Skip to navigation Skip to content

Course search

History with Education
BA (Hons)

2020/21 Full-time Undergraduate course

Award:

Bachelor of Arts with Honours

Faculty:

Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

School:

School of Arts and Humanities

Campus:

Coleraine campus

UCAS code:

V1X3
The UCAS code for Ulster University is U20

Start date:

September 2020

With this degree you could become:


  • Teacher
  • Journalist
  • Civil and Public Service
  • Retail Management
  • University Lecturer
  • Banking and Finance
  • Law

Graduates from this course are now working for:


  • The BBC
  • Public Record Office of Northern Ireland
  • Education Authorities
  • First Trust Bank
  • Police Service of Northern Ireland
  • The National Trust
  • PwC
  • Belfast

Overview

Preparing for your future by understanding the past.

Summary

History at Ulster will stimulate your intellectual curiosity and challenge you to think critically about the world around you. You will develop a wide range of written, verbal, and analytical skills through the study of the historical processes that have shaped modern society. You will explore topics such as Film and the Vietnam War, Witchcraft and Magic, the Russian Revolution, United States’ Foreign Policy and many more.

We are the highest ranked History course in Northern Ireland and amongst the highest ranked in the UK for student satisfaction (National Student Survey 2018) meaning you will study with leading historians who are nationally recognised for the quality of their teaching.

We present History in unique and exciting ways. You will learn mainly in interactive workshops rather than in lectures and seminars. You will create podcasts and digital presentations, design websites, organise conferences and produce research portfolios.

Our recent graduates are in high demand from employers who recognise the fundamental skills of writing and presentation, research and time management, critical thinking and independence, that our History degree provides. If you have a passion for knowledge, are a critical thinker and want to better understand the past and its influence on the present and the future then this course is for you.

If you are interested in teaching as a career you may decide to add Education to your degree ‘mix’ at undergraduate level before applying for a Postgraduate Certificate in Education after you have completed your degree. Each Education module usually involves a two hour lecture plus a one hour seminar each week. In addition, you will have the opportunity for undertaking directed independent learning, which will enhance your potential for self-motivated study.


Sign up for course updates

Sign up to register an interest in the course.

About this course

About

This course addresses early modern, modern and contemporary history, exploring and analyzing many of the major developments that have shaped our current world. You will study European, British and Irish history, and also the history of the United States and parts of the Middle East. The course is particularly strong in international, social and comparative history and is taught by scholars with an excellent research record in these fields. Students can develop specialisms in areas like gender history, media history, public history and international diplomacy. It is designed to foster your enthusiasm for history and to provide a sound academic and practical basis for a variety of careers.

Associate awards

Diploma in International Academic Studies DIAS

Find out more about placement awards

Attendance

3 years (or 4 years if you take the option of a year abroad)

  • You will take 6 modules per year (3 per semester)
  • You will have approximately 3-4 hours per week of class time for each module (9-12 hours per week in total)
  • Typically, you will be in class 3 days per week
  • The remainder of your time will be devoted to independent study (200 hours per module)

Start dates

  • September 2020

Teaching, Learning and Assessment

  • Our course is taught and assessed in a more innovative and student-friendly way than most History courses in the UK and Ireland.
  • This is because our teaching takes place in 3-hour workshops as opposed to the traditional lecture/seminar model.
  • The workshops allow for greater flexibility and include short lectures, small and large group work, source analysis, and much more.
  • Each module takes place on a single day, allowing you to easily plan your work/life balance.
  • You will not have to sit any examinations in January as all our first semester modules are 100% coursework.
  • Our assessments include preparing research portfolios, creating vlogs and blogs, website design, conference planning and presentation, producing your own ‘History Research Project’.
  • Read more

    Content

    The content for each course is summarised on the relevant course page, along with an overview of the modules that make up the course.

    Each course is approved by the University and meets the expectations of:

    • the relevant generic national Qualification Descriptor
    • the applicable Subject Benchmark Statement
    • the requirements of any professional, regulatory, statutory and accrediting bodies.

    Attendance and Independent Study

    As part of your course induction, you will be provided with details of the organisation and management of the course, including attendance and assessment requirements - usually in the form of a timetable. For full-time courses, the precise timetable for each semester is not confirmed until close to the start date and may be subject to some change in the early weeks as all courses settle into their planned patterns. For part-time courses which require attendance on particular days and times, an expectation of the days and periods of attendance will be included in the letter of offer. A course handbook is also made available.

    Courses comprise modules for which the notional effort involved is indicated by its credit rating. Each credit point represents 10 hours of student effort. Undergraduate courses typically contain 10- or 20-credit modules (more usually 20) and postgraduate course typically 15- or 30-credit modules.

    The normal study load expectation for an undergraduate full-time course of study in the standard academic year is 120 credit points. This amounts to around 36-42 hours of expected teaching and learning per week, inclusive of attendance requirements for lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical work, fieldwork or other scheduled classes, private study, and assessment. Part-time study load is the same as full-time pro-rata, with each credit point representing 10 hours of student effort.

    Postgraduate Master’s courses typically comprise 180 credits, taken in three semesters when studied full-time. A Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) comprises 60 credits and can usually be completed on a part-time basis in one year. A 120-credit Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) can usually be completed on a part-time basis in two years.

    Class contact times vary by course and type of module. Typically, for a module predominantly delivered through lectures you can expect at least 3 contact hours per week (lectures/seminars/tutorials). Laboratory classes often require a greater intensity of attendance in blocks. Some modules may combine lecture and laboratory. The precise model will depend on the course you apply for and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. Prospective students will be consulted about any significant changes.

    Assessment

    Assessment methods vary and are defined explicitly in each module. Assessment can be a combination of examination and coursework but may also be only one of these methods. Assessment is designed to assess your achievement of the module’s stated learning outcomes. You can expect to receive timely feedback on all coursework assessment. The precise assessment will depend on the module and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

    Coursework can take many forms, for example: essay, report, seminar paper, test, presentation, dissertation, design, artefacts, portfolio, journal, group work. The precise form and combination of assessment will depend on the course you apply for and the module. Details will be made available in advance through induction, the course handbook, the module specification and the assessment timetable. The details are subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

    Normally, a module will have 4 learning outcomes, and no more than 2 items of assessment. An item of assessment can comprise more than one task. The notional workload and the equivalence across types of assessment is standardised.

    Calculation of the Final Award

    The class of Honours awarded in Bachelor’s degrees is usually determined by calculation of an aggregate mark based on performance across the modules at Levels 5 and 6, (which correspond to the second and third year of full-time attendance).

    Level 6 modules contribute 70% of the aggregate mark and Level 5 contributes 30% to the calculation of the class of the award. Classification of integrated Master’s degrees with Honours include a Level 7 component. The calculation in this case is: 50% Level 7, 30% Level 6, 20% Level 5. At least half the Level 5 modules must be studied at the University for Level 5 to be included in the calculation of the class.

    All other qualifications have an overall grade determined by results in modules from the final level of study. In Master’s degrees of more than 200 credit points the final 120 points usually determine the overall grading.

Academic profile

Our course is taught by leading historians. We publish books and articles, provide expert analysis for national and international media outlets, and are recognised for the quality of our teaching and research

Some recent examples include:

  • Dr Ian Miller was historical consultant on several BBC television programmes including The Victorian Pharmacy, Inside Michael Mosely, and Women and Power.
  • Dr Andrew Sneddon recently delivered three sold-out public lectures at the Black Box Theatre in Belfast on Irish Witchcraft.
  • Dr Emmet O’Connor was the historical consultant for Radio Foyle’s series on the Civil Rights movement.
  • Dr Kyle Hughes was Ulster University’s Teacher of the Year in 2018.
  • Dr Leanne McCormick won the University’s Distinguished Research Fellowship award in 2018.

The University employs over 1,000 suitably qualified and experienced academic staff - 59% have PhDs in their subject field and many have professional body recognition.

Courses are taught by staff who are Professors (25%), Readers, Senior Lecturers (18%) or Lecturers (57%).

We require most academic staff to be qualified to teach in higher education: 82% hold either Postgraduate Certificates in Higher Education Practice or higher. Most academic staff (81%) are accredited fellows of the Higher Education Academy (HEA) - the university sector professional body for teaching and learning. Many academic and technical staff hold other professional body designations related to their subject or scholarly practice.

  • Read more

    The profiles of many academic staff can be found on the University’s departmental websites and give a detailed insight into the range of staffing and expertise. The precise staffing for a course will depend on the department(s) involved and the availability and management of staff. This is subject to change annually and is confirmed in the timetable issued at the start of the course.

    Occasionally, teaching may be supplemented by suitably qualified part-time staff (usually qualified researchers) and specialist guest lecturers. In these cases, all staff are inducted, mostly through our staff development programme ‘First Steps to Teaching’. In some cases, usually for provision in one of our out-centres, Recognised University Teachers are involved, supported by the University in suitable professional development for teaching.

    Figures correct for academic year 2019-2020.

Coleraine campus

Our coastal and riverside campus with a primary academic focus on science and health.


Accommodation

A laid-back campus at the heart of a global tourist attraction.

Find out more  


Sports Facilities

Our Campus in Coleraine boasts a variety of indoor and outdoor facilities that are open all year round to students and members of the public.

Find out more  


Student support

At Student Support we provide many services to help students through their time at Ulster University.

Find out more  


Coleraine campus location info

  Find out more about our Coleraine campus

Address

Ulster University
Cromore Road
Coleraine
County Londonderry
BT52 1SA

T: 028 7012 3456

Modules

Here is a guide to the subjects studied on this course.

Courses are continually reviewed to take advantage of new teaching approaches and developments in research, industry and the professions. Please be aware that modules may change for your year of entry. The exact modules available and their order may vary depending on course updates, staff availability, timetabling and student demand. Please contact the course team for the most up to date module list.

Year one

An introduction to education

Year: 1

This module provides an orientation to central educational concepts and values with the intention of providing a critical foundation for later reflection and learning.

Educating Citizens in a Changing World

Year: 1

This module provides a thorough introduction to the nature and scope of education for citizenship, and its practice, in promoting democratic values in local and global contexts.

Making History: Skills for Historians

Year: 1

This module is designed to introduce students to the practical skills required for studying history at degree level and the methods and approaches that inform historical practice.

Defining America: Themes in American History, C17th -C20th

Year: 1

This module is optional

The module will illustrate and analyse the key themes and issues in American history from colonial times to the present day. Patterns and problems in the development of America will be discussed, and consideration of differing interpretations and source evaluations are implicit throughout the course. By the end of the module students should understand how the history of America has been shaped by the key events and debates that have taken place over the last four hundred years.

The Making of Modern Britain, 1750-1945

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module provides a comprehensive introduction to the history of modern Britain. It explores key themes such as industrialisation and urbanisation; reform and revolution; class and identity; religion, nationalism and unionism; war and empire. It utilises the latest historical scholarship and key primary sources delivered by research-active scholars via innovative lectures and seminars. The module brings to light the key events and historical processes which have shaped the Britain and Ireland of today.

'The Age of Extremes': International History 1914-2014

Year: 1

This module is optional

The purpose of this module is to provide Level 4 History students with an introduction to some of the main developments in world and international history from the First World War onwards. It is one of a number of broad, survey courses, designed to provide the basis for further, more detailed, study in subsequent years.

Disenchanted Land? Culture and Society in Early Modern Europe

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module will explore the structures of society in early-modern Europe, and the nature of early-modern social mentalities, daily social realities and material culture, cultural attitudes towards the natural world, varieties of religious belief and practice, and the supernatural in the early modern period: from notions in Heaven and Hell, to Angels, demons, witchcraft and magic. It will trace the effect on these beliefs and attitudes by the social, intellectual and cultural shifts associated with the Enlightenment.

Ireland, 1798-1998: Union and Disunion

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module examines key themes in Irish social and political history from the Act of Union to the Revolutionary period. Students will gain knowledge of important events such as the Famine, Land Wars, Easter Rising and War of Independence.

Year two

History in Practice: Preparing and Planning a History Research Project

Year: 2

This module combines theory, historical content, primary source analysis, and self-reflection to enable students to think effectively about the practice of history and the ways in which historical study can augment and enhance key transferrable and employability skills.

Introduction to the application of ICT in education

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module will equip students with the skills and understanding to collaborate online with other students, focusing on the application of ICT in teaching and learning at macro and micro levels. They will be required to assess their own personal style of learning and discuss the implications for online learning. They will also develop their research and information seeking skills, as well as their written and communication skills, enabling them to present assessed work to an appropriate standard.

Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS)

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module explores the main themes, practices and policies relating to effective Early Years Provision. The module will also investigate theory relating to child development, learning and emotional well-being. The importance of the partnership model between a child's home and their Early Years setting will also be considered. A key over-arching theme of the module is, therefore, the role of the effective practitioner. In the exploration of this content, students will be provided with opportunities to engage with practical examples of activities and resources appropriate to pre-school and Foundation Stage environments.

Advanced Tutoring in Schools

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module offers students a placement in a school where they contribute to a class project. They work closely with the class teacher in planning and helping to deliver the project and assessing its value for children and young people. The module helps to develop communication and team working skills and has potential value for all students not just intending teachers.

Working with Children & Young People with Special Educational Needs

Year: 2

This module is optional

At the core of this module is the aim to develop in the student a better awareness and understanding of SEN through study of the historical context of the subject, recent developments in legislation and policy and teaching and learning theories. Course participants will study the varying needs of different learners with a range of special educational needs, and the incumbent good practice that is required for their care and facilitation.

Exchange programme 1 - History Abroad

Year: 2

This module is optional

These modules provide an opportunity to undertake an extended period of study outside the UK and Republic of Ireland. They are required modules for all History students on an intercalary study abroad semester or year during second year. They are not open to non-study abroad students. Students will develop an enhanced understanding of the academic discipline of History whilst generating educational and cultural networks.

Exchange programme 3 - History Abroad

Year: 2

This module is optional

These modules provide an opportunity to undertake an extended period of study outside the UK and Republic of Ireland. They are required modules for all History students on an intercalary study abroad semester or year during second year. They are not open to non-study abroad students. Students will develop an enhanced understanding of the academic discipline of History whilst generating educational and cultural networks.

Exchange programme 4 - History Abroad

Year: 2

This module is optional

These modules provide an opportunity to undertake an extended period of study outside the UK and Republic of Ireland. They are required modules for all History students on an intercalary study abroad semester or year during second year. They are not open to non-study abroad students. Students will develop an enhanced understanding of the academic discipline of History whilst generating educational and cultural networks.

Exchange programme 5 - History Abroad

Year: 2

This module is optional

These modules provide an opportunity to undertake an extended period of study outside the UK and Republic of Ireland. They are required modules for all History students on an intercalary study abroad semester or year during second year. They are not open to non-study abroad students. Students will develop an enhanced understanding of the academic discipline of History whilst generating educational and cultural networks.

Exchange programme 6 - History Abroad

Year: 2

This module is optional

These modules provide an opportunity to undertake an extended period of study outside the UK and Republic of Ireland. They are required modules for all History students on an intercalary study abroad semester or year during second year. They are not open to non-study abroad students. Students will develop an enhanced understanding of the academic discipline of History whilst generating educational and cultural networks.

Exchange programme 2 - History Abroad

Year: 2

This module is optional

These modules provide an opportunity to undertake an extended period of study outside the UK and Republic of Ireland. They are required modules for all History students on an intercalary study abroad semester or year during second year. They are not open to non-study abroad students. Students will develop an enhanced understanding of the academic discipline of History whilst generating educational and cultural networks.

Family, Sexuality and the State 1850-1925

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module examines the role of the state in molding the history of the family and sexuality in Britain between 1860-1925. It looks at the forces which have influenced state policy as well as the impact on issues such as prostitution, homosexuality, gender roles and childhood.

War and Peace: the Ying and Yang of human history

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module is designed to help fill a still largely existent gap in human historiography by introducing students to the other side of the coin of human development: the human 'instinctive imperative' towards peace and through contrasting this with the roots of war, promote an understanding of the patterns in war and peace & advancement in the course of human history, with a particular focus on the post-1648, post-1815, post-World War One, post-World War Two and post-Cold War/post-9/11 periods.

The Great Powers and the Middle East since 1880

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module explores the impact of the West on the Middle East and its contribution to conflict in the region since the end of the 19th Century.

Ireland and the European Union, 1961-2016

Year: 2

This module is optional

Ireland and Europe examines the reasons for Ireland's application to join the EEC, the interests informing its European policy, and the impact of the EU on Irish politics, administration, and society. There is a specific emphasis on key policy areas such as foreign policy, neutrality, cross-border co-operation, regional cohesion, and the Common Agricultural Policy. The module also explains the functions of the main EU institutions and their relation to member states, and examines the politics of the integration process and its implications for member states.

Film and the Vietnam Conflict

Year: 2

This module is optional

The module explores the history, media, film and political culture in the context of America's involvement in the Vietnam War. The module explores major debates in the

historiography of the era. Film representations of the war are subject to scrutiny for what they reveal about American society, and how they depict the changing perspectives of the "history" of the conflict. The module also follows the way in which the war developed and the changing attitudes it provoked at home and abroad.

The Myth and Reality of Imperial Spain, 1492-1700

Year: 2

This module is optional

This course examines the rise to power of the Spanish Empire in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, and its subsequent decline from the seventeenth century onwards. The following issues will be emphasized: Spain's Empire building; the image of Spain in the European political discourse; the military, economic, and social crises of the seventeenth century; the Spanish Golden age in art and literature vis-à-vis the concept of decadence; the importance of honor and religion in all realms of society; the racial issue: from the convivencia to the Inquisition; the court of the Habsburgs; and the cultural impact of Spain in the early modern world. In addition, the course will consider the diverse populations constituting the Spanish World, stressing such social and cultural strains as those between: center (Castille), and periphery (for example, Catalonia, Naples, and The Netherlands); Christians and converted Jews/Muslims; Spanish Conquistadores and indigenous populations; and the various racial castes created in the Americas.

Death, Disease, and Medicine in Britain, 1800-1914

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module introduces students to key themes and topics on the history of death and illness in the long nineteenth century. Drawing from social, medical and Victorian history, students will explore themes such as murder in the Victorian city, ghosts, asylums, suicide, Victorian funerals and bodysnatching. Students will examine interdisciplinary sources including literature and art, as well as standard historical sources.

From New Jerusalem to New Labour: Culture, Society and Politics in Britain Since 1945

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module examines politics, culture and society in Britain from the end of the Second World War until the emergence of 'New Labour' in 1997. By exploring key themes such as defence and war, popular culture and the media, migration, race and ethnicity, the welfare state, sport, and the economy amongst others, it offers a comprehensive and innovative introduction to the postwar period and brings to light the key events and historical processes which shaped the Britain of today.

Revolutionary Russia, 1894-1939

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module examines Revolutionary Russia from the last Romanov ruler through to the establishment of Stalinism in the USSR. Key historiographical debates will be examined and assessed. The political, economic, and social and cultural aspects of this period will be covered.

Year three

Children, Young People and the Law

Year: 3

The module will attempt to provide a legal perspective for course participants in a variety of areas, ranging from the human and legal rights of pupils and young people to the development of clear health and safety policies.

Education, Conflict and Peacebuilding

Year: 3

This module is optional

This module focuses specifically on education and conflict amd will draw on concepts and methodologies from earlier modules. It is designed to sensitize students to the central role that education plays throughout the world, in areas of conflict. Students will not only clarify what is meant by education in emergency and refugee education, but will also analyze the development of conflict sensitive education systems. This module will also enable them to have a more accurate understanding of educational reconstruction and reconciliation.

TESOL: Theory and Practice

Year: 3

This module is optional

This module introduces the students to the theory of English language teaching and a range of practical skills for Teaching English to Speakers of other Languages. It provides opportunities for students to develop their skills and apply knowledge of education theory gained earlier in the programme. For example, it builds on Introduction to Education by examining how diverse people (different cultures, different ages) learn; it develops knowledge and skills learnt in the Tutoring in Schools module

History Abroad (DIAS)

Year: 3

This module is optional

This module provides students with an opportunity to undertake an extended period of study outside the UK and Republic of Ireland (one full academic year). It is a required module for all History students on an intercalary study abroad year between second (level 5) and final year (level 6). It is not open to non-study abroad students. Students will develop an enhanced understanding of the academic discipline of English whilst generating educational and cultural networks.

Year four

History Research Project

Year: 4

The history dissertation module revolves around the construction of a thesis. Students will identify a suitable topic or issue in history that they would like to study and to plan and execute that study. Students will be allocated a dissertation supervisor who will advise them on their work, both in terms of relevant source materials, approaches and form of the dissertation, but it will be the student's responsibility to identify and locate sources, to subject these to critical evaluation and then to structure and present their dissertation in such a way that you communicate clearly your aims, objectives, evidence and conclusions - and all to an agreed schedule of drafts.

'Changed, Changed Utterly': The Irish Revolution, 1913-1923.

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module utilises documentary, digital, and audio-visual sources to explore life in Ireland during the revolutionary years, 1913-1923. The period is brought to life through narratives of key events and the analysis of primary source material from the time.

Late Soviet Communism, 1953-1991

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module examines the attempts of the post-Stalin leadership to manage, reform, and improve the prosperity of Soviet domestic communism. The political, economic, and social and cultural policies of the three main general secretaries - Khrushchev, Brezhnev, and Gorbachev - will be examined and assessed critically.

United States Foreign Policy Since 1945

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module provides a comprehensive overview of US Foreign Policy since 1945. It considers the United States' place in the global political structure. It will examine defining moments in the history of US Foreign Policy, including the Cold War, Post-Cold War, and post-September 11th eras, analysing the administrations of Presidents from Harry S. Truman to Barack Obama.

Saints and Sinners: Women in Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Ireland

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module will use the study of women in Irish society from 1850-2000 to consider the role of women in areas such as politics, religion, culture, work and sexuality and how their role and experiences changed over the period. It will allow students to gain an alternative historical perspective on the major political and societal changes of the period. Though the use of oral history students will gain a personal understanding of female experience in the past.

Workers and radicalism in modern Ireland, 1800-1939

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module investigates the evolution of the working class in Ireland, and its interaction with capital, labour organization, society, and politics.

Royal Splendours: Politics, Culture, and Patronage in the Courts of Europe, 1450-1715

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module will trace the evolution of early modern courts from Burgundy in the 15th century to Louis XIV's Versailles in the 17th century. The following issues will be emphasized: the interaction of the ruler with the courtiers through the unique prism of the various mechanisms that constructed ceremonial and etiquette; the communication of the court with wider strata of the population via the magnificent spectacles and festivities that were organized to aggrandize such ruling houses as the Habsburgs, the Bourbons and the Tudors; the extravagance of royal patronage, and the use of such luxury products as: art, fashion, and finery. In geographical terms, most of the emphasis will be put on the Spanish and French courts, which presented the principal models of kingship and courtly culture that were emulated by the rest of the courts of Europe. In addition, it will examine how these models influenced some of the more interesting case-studies in the Italian peninsula, such as the Papal court, the court of the Medici, and the viceregal court of Naples.

Imperial Retreat: The Decline and Fall of the European Overseas Empires

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module will examine the historical process since 1945 whereby European colonial powers either withdrew or were driven from formal occupation of their overseas possessions. The module will not only examine various interpretations of imperial disengagement but will also provide an in-depth study of the actual mechanics of European decolonisation for particular territories in South and South East Asia, Africa and the Pacific. It also aims to enhance student skills in evaluating interpretations put forward by historians through allowing them to make a detailed study of one particular colonial possession.

America in the Depression, 1929-1941

Year: 4

This module is optional

This is an interdisciplinary study of one of the most significant events in the history of the United States since 1900, the Depression that began in 1929 and lasted until the USA entered the Second World War in 1941. This course will examine the turbulent years of the Great Depression and the New Deal. It will cover political, social, economic, and cultural aspects of the events and circumstances that led to the Depression, the election of FDR in 1933, and the formulation of the New Deal as national policy. It will then look at various aspects of New Deal policies and will assess the achievements and limitations of those policies.

The Post-War Body: Medicine and Society in Britain and America, c.1945-90

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module examines the dramatic changes in experiences of health and illness that occurred in the twentieth century. Focusing on Britain and America, it explores how our attitudes to matters such as sex, death, eating, disability and mental health were revolutionized in the twentieth century. The module also looks at ethical problems issues such as Cold War human experimentation. Students will engage with broader themes such as class, gender and race relations.

Witchcraft and magic in early modern Europe and Colonial New England, c.1550-1780

Year: 4

This module is optional

The early modern period is often seen as the era of the European 'witch-panic', which saw around 40,000 people executed for the crime of witchcraft. This module will examine the many facets of the witchcraft experience in Europe and New England using a variety of contemporary sources: from images and printed books and pamphlets, to court records and private correspondence. It will examine patterns of witchcraft accusation and prosecution, the intellectual context of witchcraft beliefs, the connection between witchcraft and women, the decline in educated belief, and the continuation of popular notions and traditions. Early modern witchcraft will also be located in its wider magical context by exploring both popular magic. Developments in witchcraft and magic in the early modern period will also be linked to wider societal, cultural and religious changes.

From Prison to Nation: Australia, 1788-1900

Year: 4

This module is optional

From the first encounters between Indigenous peoples and Europeans, this module introduces some of the major themes, people, and debates in Australian colonial history up to the creation of the Australian Commonwealth on 1 January 1901. Topics include exploration, convict society, immigration, racism, gender hierarchies, class consciousness, urban development, environmental exploitation, and political uses (and abuses) of history.

Entry conditions

We recognise a range of qualifications for admission to our courses. In addition to the specific entry conditions for this course you must also meet the University’s General Entrance Requirements.

A level

Grades BBC- BCC.

Applicants may satisfy the requirement for the final A level grade C by substituting a combination of alternative qualifications to the same standard as defined by the University.

Preference may be given to candidates with an A level Grade B in History.

Applied General Qualifications

*** To note that only qualifications defined as “Applied General” will be accepted for entry onto any undergraduate course at Ulster University.***

BTEC Awards

QCF Pearson BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma/ OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 Extended Diploma (2012 Suite)

Award profile of DDM

RQF Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma/ OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 Extended Diploma (2016 Suite)

Award profile of DMM

QCF Pearson BTEC Level 3 Diploma/ OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 Diploma(2012 Suite)

Award profile of Distinction Merit plus A Level Grade B or award profile of Distinction Merit plus A Level Grade C

RQF Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Diploma/ OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 Diploma (2016 Suite)

Award profile of Distinction Merit plus A Level Grade C

QCF Pearson BTEC Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma / OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 Introductory Diploma (2012 Suite)

Award profile of Merit plus A Level Grades BC

RQF Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate/ OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 Extended Certificate (2016 Suite)

Award profile of Merit plus A Level Grades BC

Diploma, National Diploma and Subsidiary Diploma applicants may satisfy the requirement for an element of the offer grade profiles (equating to the final A-level grade stated in the standard 3A level offer profile - Grade C) by substituting a combination of alternative qualifications to the same standard as defined by the University.

Irish Leaving Certificate

The Irish Leaving Certificate requirement for this course is grades

H3,H3,H3,H3,H4 – H3,H3,H3,H4,H4 at higher level

Applicants are also required to have Higher Level English Grade H6 or above OR Ordinary Level at grade 04 or above.

Preference may be given to candidates with a H3 at higher level in History.

Scottish Highers

The Scottish Highers requirement for this course is grades

BBCCC - BCCCC

Applicants may satisfy the requirement for an element of the offer grade profiles (equating to the final A-level grade stated in the standard 3A level offer profile - Grade C) by substituting a combination of alternative qualifications to the same standard as defined by the University.

Preference may be given to candidates with Grade B in History.

Scottish Advanced Highers

The Scottish Advanced Highers requirement for this course is grades

CCD - CDD

Applicants may satisfy the requirement for an element of the offer grade profiles (equating to the final A-level grade stated in the standard 3A level offer profile - Grade C) by substituting a combination of alternative qualifications to the same standard as defined by the University.

Preference may be given to candidates with Grade C in History.

International Baccalaureate

Overall International Baccalaureate profile is minimum.

25 points (including 12 at higher level) - 24 points (including 12 at higher level.

Access to Higher Education (HE)

Overall profile of 65-60% (120 credit Access Course) (NI Access course)

Overall profile of 15 credits at Distinction, 30 credits at Merit – 12 credits at Distinction, 30 credits at Merit and 3 credits at Pass (60 credit Access course) (GB Access course)

GCSE

For full-time study, you must satisfy the General Entrance Requirements for admission to a first degree course and hold a GCSE pass at Grade C/4 or above English Language.

Level 2 Certificate in Essential Skills - Communication will be accepted as equivalent to GCSE English.

English Language Requirements

English language requirements for international applicants
The minimum requirement for this course is Academic IELTS 6.0 with no band score less than 5.5. Trinity ISE: Pass at level III also meets this requirement for Tier 4 visa purposes.

Ulster recognises a number of other English language tests and comparable IELTS equivalent scores.

Additional Entry Requirements

HND

Applicants holding a HND should achieve an overall merit for entry to Year 1. Those applicants holding a subject-related HND with an overall merit may be considered for entry to Year 2.

HNC

Applicants holding a HNC should achieve an overall merit for entry to Year 1 only.

Foundation Degree

Applicants holding a Foundation Degree should achieve an overall average of 50-45% in level 5 modules for Year 1 entry. Those applicants holding a subject-related Foundation Degree may be considered for entry to Year 2.

APEL (Accreditation of Prior Experiential Learning)

The University will consider applications on the basis of experiential learning for those who do not hold the normal entry qualifications.

Transfer from degree level study at other institutions

Those applicants seeking entry with advanced standing, (eg. Transfer from another institution or year 2 entry) will be considered on an individual basis.

Exemptions and transferability

  • You may be able to transfer from another institution should you satisfy our entry requirements.
  • It is possible to transfer between our single honours History course and our History with combination courses at the end of your first year.

United States of America flagAdditional information for students from United States of America

Undergraduate

Each programme will have slightly different requirements, both in terms of overall points and certain subjects, so please check the relevant subject in the undergraduate on-line prospectus.

Normally Ulster University welcomes applications from students with:

Qualification
High School Diploma with overall GPA 3.0 and to include grades 3,3,3 in 3 AP subjects
High School Diploma with overall GPA 3.0 and to include 1000 out of 1600 in SAT
Associate Degree with GPA 3.0

English Language


Financial Information

In addition to the scholarships and bursaries open to all international students, US students may apply for Federal and Private US loans

Qualification
Level 12 English Lang in HSD

View more information for students from United States of America  

Careers & opportunities

Graduate employers

Graduates from this course are now working for:

  • The BBC
  • Public Record Office of Northern Ireland
  • Education Authorities
  • First Trust Bank
  • Police Service of Northern Ireland
  • The National Trust
  • PwC
  • Belfast

Job roles

With this degree you could become:

  • Teacher
  • Journalist
  • Civil and Public Service
  • Retail Management
  • University Lecturer
  • Banking and Finance
  • Law

Career options

  • History at Ulster does not confine you to one career path. Our course develops talents which are transferrable across a variety of professions and industries.
  • You will enhance your general knowledge and hone your writing and digital presentation skills, learn how to research and assess material, and present evidence-based, fact-checked arguments.
  • You will develop excellent time management skills, learn how to think critically and reach logical conclusions. You will be able to work independently and as part of a team.
  • These skills are valued by employers in all businesses and professions.
  • Our recent graduates are working in media, education, civil service, retail, banking and finance, the heritage sector, and in law.
  • Others have gone on to postgraduate study: some with our own Masters in History programme https://www.ulster.ac.uk/courses/201920/history-19755and others in law, journalism, conflict studies, teaching, and politics at numerous universities including King’s College, London; University College, London; University of Liverpool; University of Pennsylvania.

Work placement / study abroad

  • We have partnerships with universities throughout North America, Europe and Asia and you can choose to study abroad for one semester or for a year. Some of our current students have studied in New York, Hong Kong, Singapore, and many more. See: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/goglobal
  • We provide full careers support, from CV preparation, to interview skills, and help with applications to all graduate internships, apprenticeships and full-time positions. You can continue to make use of our extensive careers support services for up to three years after you graduate. For more information: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/campus-life/careers
  • You will be eligible for the university’s ‘Tutoring in Schools’ programme, gaining valuable classroom experience should you wish to pursue a career in education. See: http://addl.ulster.ac.uk/tis/

Apply

Applications to full-time undergraduate degrees at Ulster are made through UCAS.

Start dates

  • September 2020

Fees and funding

Fees (per year)

Important notice - fees information

The tuition fees stated are for Academic Year 2020/21 for NI/ EU excluding GB*

*GB applies to a student who normally lives in England, Wales, Scotland and the Islands (Channel Islands and the Isle of Man).

Academic Year 2020/21 International and GB fees are not currently available. Further fees will be published when approved.

Correct at the time of publishing. All fees are subject to an annual increase. Terms and conditions apply. Additional mandatory costs are highlighted where they are known in advance. There are other costs associated with university study.

Northern Ireland & EU: £4,395

Scholarships, awards and prizes

We offer prizes to award our highest achieving students across all three years of study. As examples,

  • the ‘J.L. McCracken Prize in History’ recognises the best performance in first year;
  • the ‘Jackie McKinney Memorial Prize’ awards the best overall performance in a combined History and English degree;
  • and the ‘Honourable Irish Society’s History Prize’ awards the student with the best overall performance in final year.
  • The recipients are presented with trophies and cash prizes at a special awards ceremony each year.

Additional mandatory costs

Education as a minor is a ‘regulated and/or care position’ within the meaning of the Protection of Children and Vulnerable Adults (NI) Order 2003 (POCVA) and the Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups (NI) Order 2007. Depending on the modules you select you may have access to children and/or vulnerable adults and therefore you will be subject to a criminal history check costing approximately £33.

Tuition fees and costs associated with accommodation, travel (including car parking charges), and normal living are a part of university life.

Where a course has additional mandatory expenses we make every effort to highlight them. These may include residential visits, field trips, materials (e.g. art, design, engineering) inoculations, security checks, computer equipment, uniforms, professional memberships etc.

We aim to provide students with the learning materials needed to support their studies. Our libraries are a valuable resource with an extensive collection of books and journals as well as first-class facilities and IT equipment. Computer suites and free wifi is also available on each of the campuses.

There will be some additional costs to being a student which cannot be itemised and these will be different for each student. You may choose to purchase your own textbooks and course materials or prefer your own computer and software. Printing and binding may also be required. There are additional fees for graduation ceremonies, examination resits and library fines. Additional costs vary from course to course.

Students choosing a period of paid work placement or study abroad as part of their course should be aware that there may be additional travel and living costs as well as tuition fees.

Please contact the course team for more information.

Contact

Course Director: Dr Kyle Hughes

T: +44 (0)28 7012 3551

E: k.hughes1@ulster.ac.uk

Admissions Office - Claire Tinkler or Karen Gibson

T: +44 (0)28 7012 3895 or +44 (0)28 701 24353

E: cm.tinkler@ulster.ac.ukor ki.gibson@ulster.ac.uk

International Admissions Office

E: internationaladmissions@ulster.ac.uk

For more information visit

Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

School of Arts and Humanities

Disclaimer

  1. The University endeavours to deliver courses and programmes of study in accordance with the description set out in this prospectus. The University’s prospectus is produced at the earliest possible date in order to provide maximum assistance to individuals considering applying for a course of study offered by the University. The University makes every effort to ensure that the information contained in the prospectus is accurate but it is possible that some changes will occur between the date of printing and the start of the academic year to which it relates. Please note that the University’s website is the most up-to-date source of information regarding courses and facilities and we strongly recommend that you always visit the website before making any commitments.
  2. Although reasonable steps are taken to provide the programmes and services described, the University cannot guarantee the provision of any course or facility and the University may make variations to the contents or methods of delivery of courses, discontinue, merge or combine courses and introduce new courses if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Such circumstances include (but are not limited to) industrial action, lack of demand, departure of key staff, changes in legislation or government policy including changes, if any, resulting from the UK departing the European Union, withdrawal or reduction of funding or other circumstances beyond the University’s reasonable control.
  3. If the University discontinues any courses, it will use its best endeavours to provide a suitable alternative course. In addition, courses may change during the course of study and in such circumstances the University will normally undertake a consultation process prior to any such changes being introduced and seek to ensure that no student is unreasonably prejudiced as a consequence of any such change.
  4. The University does not accept responsibility (other than through the negligence of the University, its staff or agents), for the consequences of any modification or cancellation of any course, or part of a course, offered by the University but will take into consideration the effects on individual students and seek to minimise the impact of such effects where reasonably practicable.
  5. The University cannot accept any liability for disruption to its provision of educational or other services caused by circumstances beyond its control, but the University will take all reasonable steps to minimise the resultant disruption to such services.

Testimonials

Robert Hunter (year 2 History)

‘I am really enjoying studying History at Ulster. It offers lots of interesting modules that cover a wide variety of eras and cultures, taught by helpful expert staff. It has taught me transferable skills such as how to analyse, interpret and present information that will be valuable when it comes to seeking employment after graduation. History at Ulster has also given me access to amazing travel opportunities. In the summer of 2019 I was awarded a bursary to work in the “In Flanders Fields Museum” in Ypres, Belgium for three weeks where I helped to digitise the records of Irish soldiers who died during the First World War’.

Karolina Stonkute (year 3 History)

‘During my three years on the History course at Ulster, I have never felt unsupported. The History lecturers have continuously provided me with help whether it was academic or personal. They strive to push their students to achieve grades that they believe best represents their skills. I would not have the experience nor the confidence to enter the next chapter of my career without them.’

Orin McIvor (year 3 History)

‘At the end of my second year studying History at Ulster in 2018 I applied for the ‘study abroad’ programme and spent a year at university in America. I had an incredible time. It was truly a life changing experience that boosted my self-esteem and confidence. It was amazing being able to experience different cultures and to meet people that I would become friends with that I would have had no opportunity to do so before. I miss the experience a little more every day and still catch up with the friends I made. It was an experience that I feel anybody with even a hint of interest in studying abroad should go for as they will not regret it’.

Jordan Bertuccelli (graduated 2017, now a PhD student in History)

‘Studying History at Ulster was one of the most rewarding experiences of my life. The staff go above and beyond to ensure you have the best experience possible. The modules on offer are diverse and allow for a wide-reaching examination of historical concepts and themes, many of which I had never had the opportunity to study before going to university. While that may seem like a daunting prospect, it was actually a relief as finally it felt like I could study the history that I had an interest in and not just what a school textbook dictated. The freedom and range of topics meant that every day was a learning day and I can safely say that I enjoyed every minute of every module.

History at Ulster is about more than just gaining a degree. It encourages you to reach goals that you maybe thought were unattainable. The lecturers are exceptional, and they often provide opportunities for students to do something a little different, all they ask in return is that you challenge yourself to do them. I served as a course representative and always felt that staff valued my comments and suggestions. I was encouraged to come out of my shell and I have gained vital skills and confidence, including establishing a History advice centre in the university, organising conferences, and creating websites and exhibitions. I went on to complete a Masters and am now in my first year of a PhD. I never would have thought this possible when I first started studying here.

If you choose History at Ulster you will be embarking on a journey of exploration and discovery, one that is fulfilling, challenging and provides great rewards. Whether you are new to History, an avid historian or simply someone who has an interest in History, this is the course for you!’

Sorcha Belallia (part-time History)

‘I am in my fifth year at Ulster and studying History here has been an enjoyable experience due to the wide variety of modules on offer. The part time study option has provided me a great degree of flexibility in completing the course. I still study the same modules and receive the same degree as the full-time students and I have access to the same facilities and opportunities. I am a course representative and I have been on the organising committee of the final-year conference.’