Skip to navigation Skip to content

Course search

Cinematic Arts - BSc (Hons)

The start of your creative adventure into the world of film. High quality storytelling across all screens.

Take a look

Graduates from this course have gained employment with a wide range of organisations

  • BBC
  • Film Four
  • Foyle Film Festival
  • Game of Thrones (TV Series)
  • HBO
  • Krypton (TV Series)
  • Nerve Centre

Graduates from this course are employed in many different roles

  • Director
  • Producer
  • Screenwriter
  • TV Series Writer
  • Cinematographer
  • Editor
  • Sound Design

Overview

In this section

The start of your creative adventure into the world of film. High quality storytelling across all screens.

Summary

​The only course of its kind in Northern Ireland, the BSc (Hons) Cinematic Arts programme is for students who are interested in high quality storytelling on screen.

Ranked 8th in the UK for Art and Design in The Times Good University Guide 2020 and 2nd for Film Production and Photographyin The Guardian University League Tables 2020 Ulster University is one of the top places to study this highly practical and creative course.

In the age of streaming media (Netflix, Amazon Prime etc.) where content is constantly consumed, it is a very exciting time to be involved in cinema and film. Cinematic Arts will provide you with a whole host of essential skills required for filmmaking and image production across a range of platforms from mobiles and tablets through to modern 4k digital cinema screens.

A first of its kind course in the island of Ireland it has been designed with the future at the forefront, ensuring your skills remain relevant and preparing you for the ever-evolving professional world. Forging together storytelling with the very latest in professional film production standards you will develop key skills in filmmaking and image production, screenwriting for film and TV, cinematography, editing, acting and directing and music and sound design.

This extremely practical course will get you industry ready and possessing the knowledge, skills and innovative drive to compete in one of the fastest growing sectors of the economy; the creative industries.

Sign up for course updates

Sign up to receive regular updates, news and information on courses, events and developments at Ulster University.

We’ll not share your information and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Magee campus

Our vision is aligned to the strategic growth plan for the city and region

Watch the video

About this course

In this section

About

This degree is for those who want to develop practical methods in dramatic filmmaking (movies and TV series) by drawing on a variety of creative and technological disciplines.

Technology and the arts are experiencing a period of profound change. Central to this change is the way in which these previously unconnected areas of study are becoming ever more dependent on each other with respect to the creation and delivery of content for new digital media platforms.

The course is extremely practical, and 100% coursework based. With such a broad spectrum of skills covered this provides you with the opportunity to find what you enjoy and specialise in it. If you are a creative thinker interested in becoming a film director; screenwriter; film producer or production manager; cinematographer; art director, postproduction supervisor, film editor and colour grader; tv and commercial director or researcher then this course is an excellent way to gain the knowledge and experience needed to start your career.

A hands on, project-based course, taught by enthusiastic and knowledgeable staff (93% of students agreed staff made the subject interesting, Unistats, 2019) here is a flavour of some of the modules you can expect each year:

Year One focuses on visual image and developing key skills with modules including Intro to Film Art, Editing, Visual Storytelling, Light/Camera/Sound and Intro to Acting. By acquiring high-level technology and software skills you will be uniquely placed to present your ideas in innovative ways.

Year Two focuses on narrative elements including character development and production design with modules including Screenwriting, Advanced Cinematography, Advanced editing, Art Direction, Dramatic Short, Visual Effects, Independent Cinema and World Cinemas.

After successful completion of Year Two you can opt to undertake a placement year or study abroad (see Careers and Opportunities for more information) gaining a Diploma in Professional Practice (DPP) or Diploma in International Academic Studies (DIAS).

Year Three consists of optional practice-based modules which include Web Series, Film Business, Documentary Practice, Horror and Experimental Filmmaking. You will collaborate with other students to plan, produce and present a major piece of digital work. Examples of projects include film, documentary, video installation, interactive application, sound design/film score or, ideally, a mixture of a number of these areas.

This hands on, practical course replicates roles you would be performing in a real life set scenario helping to get you industry ready by graduation.

Cinematic Arts course has extensive links with international partners such as Berlin FIlm Festival where our second year students visit every year. Also A range of fim schools in Europe (Lisbon, Madrid, Budapest, Istanbul) and USA are available for a study abroad exchange year between year 2 and 3.

Associate awards

Diploma in Professional Practice DPP (open to those who opt for a placement year).

Diploma in International Academic Studies DIAS (open to those who opt to study abroad). Find out more about placement awards.

Associate awards

Diploma in Professional Practice DPP

Diploma in International Academic Studies DIAS

Diploma in Professional Practice International DPPI

Find out more about placement awards

Attendance

For this 3 year, full time degree, students are expected to be in attendance during the normal working week. Typically students will have around 12 weekly hours in class lectures a week during each semester. The majority of time is dedicated by each student to practice outside of the classroom.

In addition, students working on projects and in independent work may be required occasionally to attend for group meetings/seminars in the evenings and at weekends.

In line with the University’s attendance policy, attendance at all taught sessions is compulsory.

Start dates

  • September 2020
How to apply

Teaching, Learning and Assessment

The course is mainly taught through small classes, so you will benefit from personal attention from your lecturers and tutors. Our labs and studios will be open from early in the morning until late in the evening—it’s just as well as your ideas will often take many hours to realise thoroughly. Assessment is primarily through practical project-based coursework.

Students will benefit from guest lectures from leading artists and industry figures and will be exposed to cutting edge creative practice and debate through participation in departmental events. Assessment is 100% coursework which means there are no written exams but project submission by individual or group film work depending on the module. For example all screenwriting work is individual whereas a dramatic short project can be team work. All modules have equal weighting (20 credits).

Content

The content for each course is summarised on the relevant course page, along with an overview of the modules that make up the course.

Each course is approved by the University and meets the expectations of:

  • the relevant generic national Qualification Descriptor
  • the applicable Subject Benchmark Statement
  • the requirements of any professional, regulatory, statutory and accrediting bodies.

Attendance and Independent Study

As part of your course induction, you will be provided with details of the organisation and management of the course, including attendance and assessment requirements - usually in the form of a timetable. For full-time courses, the precise timetable for each semester is not confirmed until close to the start date and may be subject to some change in the early weeks as all courses settle into their planned patterns. For part-time courses which require attendance on particular days and times, an expectation of the days and periods of attendance will be included in the letter of offer. A course handbook is also made available.

Read more

Courses comprise modules for which the notional effort involved is indicated by its credit rating. Each credit point represents 10 hours of student effort. Undergraduate courses typically contain 10- or 20-credit modules (more usually 20) and postgraduate course typically 15- or 30-credit modules.

The normal study load expectation for an undergraduate full-time course of study in the standard academic year is 120 credit points. This amounts to around 36-42 hours of expected teaching and learning per week, inclusive of attendance requirements for lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical work, fieldwork or other scheduled classes, private study, and assessment. Part-time study load is the same as full-time pro-rata, with each credit point representing 10 hours of student effort.

Postgraduate Master’s courses typically comprise 180 credits, taken in three semesters when studied full-time. A Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) comprises 60 credits and can usually be completed on a part-time basis in one year. A 120-credit Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) can usually be completed on a part-time basis in two years.

Class contact times vary by course and type of module. Typically, for a module predominantly delivered through lectures you can expect at least 3 contact hours per week (lectures/seminars/tutorials). Laboratory classes often require a greater intensity of attendance in blocks. Some modules may combine lecture and laboratory. The precise model will depend on the course you apply for and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. Prospective students will be consulted about any significant changes.

Assessment

Assessment methods vary and are defined explicitly in each module. Assessment can be a combination of examination and coursework but may also be only one of these methods. Assessment is designed to assess your achievement of the module’s stated learning outcomes. You can expect to receive timely feedback on all coursework assessment. The precise assessment will depend on the module and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

Coursework can take many forms, for example: essay, report, seminar paper, test, presentation, dissertation, design, artefacts, portfolio, journal, group work. The precise form and combination of assessment will depend on the course you apply for and the module. Details will be made available in advance through induction, the course handbook, the module specification and the assessment timetable. The details are subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

Normally, a module will have 4 learning outcomes, and no more than 2 items of assessment. An item of assessment can comprise more than one task. The notional workload and the equivalence across types of assessment is standardised.

Calculation of the Final Award

The class of Honours awarded in Bachelor’s degrees is usually determined by calculation of an aggregate mark based on performance across the modules at Levels 5 and 6, (which correspond to the second and third year of full-time attendance).

Level 6 modules contribute 70% of the aggregate mark and Level 5 contributes 30% to the calculation of the class of the award. Classification of integrated Master’s degrees with Honours include a Level 7 component. The calculation in this case is: 50% Level 7, 30% Level 6, 20% Level 5. At least half the Level 5 modules must be studied at the University for Level 5 to be included in the calculation of the class.

All other qualifications have an overall grade determined by results in modules from the final level of study. In Master’s degrees of more than 200 credit points the final 120 points usually determine the overall grading.

Academic profile

The University employs over 1,000 suitably qualified and experienced academic staff - 59% have PhDs in their subject field and many have professional body recognition.

Courses are taught by staff who are Professors, Readers, Senior Lecturers or Lecturers.

We require most academic staff to be qualified to teach in higher education: 100% hold either Postgraduate Certificates in Higher Education Practice or higher. All academic staff are accredited fellows of the Higher Education Academy (HEA) - the university sector professional body for teaching and learning. Many academic and technical staff hold other professional body designations related to their subject or scholarly practice.

The University employs over 1,000 suitably qualified and experienced academic staff - 59% have PhDs in their subject field and many have professional body recognition.

Courses are taught by staff who are Professors (25%), Readers, Senior Lecturers (18%) or Lecturers (57%).

We require most academic staff to be qualified to teach in higher education: 82% hold either Postgraduate Certificates in Higher Education Practice or higher. Most academic staff (81%) are accredited fellows of the Higher Education Academy (HEA) - the university sector professional body for teaching and learning. Many academic and technical staff hold other professional body designations related to their subject or scholarly practice.

Read more

The profiles of many academic staff can be found on the University’s departmental websites and give a detailed insight into the range of staffing and expertise. The precise staffing for a course will depend on the department(s) involved and the availability and management of staff. This is subject to change annually and is confirmed in the timetable issued at the start of the course.

Occasionally, teaching may be supplemented by suitably qualified part-time staff (usually qualified researchers) and specialist guest lecturers. In these cases, all staff are inducted, mostly through our staff development programme ‘First Steps to Teaching’. In some cases, usually for provision in one of our out-centres, Recognised University Teachers are involved, supported by the University in suitable professional development for teaching.

Figures correct for academic year 2019-2020.

Modules

Here is a guide to the subjects studied on this course.

Courses are continually reviewed to take advantage of new teaching approaches and developments in research, industry and the professions. Please be aware that modules may change for your year of entry. The exact modules available and their order may vary depending on course updates, staff availability, timetabling and student demand. Please contact the course team for the most up to date module list.

In this section

Year one

Introduction to Film Art

Year: 1

With an emphasis on variety of film practice, this module aims to introduce students to the essential elements of film narrative and engage them in thinking critically about the choices made by film-makers in constructing the look and sound of their films. We will be asking, therefore, how meaning is created in the cinema, as well as what ideas and arguments such meanings may generate among critically aware spectators of it. In doing so we will be exploring the richness and complexity of cinema's potential to communicate with its spectators through a carefully selected variety of films. Represented amongst these will not only be the classic Hollywood model with which we are all most familiar, but also films from other national and artistic traditions. These will be examined in the context of both weekly lecture/workshops and practical tutorials.

Visual Storytelling

Year: 1

This module aims to introduce the students to the art, craft and technique of filmmaking. Students are expected to learn basic principles of film script development, pre-production processes and paperwork and final post-production stage.

Editing 1

Year: 1

This module aims to provide students with a basic of narrative editing for film. Students will be introduced to the use of non-linear editing software for filmmaking and appropriate networked lab procedures. They will gain practical experience in managing the order and timing of each shot in making editing decisions to produce positive narrative continuity.

Introduction to Acting

Year: 1

This module will introduce students to the working methods of two major twentieth century acting theorists. It will offer students the opportunity to explore these methods in a practical setting and encourage them to reflect critically on the contrasting and comparable elements of each approach.

The module is taught by tutorial and practical workshops and is assessed by 100% coursework.

Ligthing, Camera, Sound

Year: 1

This module demonstrates lighting, sound and camera techniques for digital video productions. Through in-class tutorials and group projects students will learn equipment operation and production roles. Topics also include operating film cameras, lighting setups and mixing location sound.

Issues of Performance 1: Structures of Performance

Year: 1

This module serves as an introduction to the fundamental structures of dramatic performance. Weekly lectures will introduce a range of core concepts. Students then take a weekly seminar through which they will develop the knowledge and frameworks provided to analyse the creation and reception of dramatic performances. The module will refer in detail to a range of set plays, studied from both the script and in live performance.

Year two

World Cinemas

Year: 2

This module covers the entire period from the silent era to contemporary filmmaking, taking into account the technological, formal, stylistic, socio-political, economic and cultural backgrounds of different movements and styles. Classes will be supported by film screenings.

Screenwriting

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module offers students an introduction to the terms, ideas and craft, involved in the creation of screenplays. The module explores the conventions of dramatic structure, new narrative forms and short film variations. Students are encouraged to think critically about screenplay writing and will have an opportunity to write their own screenplay. A selection of writing exercises have been designed to take them through the writing process; from preparation and initial concept to final draft. The emphasis here will be on practical knowledge and support as student's uncover their creative voice.

Cinematography

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module covers a range of areas from the technical basics of cinematography, taking full, manual control of industry standard cameras, focus pulling, camera movement (using tracks and dollies), lighting for narrative or pack shots. The module explains basic principles of cinematography - storytelling with visual imagination. By using historical (history of motion picture art) digression, comparing with painting and poetry, the module features analyses of best examples of the European, Russian and American cinematographer's work. At the same time the module provides giving basic information about practical cinematography - motion picture cameras, lenses, film stock, lighting and postproduction.

Dramatic Short

Year: 2

This module is optional

The module teaches students how to apply film production techniques such as writing for screen, directing, camera, sound and editing to effectively tell a story which will engage a wide audience. Subjects include 'industry standards'; students learn the role of the producer in establishing the financing of short films, exhibition and methods of progression beyond short films. The required skills of professional self management, including tax, liability and communication skills, will be an essential part of the student's development in this module.

Feature Screenwriting

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module aims to develop the students' ability to fully execute a feature film script to a high commercial standard. Students will show their creative writing expertise in story development, structure, plotting, character, use of arena, dialogue, visual exposition and narration. They will also complete a detailed professional production strategy to an industry standard, which places the work in a marketing and commercial arena, indicating the feasibility and practicalities of its production.

Art Direction/Production Design

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module introduces students to Art Direction and Production Design in film. The module is structured to follow the design process used by practicing Art directors and Production Designers culminating in the creation of an online Portfolio/Show Reel which they may use to disseminate their developing practice.

Editing 2

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module aims at providing the students with conceptual knowledge and the techniques of visual and audio editing. Students will learn how to develop their storytelling craft by assembling scenes and sequences. Special emphasis will be given to concepts such as cinematic space and time, cinematic reality, rhythm, and continuity. Through practical experience with digital editing software students will learn to manage the order and time of each shot and the decision process to produce positive visual continuity.

Independent Film

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module introduces the students to ideas and concepts related to film policy in the creation of independent cinema. Special focus is on Irish cinema and film festival studies.

Visual Effects

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module supports student learning in the area visual effects for film. The module is structured to support a wide range of techniques employed by visual effects artists from industry and to support individual student learning culminating in the creation of a show reel and developmental weblog of their developing practice.

Lifewide Learning & Personal Development (Cinematic Arts)

Year: 2

This module is optional

The purpose of this assessment-only module is to encourage students to reflect on and apply their lifewide learning experiences to their own personal and professional development and to their future employment. The design is highly flexible, enabling students to negotiate their preferred assessment method and to fit in and around their BSc Cinematic Arts programme.

Acting 4: Acting and Screen

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module develops acting techniques studied at Level 4 and adapts them to screen. Students become familiar with working procedures involving acting to camera and are encouraged to reflect on the place of the actor historically and in relation to creative applications in performance.

Writing for Stage and Screen

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module offers the student the opportunity to explore the processes of creative writing for a range of media, including live and filmed performance. The student will read from a range of materials and encounter a range of working methods, before opting for one medium and developing a piece of writing for performance in that medium.

Year three

International Academic Studies (Cinematic Arts)

Year: 3

This module is optional

This module provides an opportunity to undertake an extended period of study outside the UK and Republic of Ireland. Students will develop an enhanced understanding of the academic discipline whilst generating educational and cultural networks.

Industrial Placement (Cinematic Arts)

Year: 3

This module is optional

This module provides students with the opportunity to experience life as a professional in the creative industries as a paid employee of a company. They will be expected to conduct themselves professionally being an employee of a company and an ambassador for the University during this period. They will be supported by an academic coordinator.

Year four

The Business of TV & Film

Year: 4

The module seeks to develop students' awareness of the business context of Cinematic Arts, so that they gain an understanding of distribution, financing, marketing & how to launch their own careers.

Final Project (Practice)

Year: 4

This module involves students in designing a project and negotiation with an appointed member of staff suitable learning outcomes (including technologies, artistic output and presentational issues and contextual/theoretical development) and assessment strategies. The project's practice-based elements must be of a suitable scope to be public-facing. The project should also incorporate forms of learning undertaken in the previous two years.

Final Project (Theory & Context)

Year: 4

This module involved students in designing a project and negotiation with an appointed member of staff suitable learning outcomes (including technologies, artistic output and presentational issues and contextual/theoretical development) and assessment strategies. The project's practice-based elements must be of a suitable scope to be public-facing. The project should also incorporate forms of learning undertaken in the previous two years.

Web Series

Year: 4

This module is optional

This module will provide concepts related to web series development. Students will learn to critically assess the differences between conventional television and web series and be able to develop, shoot and upload a web series.

Documentary Practice

Year: 4

This module is optional

The module concentrates on documentary film project research, development, and realisation. The students will individually develop and direct a documentary film with the technical and creative support of their peers under the guidance and support of the module coordinator. Activities will include project-oriented writing assignments; practical research assignments; exercises in visual story-telling; individual pitch presentations, discussions and evaluations; practical camera and sound exercises.

Horror Film: Theory and Practice

Year: 4

This module is optional

This is a module on horror film genre its theoretical background and practice.

Experimental Film Practice

Year: 4

This module is optional

The module focuses on Experimental Film and Alternative Cinema in theory and practice. The students will individually develop and direct an Experimental Film with the technical and creative support of their peers under the guidance and support of the module coordinator. Activities will include screenings and discussion; the writing of a treatment and proposal; the chronicling of experimental practice on a developmental weblog; and the completion and submission of a final film piece as a manifestation of the student's voice as a filmmaker.

Law, film and visual culture

Year: 4

This module is optional

Law, Film and Visual Culture is a deliberately alternative approach to the traditional study of law, both in terms of the basic materials used to ground an approach to the topics under study, and in the teaching arrangements. It is an attempt to foster a developed spirit and capacity in critical intelligence in relation to the cultural make-up of the social environment and thus aims for wide applicability and to break the notion of law as confined to a specific arena.

Entry conditions

We recognise a range of qualifications for admission to our courses. In addition to the specific entry conditions for this course you must also meet the University’s General Entrance Requirements.

In this section

A level

The A Level requirement for this course is BBC at A2. Applicants may satisfy the requirement for the A level C grade by substituting a combination of alternative qualifications to the same standard as defined by the University.

An A-level GCSE in Moving Image Arts is not a requirement. There are also no interview or portfolio requirements.

Applied General Qualifications

QCF Pearson BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma/ OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 Extended Diploma2012 Suite

Award profile of DDD

RQF Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma/ OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 Extended Diploma2016 Suite

Award profile of DMM

QCF Pearson BTEC Level 3 Diploma / OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 Diploma (2012 Suite)

Award profile of DD plus A Level Grade C or Award profile DM plus A Level B

RQF Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Diploma/ OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 Diploma(2016 Suite)

Award profile of DM plus A Level Grade C

QCF Pearson BTEC Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma / OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 Introductory Diploma (2012 Suite)

Award profile of M plus A Level Grades BB

RQF Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate/ OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 Extended Certificate(2016 Suite)

Award profile of M plus A Level Grades BB

Irish Leaving Certificate

The Irish Leaving Certificate requirement for this course is H3,H3,H3,H3,H4 at higher level. Applicants are also required to have Higher Level English Grade H6 or above OR Ordinary Level at grade 04 or above.

Scottish Highers

The Scottish Highers requirement for this course is BBCCC.

Applicants may satisfy the requirement for an element of the offer grade profiles (equating to the final A-level grade stated in the standard 3A level offer profile - grade C) by substituting a combination of alternative qualifications to the same standard as defined by the University.

Scottish Advanced Highers

The Scottish Advanced Highers requirement for this course is CCD.

Applicants may satisfy the requirement for an element of the offer grade profiles (equating to the final A-level grade stated in the standard 3A level offer profile - grade C) by substituting a combination of alternative qualifications to the same standard as defined by the University.

International Baccalaureate

Overall International Baccalaureate profile minimum of 25 points to include 12 at higher level.

Access to Higher Education (HE)

For Access qualifications validated by Ulster University or QUB the entry requirement is:

An overall mark of 65%.

For GB QAA accredited Higher Education Diploma qualifications the entry requirement is as follows:

Award of the HE Diploma in a related subject area, achieving a minimum of 18 credits at distinction and 24 credits at merit in the 45 level 3 graded credits.

GCSE

Please refer to the University’s general entrance requirements.

English Language Requirements

English language requirements for international applicants:

The minimum requirement for this course is Academic IELTS 6.0 with no band score less than 5.5.

Trinity ISE: Pass at level III also meets this requirement for Tier 4 visa purposes.

Ulster recognises a number of other English language tests and comparable IELTS equivalent scores.

Additional Entry Requirements

HND

Applicants holding an HND should achieve an overall Merit award (dependeing on the students' background, they may be accepted for direct entry to Year Two).

HNC

Applicants holding an HNC with overall Distinction award will be considered on an individual basis for Year One entry only.

Foundation Degree

Applicants studying on Ulster Foundation Degree courses should achieve an overall mark of 50% in level 5 modules for entry to Year One.

APEL (Accreditation of Prior Experiential Learning)

The University will consider applications on the basis of experiential learning for those who do not hold the normal entry qualifications. Those applicants seeking entry with advanced standing, (eg.Transfer from another institution) will be considered on an individual basis.

Exemptions and transferability

Students wishing to transfer to the degree at Ulster from other institutions may apply via UCAS for entry into Year 2 provided they can demonstrate equivalence in their learning to that point. Prior learning, including experiential learning, may be evaluated as a basis for admission at any stage of the programme. Decisions will be made on a case-by-case basis.

Careers & opportunities

In this section

Graduate employers

Graduates from this course have gained employment with a wide range of organisations. Here are some examples:

  • BBC
  • Film Four
  • Foyle Film Festival
  • Game of Thrones (TV Series)
  • HBO
  • Krypton (TV Series)
  • Nerve Centre

Job roles

Graduates from this course are employed in many different roles. Here are some examples:

  • Director
  • Producer
  • Screenwriter
  • TV Series Writer
  • Cinematographer
  • Editor
  • Sound Design

Career options

Cinematic Arts graduates will complete their studies possessing a range of valuable and transferrable skills in key areas of moving image content development/production, communication and creative thinking. With such interdisciplinary skills future career opportunities aren’t limited to the cinematic world, other relevant roles and industries include:

  • Filmmaking (Director/producer)
  • Screenwriting (feature films, TV series)
  • Editing/cinematography
  • Sound Design for Film and TV
  • Advertising (commercial director)
  • Acting for Screen
  • Research (Masters and doctorare in cinema and media studies)

For information on postgraduate research opportunities see: http://arts.ulster.ac.uk/rgs/

Career Sample of Recent Grads:

Megan McArdle: Assistant Director, BBC NI, Winner of RTS NI Best Short Film Award 2018

Lana Knox: Production Assistant on Guillermo del Toro's 'Antlers'

Ayrton McGurgan:Camera Operator on Disney's 'The Lodge'

Orla Finucane: Script Supervisor, Game of Thrones

Ciarán Mullin:Media Trainer at Nerve Centre

Work placement / study abroad

On successful completion of Year 2 studies, you have the opportunity to take the optional module Diploma in Professional Practice (DPP) or (DPPI). This provides an opportunity for you to gain first hand practical experience within a professional environment such as an advertising agency or brand consultancy prior to your final year of study. This module links the education experience to the real life situation of practice in the creative industries. It provides you with a range of experiences and skills relative to your practice, future career and professional development.

You also have the opportunity to take the other optional module Diploma in International Academic Studies (DIAS). This optional module provides an opportunity for you to undertake an extended period of study outside the UK and Republic of Ireland, developing an international perspective and an appreciation of cultural sensitivities which are desirable qualities in any graduate. You will develop an enhanced understanding of the academic discipline whilst generating educational and cultural networks.

Past students have successfully completed placements at Hedgehogs vs Foxes (Dublin) and have studied filmmaking abroad in the USA, Denmark, Hungary, Madrid, Portugal and Turkey.

Apply

How to apply Request a prospectus

Applications to full-time undergraduate degrees at Ulster are made through UCAS.

Start dates

  • September 2020

Fees and funding

In this section

Fees (per year)

Important notice - fees information Fees illustrated are based on 19/20 entry and are subject to an annual increase. Correct at the time of publishing. Terms and conditions apply. Additional mandatory costs are highlighted where they are known in advance. There are other costs associated with university study.
Visit our Fees pages for full details of fees

Northern Ireland & EU:
£4,275.00

England, Scotland, Wales
and the Islands:

£9,250.00  Discounts available

International:
£14,060.00  Scholarships available

Scholarships, awards and prizes

N/A

Additional mandatory costs

Entering students are encouraged to purchase their own external harddrives (around £70). Some compulosry modules may require to buy a textbook. The School provides a range of resources incl. computer workstations, cameras, lighting, and sound equipment which can be utilised by students with aporoariate training. Additionally, the Magee library is well stocked with the vast majority of required reading and viewing.

Tuition fees and costs associated with accommodation, travel (including car parking charges), and normal living are a part of university life.

Where a course has additional mandatory expenses we make every effort to highlight them. These may include residential visits, field trips, materials (e.g. art, design, engineering) inoculations, security checks, computer equipment, uniforms, professional memberships etc.

We aim to provide students with the learning materials needed to support their studies. Our libraries are a valuable resource with an extensive collection of books and journals as well as first-class facilities and IT equipment. Computer suites and free wifi is also available on each of the campuses.

There will be some additional costs to being a student which cannot be itemised and these will be different for each student. You may choose to purchase your own textbooks and course materials or prefer your own computer and software. Printing and binding may also be required. There are additional fees for graduation ceremonies, examination resits and library fines. Additional costs vary from course to course.

Students choosing a period of paid work placement or study abroad as part of their course should be aware that there may be additional travel and living costs as well as tuition fees.

Please contact the course team for more information.

Contact

Course Director: Dr Murat Akser

T: +44 28 7167 5202

E: m.akser@ulster.ac.uk

Admissions Office - Claire Tinkler or Karen Gibson

T: +44 (0)28 7012 3895 or +44 (0)28 701 24353

E: cm.tinkler@ulster.ac.uk or ki.gibson@ulster.ac.uk

International Admissions Office

E: internationaladmissions@ulster.ac.uk

For more information visit

Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

School of Arts and Humanities

Disclaimer

  1. The University endeavours to deliver courses and programmes of study in accordance with the description set out in this prospectus. The University’s prospectus is produced at the earliest possible date in order to provide maximum assistance to individuals considering applying for a course of study offered by the University. The University makes every effort to ensure that the information contained in the prospectus is accurate but it is possible that some changes will occur between the date of printing and the start of the academic year to which it relates. Please note that the University’s website is the most up-to-date source of information regarding courses and facilities and we strongly recommend that you always visit the website before making any commitments.
  2. Although reasonable steps are taken to provide the programmes and services described, the University cannot guarantee the provision of any course or facility and the University may make variations to the contents or methods of delivery of courses, discontinue, merge or combine courses and introduce new courses if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Such circumstances include (but are not limited to) industrial action, lack of demand, departure of key staff, changes in legislation or government policy including changes, if any, resulting from the UK departing the European Union, withdrawal or reduction of funding or other circumstances beyond the University’s reasonable control.
  3. If the University discontinues any courses, it will use its best endeavours to provide a suitable alternative course. In addition, courses may change during the course of study and in such circumstances the University will normally undertake a consultation process prior to any such changes being introduced and seek to ensure that no student is unreasonably prejudiced as a consequence of any such change.
  4. The University does not accept responsibility (other than through the negligence of the University, its staff or agents), for the consequences of any modification or cancellation of any course, or part of a course, offered by the University but will take into consideration the effects on individual students and seek to minimise the impact of such effects where reasonably practicable.
  5. The University cannot accept any liability for disruption to its provision of educational or other services caused by circumstances beyond its control, but the University will take all reasonable steps to minimise the resultant disruption to such services.

Testimonials

"During my time studying Cinematic Arts, I have been involved in numerous professional productions: feature films, short films, television and events. Ulster University has supported me working on different productions whilst being a full-time student, to gain invaluable insight and contacts within the industry. I am now associated with companies such as BBC, ITV, Stellify Media, Thames TV, Fine Point Films, Side of Stage and have travelled around the UK and as far as Los Angeles for work." - Megan McArdle (Production Assistant on Krypton)

"When deciding to apply for university, I was sure I wanted to complete a degree that was practice-centred, so that when I graduated, I would have the necessary skills to achieve my career goals. Cinematic Arts is just that! The course not only taught me the skills required to make it in the industry, but it let me build a multi-media portfolio; meet like-minded young individuals and industry professionals; get experience on the set of a Disney production; and take placements, apprenticeships and internships, which has led to my employment as an independent filmmaker in the creative industries. Without the course and the help, support and guidance given to me by my lecturers and peers, I wouldn't have the experience or the confidence to be in the position that I am in today." Ayrton McGurgan (Camera Operator on The Lodge)

"Before I came to Ulster university, I was working for a local film production company in Derry. Although, I felt like I was letting people down due to the quality of my work, because I was never taught how to make films, i.e. cinematography skills. Since joining the Cinematic Arts programme, I have been able to deliver high quality productions! I recently attended the International Community Arts Festival in Rotterdam as a cinematographer. This programme is the most practical one out there and I’m so glad I joined the team!" - William Ayton (Freelance Cinematographer)