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Environmental Science (with Optional Placement year)
BSc (Hons)

2020/21 Full-time Undergraduate course

Award:

Bachelor of Science with Honours

Faculty:

Faculty of Life and Health Sciences

School:

School of Geography and Environmental Sciences

Campus:

Coleraine campus

UCAS code:

F900
The UCAS code for Ulster University is U20

Start date:

September 2020

With this degree you could become:


  • Scientific Officer
  • Waste Water Inspector
  • Environmental Consultant
  • Mapping and Charting Officer
  • Hydrographic Surveyor
  • Soil Scientist
  • Ecologist

Graduates from this course are now working for:


  • AgriFood & Biosciences Institute (AFBI)
  • DARD - Department of Agriculture and Rural Development
  • White
  • Young & Green
  • Spill Assist
  • Terra Quest Limited
  • Loughs Agency
  • Fugro

Overview

Do you want to make a difference?

IES Accredited

Accredited by the Institution of Environmental Sciences (IES) for the purpose of eligibility to apply for associate membership.

Summary

BSc Environmental Science

Taking care of our planet for future generations is one of our most important responsibilities.

By studying Environmental Science at Ulster you will gain the knowledge and skills to address issues such as climate change, conserving animal and plant diversity, environmental impacts of development and the management of water and air pollution.

If you enjoy science or geography and have an interest in environmental issues, this course is for you.

Why do Environmental Science with us?

  • We have had 100% satisfaction from students in the National Student Survey for six years (2014-2019).
  • If you are interested in the study of the ocean, you can take optional marine science modules as a pathway through the degree.
  • 100% of our students get the option to complete a placement in industry or study abroad (i.e. we offer an optional placement year).
  • 92% of our graduates are employed or in further study within 6 months of graduating (DLHE, 2018).
  • Our course is accredited by the Institution of Environmental Sciences.
  • We are ranked 12th out of 66 UK universities for Geography and Environmental Studies (The Guardian 2019)
  • We are located on the Coleraine Campus, minutes away from the spectacular Causeway Coast with lots of natural laboratories to explore including the open sea, estuaries, rivers, lakes, woodlands and uplands.

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About this course

About

In Year 1 students start with a residential field school and then study modules related to environmental sustainability, understanding environmental systems, climate change and data analysis skills relevant to the environmental scientist.

In Year 2 students study geographic information systems and remote sensing, environmental planning, land and water ecology, atmospheric processes, freshwater systems and pollution, coastal and marine systems (for the marine science pathway), enterprise, business and employability and attend a residential overseas field school (usually in Portugal).

In the final year students continue geographic information systems and remote sensing and other modules focus on environmental change, environmental challenges and management, applications of water science and pollution remediation, physical and biological oceanography (for the marine science pathway) and a research project on a specific environmental problem.

Students also have the option to extend their academic studies by electing to study abroad for a year or by working in industry/business. This additional year spent away from Ulster University is taken in the third year.

UCAS Code F900: BSc Hons Environmental Science (3 years)

UCAS Code F901: BSc Hons Environmental Science with DPP/DIAS (4 years, including placement)

Study abroad options

You will have the opportunity to study for a year at a university abroad. Options include a range of European countries, North America and partner universities in Australia and French Polynesia. On successful completion you will be awarded an additional diploma (DIAS).

Industrial placements

The industrial placement scheme gives you the opportunity to work for 10 months within an organization developing skills and applying knowledge. On successful completion you will be awarded an additional diploma (DPP).

Associate awards

Diploma in Professional Practice DPP

Diploma in International Academic Studies DIAS

Find out more about placement awards

Attendance

You are on campus five days per week. The contact time average is 16 hours per week, 24 hours per week average independent study including academic assessment.

Start dates

  • September 2020

Teaching, Learning and Assessment

Teaching is through a range of methods such as lectures, seminars and tutorials but with an emphasis on practical and field work. Students are assessed through a combination of coursework and examinations. Each module adopts its own assessment strategy and may include one or more of the following: essays; literature reviews/critical reviews; laboratory reports; fieldwork reports; field notebooks; individual and group project reports; problem analysis; research projects/dissertations; individual and group oral and poster presentations; class tests; web-site design and examinations.

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    Content

    The content for each course is summarised on the relevant course page, along with an overview of the modules that make up the course.

    Each course is approved by the University and meets the expectations of:

    • the relevant generic national Qualification Descriptor
    • the applicable Subject Benchmark Statement
    • the requirements of any professional, regulatory, statutory and accrediting bodies.

    Attendance and Independent Study

    As part of your course induction, you will be provided with details of the organisation and management of the course, including attendance and assessment requirements - usually in the form of a timetable. For full-time courses, the precise timetable for each semester is not confirmed until close to the start date and may be subject to some change in the early weeks as all courses settle into their planned patterns. For part-time courses which require attendance on particular days and times, an expectation of the days and periods of attendance will be included in the letter of offer. A course handbook is also made available.

    Courses comprise modules for which the notional effort involved is indicated by its credit rating. Each credit point represents 10 hours of student effort. Undergraduate courses typically contain 10- or 20-credit modules (more usually 20) and postgraduate course typically 15- or 30-credit modules.

    The normal study load expectation for an undergraduate full-time course of study in the standard academic year is 120 credit points. This amounts to around 36-42 hours of expected teaching and learning per week, inclusive of attendance requirements for lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical work, fieldwork or other scheduled classes, private study, and assessment. Part-time study load is the same as full-time pro-rata, with each credit point representing 10 hours of student effort.

    Postgraduate Master’s courses typically comprise 180 credits, taken in three semesters when studied full-time. A Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) comprises 60 credits and can usually be completed on a part-time basis in one year. A 120-credit Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) can usually be completed on a part-time basis in two years.

    Class contact times vary by course and type of module. Typically, for a module predominantly delivered through lectures you can expect at least 3 contact hours per week (lectures/seminars/tutorials). Laboratory classes often require a greater intensity of attendance in blocks. Some modules may combine lecture and laboratory. The precise model will depend on the course you apply for and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. Prospective students will be consulted about any significant changes.

    Assessment

    Assessment methods vary and are defined explicitly in each module. Assessment can be a combination of examination and coursework but may also be only one of these methods. Assessment is designed to assess your achievement of the module’s stated learning outcomes. You can expect to receive timely feedback on all coursework assessment. The precise assessment will depend on the module and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

    Coursework can take many forms, for example: essay, report, seminar paper, test, presentation, dissertation, design, artefacts, portfolio, journal, group work. The precise form and combination of assessment will depend on the course you apply for and the module. Details will be made available in advance through induction, the course handbook, the module specification and the assessment timetable. The details are subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

    Normally, a module will have 4 learning outcomes, and no more than 2 items of assessment. An item of assessment can comprise more than one task. The notional workload and the equivalence across types of assessment is standardised.

    Calculation of the Final Award

    The class of Honours awarded in Bachelor’s degrees is usually determined by calculation of an aggregate mark based on performance across the modules at Levels 5 and 6, (which correspond to the second and third year of full-time attendance).

    Level 6 modules contribute 70% of the aggregate mark and Level 5 contributes 30% to the calculation of the class of the award. Classification of integrated Master’s degrees with Honours include a Level 7 component. The calculation in this case is: 50% Level 7, 30% Level 6, 20% Level 5. At least half the Level 5 modules must be studied at the University for Level 5 to be included in the calculation of the class.

    All other qualifications have an overall grade determined by results in modules from the final level of study. In Master’s degrees of more than 200 credit points the final 120 points usually determine the overall grading.

Academic profile

The University employs over 1,000 suitably qualified and experienced academic staff - 59% have PhDs in their subject field and many have professional body recognition.

Courses are taught by staff who are Professors (25%), Readers, Senior Lecturers (18%) or Lecturers (57%).

We require most academic staff to be qualified to teach in higher education: 82% hold either Postgraduate Certificates in Higher Education Practice or higher. Most academic staff (81%) are accredited fellows of the Higher Education Academy (HEA) - the university sector professional body for teaching and learning. Many academic and technical staff hold other professional body designations related to their subject or scholarly practice.

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    The profiles of many academic staff can be found on the University’s departmental websites and give a detailed insight into the range of staffing and expertise. The precise staffing for a course will depend on the department(s) involved and the availability and management of staff. This is subject to change annually and is confirmed in the timetable issued at the start of the course.

    Occasionally, teaching may be supplemented by suitably qualified part-time staff (usually qualified researchers) and specialist guest lecturers. In these cases, all staff are inducted, mostly through our staff development programme ‘First Steps to Teaching’. In some cases, usually for provision in one of our out-centres, Recognised University Teachers are involved, supported by the University in suitable professional development for teaching.

    Figures correct for academic year 2019-2020.

Coleraine campus

Our coastal and riverside campus with a primary academic focus on science and health.


Accommodation

A laid-back campus at the heart of a global tourist attraction.

Find out more  


Sports Facilities

Our Campus in Coleraine boasts a variety of indoor and outdoor facilities that are open all year round to students and members of the public.

Find out more  


Student support

At Student Support we provide many services to help students through their time at Ulster University.

Find out more  


Coleraine campus location info

  Find out more about our Coleraine campus

Address

Ulster University
Cromore Road
Coleraine
County Londonderry
BT52 1SA

T: 028 7012 3456

Modules

Here is a guide to the subjects studied on this course.

Courses are continually reviewed to take advantage of new teaching approaches and developments in research, industry and the professions. Please be aware that modules may change for your year of entry. The exact modules available and their order may vary depending on course updates, staff availability, timetabling and student demand. Please contact the course team for the most up to date module list.

Year one

EGM Skills Toolbox

Year: 1

This module is designed to introduce level 4 students of environmental science and geography to a range of practical skills related to investigative work in these areas of science. This encompasses data gathering (particularly related to mapping, questionnaires, interview techniques, and focus groups), data summary and analysis, and the use of software packages for data display and analysis (Excel and SPSS). The module also provides study and writing skills, data presentation, report writing, and the use of information resources.

Society, Environment and Sustainability

Year: 1

This module introduces the theories, ideas and issues associated with the study of sustainability, spatial inequality and the environmental challenges facing society. It adopts a multi-scale approach, examining many of the environmental and developmental issues operating at the global, international, national, regional, local scales The module focuses on patterns of disparity, development and environmental degradation in the less developed world, in western Europe, and the island of Ireland.

The Lithosphere

Year: 1

This module is an introduction to general geological materials, processes and concepts. Students will learn to identify rocks, minerals and fossils, study the structure of our planet, learn to read and analyse maps, and interpret geological processes and structures in the field.

The Biosphere

Year: 1

The biosphere provides an overview of the constituent parts of the living component of the planet, beginning at the level of the individual organism. Starting with an introduction to the history of life on earth and several general concepts, this material will move into the diversity of form in plant divisions and animal phyla in light of taxonomic classification, systematics and phylogeny. These concepts will be outlined with reference to specific case studies and the current state of scientific literature on the subject. These concepts will be demonstrated through a series of practical exercises which will give an appreciation of the diversity of external and internal anatomical form of a range of different organisms and their approaches to life.

The Hydrosphere

Year: 1

The hydrosphere provides an overview of fundamental physical, chemical, hydrological and ecological concepts and processes in aquatic environments. Practical exercises in laboratory and field demonstrate and explore these concepts and processes. Accompanying lectures introduce the theoretical concepts and provide the context for practical applications.

Environmental Systems

Year: 1

This module is designed to introduce students to the theory of environmental systems and provide an understanding of systems behaviour using various environmental systems as examples. The theoretical component of the module will be provided by lectures, which will cover a contemporary thinking into concepts of environmental systems and the practical part of the module will consist of a laboratory exercises.

Year two

Ecology and Biogeography

Year: 2

Ecology is a broad discipline involving biology, chemistry and physics of the environment, geography and human impacts. Concepts of ecology, including the interactions between individuals and populations, and the structure and resilience of communities and ecosystems, will be examined with reference to specific case studies and in the context of the biosphere as a whole. A range of different ecosystems will be studied in terrestrial, freshwater, marine and microbial environments, from which case studies will be drawn. These case studies will include the key production processes in each ecosystem, in addition to model organisms at a range of trophic levels and relevant publications detailing the current state of knowledge for each system. The role of applied ecology, in relation to conservation and environmental management will also be emphasised.

Remote Sensing and Geographical Information Systems

Year: 2

This module offers students the opportunity to study the principles and applications of terrestrial and underwater remote sensing and GIS and develop links between remote sensing and GIS. Students are expected to become familiar with theoretical foundations of these technologies and to demonstrate technical principles through a series of software-based practical exercises and projects.

Enterprise, Business and Employability

Year: 2

Through a variety of teaching methods this module provides students with a range of environmental, geographical and generic employment-orientated skills and practices to help them enhance their employability potential and to integrate more effectively into the workplace. Students will gain an understanding of the various professional and career opportunities in the marketplace for Geography and Environmental Science students and have the opportunity to experience the full job application and selection process.

Environmental Planning

Year: 2

Continued development of regions and the expansion in the use of the environment and its resources requires planning and management of often complex and diverse issues and stakeholders. This module examines the relationship between society, planning and environment and explores a range of decision making approaches and the wider social implications of these. It considers the concepts and requirements of environmental impact assessment and outlines the methodology of planning an EIA.

Research Methods and Field School - Marine Cruise

Year: 2

This module is optional

This two-part module is compulsory and allows students to practise, in the field, a range of methods appropriate for work in many areas of Marine Science. This will take place within the context of a 4-day multidisciplinary scientific cruise on RV Celtic Voyager. The second part is a detailed preparation for the dissertation module, which is undertaken in the final year.

Research Methods and Field School - Environmental Science

Year: 2

This module is optional

This two-part module is compulsory and allows students to practise, in the field, a range of methods appropriate for work in many areas of Environmental Science. This will take place within the context of an integrated 8-day residential field course in Portugal. The second part is a detailed preparation for the dissertation module, which is undertaken in the final year.

Freshwater Systems

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module provides a general introduction to the physical, chemical and biological processes occurring in freshwater, including water balance processes, their management and relevance to society.

The Atmosphere

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module is designed to allow students to gain a good understanding of weather phenomena, atmospheric circulation and our climate. In addition, impact of human activity such as pollution and climate change on the atmospheric conditions and circulations will be explored. Global events such as El Nino and the Monsoon will be discussed as case studies.

Coastal & Marine Processes

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module is designed to introduce students to the interaction between coastal and marine processes and forms, and how these relate to the human use of the coastal zone and the deep sea. It examines various parameters within the coastal zone, shallow and deep water, and outlines the basic fundamentals of coastal and marine processes. Current state-of-the-art techniques used in modern coastal and marine research are described. Use is also made of the www to add supplementary material to that given in lectures.

Year three

Industrial placement - Diploma in Professional Practice (DPP)

Year: 3

This module is optional

This module provides undergraduate students with an opportunity to gain structured and professional work experience, in a work-based learning environment, as part of their planned programme of study. This experience allows students to develop, refine and reflect on their key personal and professional skills. The placement should significantly support the development of the student's employability skills, preparation for final year and enhance their employability journey.

Diploma in Intern'l Academic Stds (learning in a foreign language)

Year: 3

This module is optional

This module is a requirement of the Diploma in International Academic Studies and is mandatory for those students of Environmental Science and Geography studying in a European or International University teaching in a foreign language. It is not available to any other students. Students on this programme are required to achieve at least 50 ECTS while abroad and complete a reflective portfolio concerning their experience while at the host University.

The pass mark for the module is 40%.
The Board of Examiners may award a Pass with Commendation to a candidate who achieves an overall mark between 60% and 69% and a Pass with Distinction to a candidate who achieves an overall mark of at least 70%.

Diploma in International Academic Studies (Learning in English)

Year: 3

This module is optional

This module is a requirement of the Diploma in International Academic Studies and is mandatory for those students of Environmental Science and Geography studying in a European or International University where teaching is (mostly) carried out in English. It is not available to any other students. Students on this programme are required to achieve at least 50 ECTS while abroad and complete a reflective portfolio concerning their experience while at the host University.

The pass mark for the module is 40%.
The Board of Examiners may award a Pass with Commendation to a candidate who achieves an overall mark between 60% and 69% and a Pass with Distinction to a candidate who achieves an overall mark of at least 70%.

Year four

Geography and Environmental Sciences Dissertation

Year: 4

This module involves the completion of an individual research project conducted on an Environmental Science, Marine Science or Geography topic of students' own choice in conjunction with help from an academic member of staff (supervisor).

Research and Professional Skills

Year: 4

Through a variety of teaching methods this module provides students with a clear focus on professional career opportunities and assists them in enhancing their environmental and geographically specific employability skills. Particular emphasis is given to the translation of the specific research skills of project planning, critical literature review and methodological and analytical techniques that they employed in the dissertation project. Students will gain an understanding of the various sources of postgraduate study and professional job opportunities available to Geography and Environmental Science graduates and will provided with the opportunity to experience a full job application, interview and selection process.

Seafloor Mapping

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module outlines the theory behind the acquisition, processing, spatial-integration and interpretation of marine data, concentrating on marine acoustics. Geological, geotechnical, archaeological and biological case studies are used to explore the applications of acoustics to marine sciences. Use is made of world-wide-web for accessing extant and recently acquired digital marine data sets. This strategy reflects the increasing exploitation of the world-wide-web by marine scientists and Government Agencies to catalogue and distribute digital data.

Environmental Change

Year: 4

This module is optional

The module examines temporal and spatial signatures of environmental change with the aim of developing an understanding of landscape evolution at Quaternary to historical timescales. A range of proxy evidence (sedimentary and biological) is used to explore the links within the ice-atmosphere-ocean system in global context.

Water Resources Management

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module applies theory and techniques relevant to current issues in catchment management, water pollution and toxicology.

Advanced Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems

Year: 4

This module is optional

The module offers students the opportunity to study a variety of spatial and statistical techniques relevant to the GI Industry. Techniques from GIS and remote sensing are applied to the measurement and monitoring of spatial patterns and processes. A number of software programs are available, especially ArcGIS 10.*. Practical experience will be gained using Global Positioning Systems.

Environmental Challenges and Management

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module uses real life case studies to examine how landscapes may be managed and conserved. Examples are drawn from across a range of contexts and challenge the students to consider the complexity of decision making in environmental management. It is available to final year students in Environmental Science and Geography.

Physical and Biological Oceanography

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module is designed to examine the physical and biological aspects of the ocean environment. It provides an understanding of physical oceanic environments behaviour using various examples covering the deeper to nearshore zones. The theoretical component of the module will be provided by lectures, which will cover a contemporary thinking into physical and biological concepts of ocean science while the practical element of the module will consist of a laboratory and field exercises.

Entry conditions

We recognise a range of qualifications for admission to our courses. In addition to the specific entry conditions for this course you must also meet the University’s General Entrance Requirements.

A level

BCC preferably including STEM subject/science A-level

Subjects may include Geography, Economics, Biology, Physics, Chemistry, Mathematics, Environmental Technology/Science, Physical Education, Single Award Science, ICT, Nutrition and Food Science, Software Systems Development, Single Award Life & Health Sciences. Applied Science Double Award also acceptable.

Provided the above subject requirements are met you can substitute a combination of alternative qualifications recognised by the University for one of the A level grades.

Applied General Qualifications

*** To note that only qualifications defined as “Applied General” will be accepted for entry onto any undergraduate course at Ulster University.***

QCF Pearson BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma/ OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 Extended Diploma(2012 Suite)

Award profile of DDM

RQF Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma/ OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 Extended Diploma(2016 Suite)

Award profile of DDM

QCF Pearson BTEC Level 3 Diploma / OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 Diploma(2012 Suite)

Award profile of DM plus A Level Grade B

RQF Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Diploma/ OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 Diploma(2016 Suite)

Award profile of DM plus A Level Grade C

QCF Pearson BTEC Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma / OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 Introductory Diploma (2012 Suite)

Award profile of M plus A Level Grades BC

RQF Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate (inc. course if appropriate)/ OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 Extended Certificate(inc. course if appropriate)(2016 Suite)

Award profile of M plus A Level Grades BC

Irish Leaving Certificate

104 UCAS tariff points to include a minimum of 4 subjects at Higher Level and 1 at Ordinary Level, including English and Maths at O4/H6 or above.

Scottish Highers

The Scottish Highers requirement for this course is BCCCC.

Scottish Advanced Highers

The Scottish Advanced Highers requirement for this course is CDD

International Baccalaureate

Overall International Baccalaureate profile minimum 26 points to include 13 at Higher Level to include two subjects from the following: Geography, Economics, Biology, Physics, Chemistry, Mathematics, Physical Education, IT, Home Economics includingGrade 4 or above in Higher or Subsidiary level in English Language and Mathematics.

Access to Higher Education (HE)

Overall profile of 60% (120 credit Access Course) (NI Access Course)

Overall profile of 12 credits at distinction and 30 at merit (60 credit Access Course) (GB Access Course)

GCSE

For full-time study, you must satisfy the General Entrance requirements for admissions to a first degree course and hold a GCSE pass at grade C/grade 4 or above (or equivalent) in Maths and English.

Level 2 Certificate in Essential Skills - Communication will be accepted as equivalent to GCSE English.

Please note that for purposes of entry to this course the Level 2 Certificate in Essential / Key Skills in Application of Number is NOT regarded as an acceptable alternative to GCSE Maths.

English Language Requirements

The minimum requirement for this course is Academic IELTS 6.0 with no band score less than 5.5. Trinity ISE: Pass at level III also meets this requirement for Tier 4 visa purposes.

Ulster recognises a number of other English language tests and comparable IELTS equivalent scores.

Additional Entry Requirements

Applicants may also meet the course entry requirements with combinations of different qualifications acceptable to the University (provided subject requirements as noted above are met).

For further information regarding combination offer requirements, please contact Admissions Office staff on telephone +44 (0)28 7012 3210 or email: admissionsce@ulster.ac.uk

Exemptions and transferability

Exemption from the first year is possible if you have obtained a satisfactory grade in a Higher National Diploma in an appropriate subject or in an equivalent qualification.

United States of America flagAdditional information for students from United States of America

Undergraduate

Each programme will have slightly different requirements, both in terms of overall points and certain subjects, so please check the relevant subject in the undergraduate on-line prospectus.

Normally Ulster University welcomes applications from students with:

Qualification
High School Diploma with overall GPA 3.0 and to include grades 3,3,3 in 3 AP subjects
High School Diploma with overall GPA 3.0 and to include 1000 out of 1600 in SAT
Associate Degree with GPA 3.0

English Language


Financial Information

In addition to the scholarships and bursaries open to all international students, US students may apply for Federal and Private US loans

Qualification
Level 12 English Lang in HSD

View more information for students from United States of America  

Careers & opportunities

Graduate employers

Graduates from this course are now working for:

  • AgriFood & Biosciences Institute (AFBI)
  • DARD - Department of Agriculture and Rural Development
  • White
  • Young & Green
  • Spill Assist
  • Terra Quest Limited
  • Loughs Agency
  • Fugro

Job roles

With this degree you could become:

  • Scientific Officer
  • Waste Water Inspector
  • Environmental Consultant
  • Mapping and Charting Officer
  • Hydrographic Surveyor
  • Soil Scientist
  • Ecologist

Career options

Our graduates have found employment as environmental consultants, pollution officers with councils, environmental engineers, landscape planners, tourist officers, landscape architects, countryside wardens, environmental officers, research scientists, teachers (both primary and secondary), and many others in both the private and public sectors. Additional professional and/or postgraduate training might also be necessary. Many excellent one-year postgraduate courses are available in this School and in the UK and the Republic of Ireland.

Find out what some of our environmental science and marine science alumni have to say about their time at Ulster and what they are doing now.

Work placement / study abroad

Industrial experience

You have the option to undertake a one-year work placement (in Year 3) with an industry partner leading to the award of Diploma in Professional Practice (DPP). These work placements can be at home or abroad in an organization (company, local or central government or voluntary organization), and you will work under the supervision of an Industrial Supervisor, supported by the DPP Co-ordinator and an Academic Supervisor from within the University.

Study abroad

Alternatively, students can study in one of our partner universities in Europe, in the USA (through the Study USA programme or the International Student Exchange Programme), Australia or Tahiti. All of these international opportunities are available in Year 3 of the programme and lead to the award of a Diploma in International Academic Studies (DIAS).

Professional recognition

Institution of Environmental Sciences (IES)

Accredited by the Institution of Environmental Sciences (IES) for the purpose of eligibility to apply for associate membership.

Apply

Applications to full-time undergraduate degrees at Ulster are made through UCAS.

Start dates

  • September 2020

Fees and funding

Fees (per year)

Important notice - fees information

The tuition fees stated are for Academic Year 2020/21 for NI/ EU excluding GB*

*GB applies to a student who normally lives in England, Wales, Scotland and the Islands (Channel Islands and the Isle of Man).

Academic Year 2020/21 International and GB fees are not currently available. Further fees will be published when approved.

Correct at the time of publishing. All fees are subject to an annual increase. Terms and conditions apply. Additional mandatory costs are highlighted where they are known in advance. There are other costs associated with university study.

Northern Ireland & EU: £4,395

Scholarships, awards and prizes

DuPont prize for best final year undergraduate dissertation.

Additional mandatory costs

Students will be expected to make contributions to the cost of residential fieldwork. Residential fieldwork takes place in all years of the programme. These costs associated with these trips may vary from year to year depending on destinations but across the three years may total approximately £400.

Tuition fees and costs associated with accommodation, travel (including car parking charges), and normal living are a part of university life.

Where a course has additional mandatory expenses we make every effort to highlight them. These may include residential visits, field trips, materials (e.g. art, design, engineering) inoculations, security checks, computer equipment, uniforms, professional memberships etc.

We aim to provide students with the learning materials needed to support their studies. Our libraries are a valuable resource with an extensive collection of books and journals as well as first-class facilities and IT equipment. Computer suites and free wifi is also available on each of the campuses.

There will be some additional costs to being a student which cannot be itemised and these will be different for each student. You may choose to purchase your own textbooks and course materials or prefer your own computer and software. Printing and binding may also be required. There are additional fees for graduation ceremonies, examination resits and library fines. Additional costs vary from course to course.

Students choosing a period of paid work placement or study abroad as part of their course should be aware that there may be additional travel and living costs as well as tuition fees.

Please contact the course team for more information.

Contact

School of Geography and Environmental Sciences

Ulster University, Coleraine, United Kingdom.

Course Director

Dr Richard Douglas

E: rw.douglas@ulster.ac.uk

T: +44 (0)28 7012 3116

Course Queries

E: GES@ulster.ac.uk

T: +44 (0)28 7012 4401

Twitter: https://twitter.com/ulsteruniges

For more information visit

Faculty of Life and Health Sciences

School of Geography and Environmental Sciences

Disclaimer

  1. The University endeavours to deliver courses and programmes of study in accordance with the description set out in this prospectus. The University’s prospectus is produced at the earliest possible date in order to provide maximum assistance to individuals considering applying for a course of study offered by the University. The University makes every effort to ensure that the information contained in the prospectus is accurate but it is possible that some changes will occur between the date of printing and the start of the academic year to which it relates. Please note that the University’s website is the most up-to-date source of information regarding courses and facilities and we strongly recommend that you always visit the website before making any commitments.
  2. Although reasonable steps are taken to provide the programmes and services described, the University cannot guarantee the provision of any course or facility and the University may make variations to the contents or methods of delivery of courses, discontinue, merge or combine courses and introduce new courses if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Such circumstances include (but are not limited to) industrial action, lack of demand, departure of key staff, changes in legislation or government policy including changes, if any, resulting from the UK departing the European Union, withdrawal or reduction of funding or other circumstances beyond the University’s reasonable control.
  3. If the University discontinues any courses, it will use its best endeavours to provide a suitable alternative course. In addition, courses may change during the course of study and in such circumstances the University will normally undertake a consultation process prior to any such changes being introduced and seek to ensure that no student is unreasonably prejudiced as a consequence of any such change.
  4. The University does not accept responsibility (other than through the negligence of the University, its staff or agents), for the consequences of any modification or cancellation of any course, or part of a course, offered by the University but will take into consideration the effects on individual students and seek to minimise the impact of such effects where reasonably practicable.
  5. The University cannot accept any liability for disruption to its provision of educational or other services caused by circumstances beyond its control, but the University will take all reasonable steps to minimise the resultant disruption to such services.