable. For full-time courses, the precise timetable for each semester is not confirmed until close to the start date and may be subject to some change in the early weeks as all courses settle into their planned patterns. For part-time courses which require attendance on particular days and times, an expectation of the days and periods of attendance will be included in the letter of offer. A course handbook is also made available.

    Courses comprise modules for which the notional effort involved is indicated by its credit rating. Each credit point represents 10 hours of student effort. Undergraduate courses typically contain 10- or 20-credit modules (more usually 20) and postgraduate course typically 15- or 30-credit modules.

    The normal study load expectation for an undergraduate full-time course of study in the standard academic year is 120 credit points. This amounts to around 36-42 hours of expected teaching and learning per week, inclusive of attendance requirements for lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical work, fieldwork or other scheduled classes, private study, and assessment. Part-time study load is the same as full-time pro-rata, with each credit point representing 10 hours of student effort.

    Postgraduate Master’s courses typically comprise 180 credits, taken in three semesters when studied full-time. A Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) comprises 60 credits and can usually be completed on a part-time basis in one year. A 120-credit Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) can usually be completed on a part-time basis in two years.

    Class contact times vary by course and type of module. Typically, for a module predominantly delivered through lectures you can expect at least 3 contact hours per week (lectures/seminars/tutorials). Laboratory classes often require a greater intensity of attendance in blocks. Some modules may combine lecture and laboratory. The precise model will depend on the course you apply for and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. Prospective students will be consulted about any significant changes.

    Assessment

    Assessment methods vary and are defined explicitly in each module. Assessment can be a combination of examination and coursework but may also be only one of these methods. Assessment is designed to assess your achievement of the module’s stated learning outcomes. You can expect to receive timely feedback on all coursework assessment. The precise assessment will depend on the module and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

    Coursework can take many forms, for example: essay, report, seminar paper, test, presentation, dissertation, design, artefacts, portfolio, journal, group work. The precise form and combination of assessment will depend on the course you apply for and the module. Details will be made available in advance through induction, the course handbook, the module specification and the assessment timetable. The details are subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

    Normally, a module will have 4 learning outcomes, and no more than 2 items of assessment. An item of assessment can comprise more than one task. The notional workload and the equivalence across types of assessment is standardised.

    Calculation of the Final Award

    The class of Honours awarded in Bachelor’s degrees is usually determined by calculation of an aggregate mark based on performance across the modules at Levels 5 and 6, (which correspond to the second and third year of full-time attendance).

    Level 6 modules contribute 70% of the aggregate mark and Level 5 contributes 30% to the calculation of the class of the award. Classification of integrated Master’s degrees with Honours include a Level 7 component. The calculation in this case is: 50% Level 7, 30% Level 6, 20% Level 5. At least half the Level 5 modules must be studied at the University for Level 5 to be included in the calculation of the class.

    All other qualifications have an overall grade determined by results in modules from the final level of study. In Master’s degrees of more than 200 credit points the final 120 points usually determine the overall grading.

Academic profile

The University employs over 1,000 suitably qualified and experienced academic staff - 59% have PhDs in their subject field and many have professional body recognition.

Courses are taught by staff who are Professors (25%), Readers, Senior Lecturers (18%) or Lecturers (57%).

We require most academic staff to be qualified to teach in higher education: 82% hold either Postgraduate Certificates in Higher Education Practice or higher. Most academic staff (81%) are accredited fellows of the Higher Education Academy (HEA) - the university sector professional body for teaching and learning. Many academic and technical staff hold other professional body designations related to their subject or scholarly practice.

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    The profiles of many academic staff can be found on the University’s departmental websites and give a detailed insight into the range of staffing and expertise. The precise staffing for a course will depend on the department(s) involved and the availability and management of staff. This is subject to change annually and is confirmed in the timetable issued at the start of the course.

    Occasionally, teaching may be supplemented by suitably qualified part-time staff (usually qualified researchers) and specialist guest lecturers. In these cases, all staff are inducted, mostly through our staff development programme ‘First Steps to Teaching’. In some cases, usually for provision in one of our out-centres, Recognised University Teachers are involved, supported by the University in suitable professional development for teaching.

    Figures correct for academic year 2019-2020.

Magee campus

Our vision is aligned to the strategic growth plan for the city and region.


Accommodation

Enjoy student life in one of Europe's most vibrant cities.

Find out more - information about accommodation  


Sports Facilities

Our facilities in Magee cater for many sports ranging from archery to volleyball, and are open to students and members of the public all year round.

Find out more - information about sport  


Student support

At Student Support we provide many services to help students through their time at Ulster University.

Find out more - information about student support  

Address

Ulster University
Northland Road
Derry~Londonderry
County Londonderry
BT48 7JL

T: 028 7012 3456

Modules

Here is a guide to the subjects studied on this course.

Courses are continually reviewed to take advantage of new teaching approaches and developments in research, industry and the professions. Please be aware that modules may change for your year of entry. The exact modules available and their order may vary depending on course updates, staff availability, timetabling and student demand. Please contact the course team for the most up to date module list.

Year one

Contemporary Educational Issues

Year: 1

This module provides an orientation to central educational concepts and values with the intention of providing a critical foundation for later reflection and learning.

Facilitating An Effective Learning Environment

Year: 1

This module encourages students to reflect on and assess a variety of approaches to teaching and learning in creating effective learning environments. The module offers a theoretical and practical approach to exploring the educational policies and practices that foster the key conditions for creating an effective learning environment.

An Ghaeilge Scríofa 1

Year: 1

This module covers the acquisition of written communicative skills, enabling the student to express themselves correctly in writing with confidence in a variety of everyday and academic contexts.

Labhairt na Gaeilge 1

Year: 1

This module takes students on the course from B2 (Vantage or upper intermediate):

- Can understand the main ideas of complex text on both concrete and abstract topics, including technical discussions in their field of specialization.
- Can interact with a degree of fluency and spontaneity that makes regular interaction with native speakers quite possible without strain for either party.
- Can produce clear, detailed text on a wide range of subjects and explain a viewpoint on a topical issue giving the advantages and disadvantages of various options.

to C1 (Effective operational proficiency or advanced level):

- Can understand a wide range of demanding, longer clauses, and recognize implicit meaning.
- Can express ideas fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions.
- Can use language flexibly and effectively for social, academic and professional purposes.
- Can produce clear, well-structured, detailed text on complex subjects, showing controlled use of organizational patterns, connectors and cohesive devices.

Léamhthuiscint na Gaeilge 1

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module aims to help students acquire skills and critical acumen in active reading that will be essential for successful progression through the degree program.

Léamhthuiscint na Gaeilge 2

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module aims to further develop students' skills and critical acumen in active reading, to bring about an awareness of dialect differences, and to expand knowledge of idiom in Irish.

Labhairt na Gaeilge 2

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module should consolidate the students' C1 level (Effective operational proficiency or advanced level) (CEFRL):

- Can understand a wide range of demanding, longer clauses, and recognize implicit meaning.
- Can express ideas fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions.
- Can use language flexibly and effectively for social, academic and professional purposes.
- Can produce clear, well-structured, detailed text on complex subjects, showing controlled use of organizational patterns, connectors and cohesive devices.

Stair Shóisialta is Liteartha na Gaeilge

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module examines the various political, socio-economic and cultural factors that precipitated the decline of Irish, its revival at the end of the nineteenth century and the emergence of a modern Irish literature in Irish

Year two

Industrial Educational Placement

Year: 2

The module offers students an industrial placement (usually in a school context) where they contribute to the development and delivery of the host intuition's project. Students develop their skills at communicating with both staff and learners, contribute to a learning exercise and where appropriate take a lead role in delivering learning to small groups. Students develop their reflective capabilities through a community of practice in the University's VLE. Presentational skills are also developed through the end of semester showcase event summarising the learning journey.

Béaloideas agus Staidéar Oidhreachta

Year: 2

The module provides an elucidation of important aspects of Irish folklore, oral tradition and literary heritage.

An Ghaeilge Scríofa 2

Year: 2

This module builds on an Ghaeilge Scríofa 1 and covers the acquisition of written communicative skills, enabling the student to express themselves correctly in writing with confidence in a variety of everyday and academic contexts.

Learning and Teaching with Technology

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module will equip students with the skills and understanding to collaborate online with other students, focusing on the application of ICT in teaching and learning at macro and micro levels. They will be required to assess their own personal style of learning and discuss the implications for online learning. They will also develop their research and information seeking skills, as well as their written and communication skills, enabling them to present assessed work to an appropriate standard.

Physical Health and Wellbeing

Year: 2

This module is optional

The module will introduce students to an appropriate range of theory connected to physical health and well-being in the context of children and young people's education. Students will have the opportunity to explore issues through practical based workshops where the emphasis will be on applying theory to practice. Assessment will comprise of one written assignment and one individual presentation.

Forbairt Theangeolaíoch na Gaeilge

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module examines various diachronic aspects of the Irish language.

Litríocht Ré na bPéindlithe

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module explores the literary tradition of 18th and 19th century Ireland. It examines both poetry and prose texts of various genres from this period, places them in their historical and cultural context and further develops methods of practical criticism.

Nuafhilíocht na Gaeilge

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module involves an in-depth study of modern Irish poetry from the beginning until the end of the twentieth century. The module aims equally to increase students' competence in the area of literary analysis and structured response.

An Ghaeilge Ghairmiúil

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module will allow students to enhance their understanding of the Irish language sector in a broader professional context whilst absorbing experiences gained within a work-based environment and/or scenario. This Level 5 Semester 2 module may also serve as a precursor to a placement inspired Research Project in year 3.

Year three

Inclusive Educational Practices

Year: 3

This module tackles issues of inequality and human rights abuses in education, those who have access to education and those who do not. It explores the myriad of ways education is only accessible to some and address how these barriers to education can be addressed. It explores the philosophical, historical and international contexts of these barriers and an approach to a more equal future for all.

Multicultural education and language learning

Year: 3

This module is about exploring learning and teaching in a world of increasing linguistic and cultural diversity. It focuses on practical and theoretical knowledge of supporting multicultural classrooms. It will develop initial knowledge and skills for effective support of bi/multilingual and English as an Additional Language (EAL) learners in a variety of educational settings. The module makes links between society, culture and identity; it explores theories about language acquisition, intercultural competence and bi/multilingual learning processes and evaluates school and pedagogic approaches to supporting bi/multilingual and EAL children.

Scéim Mhalartaithe. Teanga agus Litríocht na Gaeilge Thar Lear

Year: 3

This module is optional

The module provides an opportunity to undertake an extended period of study outside the UK. Students will develop an enhanced understanding of the academic discipline of Celtic Studies whilst generating educational and cultural networks.

Year four

Miontráchtas/Tionscadal

Year: 4

This module provides the student with the opportunity to select any topic from the area of Irish Studies/Irish Language and Literature on which he/she may undertake an individual research project

Canúineolaíocht na Gaeilge

Year: 4

This module examines various synchronic and diachronic aspects of the Irish language.

An Nua-Ghaeilge Luath agus an Ghaeilge Chlasaiceach

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module introduces students to Classical Irish and the Irish of the seventeenth century. It examines Bardic poetry, learned love poetry and key prose texts of the period.

Próslitríocht agus Drámaíocht na Gaeilge san Fhichiú hAois

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module analyses modern prose and drama in Irish, with a particular focus on the novel.

Léann agus Scileanna an Aistriúcháin

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module will introduce students to the study of grammar, syntax and phonology in Irish translation. Students will also study of the discourse of contemporary Irish translation and engage critically with key concepts in translation.

Oilteacht i Labhairt agus i Scríobh na Gaeilge

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module seeks to build on the language skills gained in all previous modules. Students will be given the chance to further develop their written and oral proficiency by completing a range of tasks. Detailed comprehension exercises in Irish will enable students to perfect their knowledge of Irish grammar. Extended debates and presentations will help students speak Irish with confidence and complete accuracy.

Standard entry conditions

We recognise a range of qualifications for admission to our courses. In addition to the specific entry conditions for this course you must also meet the University’s General Entrance Requirements.

A level

Grades BCC to include grade B in Irish.

Applicants may satisfy the requirement for an A level C grade by substituting a combination of alternative qualifications to the same standard as defined by the University.

Applied General Qualifications

*** To note that only qualifications defined as “Applied General” will be accepted for entry onto any undergraduate course at Ulster University.***

BTEC Awards

QCF Pearson BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma/ OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 Extended Diploma (2012 Suite)

Award profile of Distinction Distinction Merit

RQF Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma/ OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 Extended Diploma (2016 Suite)

Award profile of Distinction Merit Merit

QCF Pearson BTEC Level 3 Diploma/ OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 Diploma(2012 Suite)

Award profile of Distinction Merit plus A Level Grade B or award profile of Distinction Merit plus A Level Grade C

RQF Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Diploma/ OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 Diploma (2016 Suite)

Award profile of Distinction Merit plus A Level Grade C

QCF Pearson BTEC Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma / OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 Introductory Diploma (2012 Suite)

Award profile of Merit plus A Level Grades BC

RQF Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate/ OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 Extended Certificate (2016 Suite)

Award profile of Merit plus A Level Grades BC

Diploma, National Diploma and Subsidiary Diploma applicants may satisfy the requirement for an element of the offer grade profiles (equating to the final A-level grade stated in the standard 3A level offer profile - grade C) by substituting a combination of alternative qualifications to the same standard as defined by the University.

Candidates must fulfill the subject requirement for Irish (A level Grade B or equivalent) via other qualifications.

Irish Leaving Certificate

The Irish Leaving Certificate requirement for this course is grades

104 UCAS tariff points to include a minimum of four subjects at Higher Level to include grade H3 in Irish and one at Ordinary Level, including English at O4/H6 or above.

Scottish Highers

The Scottish Highers requirement for this course is to include BCCCC.

Candidates must fulfill the subject requirement for Irish (A level Grade B or equivalent) via other qualifications.

Applicants may satisfy the requirement for an element of the offer grade profiles (equating to the final A-level grade stated in the standard 3A level offer profile - Grade C ) by substituting a combination of alternative qualifications to the same standard as defined by the University.

Scottish Advanced Highers

The Scottish Advanced Highers requirement for this course is grades CDD.

Candidates must fulfill the subject requirement for Irish (A level Grade B or equivalent) via other qualifications.

Applicants may satisfy the requirement for an element of the offer grade profiles (equating to the final A-level grade stated in the standard 3A level offer profile - Grade C ) by substituting a combination of alternative qualifications to the same standard as defined by the University

International Baccalaureate

Overall International Baccalaureate profile minimum 24 points to include 12 at higher level. Candidates must fulfill the subject requirement for Irish (A level grade B or equivalent) via other qualifications.

Access to Higher Education (HE)

Access to Higher Education

For Access qualifications validated by Ulster University or QUB the entry requirement is:

An overall mark of 60% (120 credit Access Course) (NI Access course)

Candidates must fulfill the subject requirement for Irish (A level Grade B or equivalent) via other qualifications.

Overall profile of 12 credits at distinction, 30 credits at merit and 3 credits at pass (60 credit Access course) (GB Access course)

Candidates must fulfill the subject requirement for Irish (A level Grade B or equivalent) via other qualifications.

GCSE

For full-time study, you must satisfy the General Entrance Requirements for admission to a first degree course and hold a GCSE pass at Grade C/4 or above English Language.

Level 2 Certificate in Essential Skills - Communication will be accepted as equivalent to GCSE English.

English Language Requirements

English language requirements for international applicants
The minimum requirement for this course is Academic IELTS 6.0 with no band score less than 5.5. Trinity ISE: Pass at level III also meets this requirement for Tier 4 visa purposes.

Ulster recognises a number of other English language tests and comparable IELTS equivalent scores.

International Admissions Office

E: internationaladmissions@ulster.ac.uk

Additional Entry Requirements

Applicants holding a HND should achieve an overall Merit with distinctions in 30 Level 5 credits. Candidates must fulfill the subject requirement for Irish (A level grade B or equivalent) via other qualifications.

Applicants holding a HNC with overall Merit with distinctions in 60 Level 4 credits. Candidates must fulfill the subject requirement for Irish ( A level grade B or equivalent) via other qualifications.

Foundation Degree - an overall mark of 45% in Level 5 modules for Year 1 entry. Candidates must fulfill the subject requirement for Irish (A level grade B or equivalent) via other qualifications.

Applicants who hold the Ulster University Diploma in Irish Language will be considered for Year 1 entry.

The University will consider applications on the basis of experiential learning for those who do not hold the normal entry qualifications. Those applicants seeking entry with advanced standing, (eg. Transfer from another institution) will be considered on an individual basis .

Exemptions and transferability

Most students enter Year 1. However, if you can provide evidence of previous relevant study, you may be considered for entry to later years.

United States of America flagAdditional information for students from United States of America

Undergraduate

Each programme will have slightly different requirements, both in terms of overall points and certain subjects, so please check the relevant subject in the undergraduate on-line prospectus.

Normally Ulster University welcomes applications from students with:

Generally, for undergraduate courses for international applicants we require equivalent to A-Level CCC, for these courses the entry requirements will be one of the following:

Qualification

  • Qualification High School diploma with overall GPA 3.0 and 1000 out of 1600 in SAT (Post March 2016)
  • High School Diploma with overall GPA 3.0 and grades 3,3,3 in 3 AP subjects
  • High School Diploma with overall GPA 3.0 and 580 in 3 subject specific SAT tests
  • High School Diploma with overall GPA 3.0 and 26 in ACT
  • Associate Degree with GPA 3.0

Please note that some courses will have subject specific entry requirements, please check the relevant course entry requirements in the undergraduate on-line prospectus. If there is a subject specific requirement you will be required to get 580 in the Subject Specific SAT or Grade 3 in the Subject Specific AP test.

Some courses may also have additional entry criteria, such as a Skype interview, submission of a satisfactory portfolio, criminal record check or health check, please check the relevant course entry requirements in the undergraduate on-line prospectus.

For courses that require GCSE Mathematics Grade C, you will be required to successfully complete Grade 12 in High School Diploma Mathematics.

Some courses have higher entry requirements, please see list below;


BSc Hons Optometry

(A-level ABB to include 2 science subjects from Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics and Physics or equivalent)

Qualification

To include one of the following:

  • High School Diploma with overall GPA 3.0 and grades 5,4,4 in 3 AP subjects to include 2 science subjects
  • High School Diploma with overall GPA 3.0 and 1200 out of 1600 in SAT and 650 in 2 subject specific SAT, to include 2 science subjects
  • High School Diploma with overall GPA 3.0 and 28 in ACT and 2 AP subjects grades 4,4, to include 2 science subjects
  • Associate Degree with GPA 3.2 in an appropriate science subject

    In addition to both of the following:
  • Successful completion of Grade 12 High school Diploma English and Mathematics
  • A satisfactory criminal record check and health screening

MPharm Pharmacy

(A-Level BBB to include Chemistry and 1 science from Mathematics, Physics or Biology or equivalent)

Qualification

To include one of the following:

  • Qualification High School Diploma with overall GPA 3.0 and grades 4,4,4 in 3 AP subjects to include Chemistry and one other science
  • High School Diploma with overall GPA 3.0 and 1200 out of 1600 in SAT and 630 in 2 subject specific SAT to include Chemistry and one other science
  • High School Diploma with overall GPA 3.0 and 28 in ACT and 2 AP subjects Grades 4,4 to include Chemistry and 1 other science
  • Associate Degree with GPA 3.2 in an appropriate science subject

    In addition to both of the following:
  • Successful completion of Grade 12 High school Diploma English and Mathematics
  • A satisfactory criminal record check and health screening

BSc Hons Nursing (Adult) and BSc Hons Nursing (Mental Health)

(A-Level BBC or equivalent)

Qualification

To include one of the following:

  • High School Diploma with overall GPA 3.0 and grades 4,4,3 in 3 AP subjects
  • High School Diploma with overall GPA 3.0 and 1150 out of 1600 in SAT (Post March 2016)
  • High School Diploma with overall GPA 3.0 and 600 in 3 Subject Specific SAT tests
  • High School Diploma with overall GPA 3.0 and 28 in ACT
  • Associate Degree with GPA 3.1

    In addition to all of the following:
  • Successful completion of Grade 12 High school Diploma English and Mathematics
  • A satisfactory Skype interview
  • A satisfactory criminal record check and health screening

Financial Information

In addition to the scholarships and bursaries open to all international students, US students may apply for Federal and Private US loans

English Language

Qualification
Level 12 English Lang in HSD

View more information for students from United States of America  

Careers & opportunities

Career options

Students who study Irish with Education secure employment in several fields. Roles within the Irish language profession such as interpretation,community development and education are natural progression routes . Many graduates also pursue further study with formal educational roles such as a PGCE in Irish or Primary Education.

It is estimated that the number of students in Irish Medium Education will double in the next decade. A report published in June 2020 by leading language experts from the Council of Europe has stated that should be more education in Irish and there is a need to train more Irish-speaking teachers. This course answers that need.

Work placement / study abroad

Students will have the Option in Year Two of this course to study An Ghaeilge Ghairmiúil which will offer them an opportunity to gain valuable experience in an Educational setting.

You also have the option to undertake a one-year work placement (in Year 3) with an industry partner leading to the award of Diploma in Professional Practice (DPP). These work placements can be at home or abroad in an organization (company, local or central government or voluntary organization), and you will work under the supervision of an Industrial Supervisor, supported by the DPP Co-ordinator and an Academic Supervisor from within the University.

In addition to this, all students on the programme will take the module EDU308 Industrial Educational Placement. This will span one semester and provide you with industry experience (one day a week) whilst you study your other modules for that semester. This can be in a formal educational context such as a school, FE college or nursery setting. However, it can also be in industry with a training or educational role such as local government, NGOs or commerce.

Apply

Applications to full-time undergraduate degrees at Ulster are made through UCAS.

Start dates

  • September 2020

Contact

If you would like to contact us

E: study@ulster.ac.uk

International Admissions Office

E: internationaladmissions@ulster.ac.uk

For more information visit

Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

School of Arts and Humanities

Disclaimer

  1. The University endeavours to deliver courses and programmes of study in accordance with the description set out in this prospectus. The University’s prospectus is produced at the earliest possible date in order to provide maximum assistance to individuals considering applying for a course of study offered by the University. The University makes every effort to ensure that the information contained in the prospectus is accurate but it is possible that some changes will occur between the date of printing and the start of the academic year to which it relates. Please note that the University’s website is the most up-to-date source of information regarding courses and facilities and we strongly recommend that you always visit the website before making any commitments.
  2. Although reasonable steps are taken to provide the programmes and services described, the University cannot guarantee the provision of any course or facility and the University may make variations to the contents or methods of delivery of courses, discontinue, merge or combine courses and introduce new courses if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Such circumstances include (but are not limited to) industrial action, lack of demand, departure of key staff, changes in legislation or government policy including changes, if any, resulting from the UK departing the European Union, withdrawal or reduction of funding or other circumstances beyond the University’s reasonable control.
  3. If the University discontinues any courses, it will use its best endeavours to provide a suitable alternative course. In addition, courses may change during the course of study and in such circumstances the University will normally undertake a consultation process prior to any such changes being introduced and seek to ensure that no student is unreasonably prejudiced as a consequence of any such change.
  4. The University does not accept responsibility (other than through the negligence of the University, its staff or agents), for the consequences of any modification or cancellation of any course, or part of a course, offered by the University but will take into consideration the effects on individual students and seek to minimise the impact of such effects where reasonably practicable.
  5. The University cannot accept any liability for disruption to its provision of educational or other services caused by circumstances beyond its control, but the University will take all reasonable steps to minimise the resultant disruption to such services.