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Graduates from this course are employed in many different roles

  • Graduate Management Trainee
  • Junior Manager

Overview

Business@Magee: Providing extensive choice for business skills development.

Summary

Studying business at the Magee campus provides students with extensive choice. In this case Business Studies may be taken as a Major subject with Drama as the Minor subject.

The flexible structure of this programme affords students the opportunity of choosing a pathway to suit their own personal interests and career aspirations. Graduates will have generic skills in particular management functions, for example accounting, marketing and human resource management. The programme is particularly suited for graduates wishing to go on to develop a career in management.

The programme equips graduates for a management career in industry, commerce or the public sector. It also provides the entrepreneurial and innovation skills necessary for the creation of new business ventures and to stimulate the competitive impetus for managing and developing existing businesses. In addition, the programme supports and enables students to develop their employability skills throughout their undergraduate degree to ensure that graduates are prepared and skilled for the future labour market. Drama as a minor subject helps develop supporting expertise of particular interest to the student.

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About this course

In this section

About

The BSc Hons Business Studies with Drama meets the needs of those wishing to pursue a career in business with an interest in Drama as a minor subject. In addition it provides the basis for graduates wishing to take a postgraduate programme up to doctoral level.

The programme seeks to provide the key business knowledge and skills essential for a graduate, seeking a managerial career in general business with a specialist interest in Drama.

The development of relevant employability skills is at the core of the BSc Hons Business Studies with Drama degree and a variety of opportunities exist within the programme and its modules, to develop such skills. These skills include, for example, Creative Thinking, Project Management, Strategic Planning, Business start-up, Problem Solving and Interpersonal skills.

All staff delivering the business studies programme have strong links with industry. Many have secured professional recognition with a variety of industry bodies relevant to their discipline such as Chartered Institute of Marketing, Institute of Exporters and Chartered Accountants Ireland and ACCA. In addition, all staff within the Department of Global Business and Enterprise are fellows/senior fellows of the Higher Education Academy.

Associate awards

Diploma in Professional Practice DPP

Diploma in International Academic Studies DIAS

Diploma in Professional Practice International DPPI

Find out more about placement awards

Attendance

Three years without placement or four years including placement year. This is a full-time course where you will normally complete six modules per year, with class contact time approximately three hours per week per module. You will be expected to undertake independent study to supplement that contact of around 10 hours per week per module.

Start dates

  • September 2020
How to apply

Teaching and learning assessment

Content

The content for each course is summarised on the relevant course page, along with an overview of the modules that make up the course.

Each course is approved by the University and meets the expectations of:

- the relevant generic national Qualification Descriptor

- the applicable Subject Benchmark Statement

- the requirements of any professional, regulatory, statutory and accrediting bodies.

Attendance and Independent Study

As part of your course induction, you will be provided with details of the organisation and management of the course, including attendance and assessment requirements - usually in the form of a timetable. For full-time courses, the precise timetable for each semester is not confirmed until close to the start date and may be subject to some change in the early weeks as all courses settle into their planned patterns. For part-time courses which require attendance on particular days and times, an expectation of the days and periods of attendance will be included in the letter of offer. A course handbook is also made available.

Courses comprise modules for which the notional effort involved is indicated by its credit rating. Each credit point represents 10 hours of student effort. Undergraduate courses typically contain 10- or 20-credit modules (more usually 20) and postgraduate course typically 15- or 30-credit modules.

The normal study load expectation for an undergraduate full-time course of study in the standard academic year is 120 credit points. This amounts to around 36-42 hours of expected teaching and learning per week, inclusive of attendance requirements for lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical work, fieldwork or other scheduled classes, private study, and assessment. Part-time study load is the same as full-time pro-rata, with each credit point representing 10 hours of student effort.

Postgraduate Master’s courses typically comprise 180 credits, taken in three semesters when studied full-time. A Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) comprises 60 credits and can usually be completed on a part-time basis in one year. A 120-credit Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) can usually be completed on a part-time basis in two years.

Class contact times vary by course and type of module. Typically, for a module predominantly delivered through lectures you can expect at least 3 contact hours per week (lectures/seminars/tutorials). Laboratory classes often require a greater intensity of attendance in blocks. Some modules may combine lecture and laboratory. The precise model will depend on the course you apply for and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. Prospective students will be consulted about any significant changes.

Assessment

Assessment methods vary and are defined explicitly in each module. Assessment can be a combination of examination and coursework but may also be only one of these methods. Assessment is designed to assess your achievement of the module’s stated learning outcomes. You can expect to receive timely feedback on all coursework assessment. The precise assessment will depend on the module and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

Coursework can take many forms, for example: essay, report, seminar paper, test, presentation, dissertation, design, artefacts, portfolio, journal, group work. The precise form and combination of assessment will depend on the course you apply for and the module. Details will be made available in advance through induction, the course handbook, the module specification and the assessment timetable. The details are subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

Normally, a module will have 4 learning outcomes, and no more than 2 items of assessment. An item of assessment can comprise more than one task. The notional workload and the equivalence across types of assessment is standardised.

Calculation of the Final Award

The class of Honours awarded in Bachelor’s degrees is usually determined by calculation of an aggregate mark based on performance across the modules at Levels 5 and 6, (which correspond to the second and third year of full-time attendance).

Level 6 modules contribute 70% of the aggregate mark and Level 5 contributes 30% to the calculation of the class of the award. Classification of integrated Master’s degrees with Honours include a Level 7 component. The calculation in this case is: 50% Level 7, 30% Level 6, 20% Level 5. At least half the Level 5 modules must be studied at the University for Level 5 to be included in the calculation of the class.

All other qualifications have an overall grade determined by results in modules from the final level of study. In Master’s degrees of more than 200 credit points the final 120 points usually determine the overall grading.

Teaching and learning methods include lectures, seminars, practical workshops, case studies, problem-solving techniques, team projects, individual research, oral presentations, non-book media, visiting lectures with industry practitioners, applied projects and 'real' live assignments. These methods allow students to have a high degree of involvement and participation in learning, equipping participants with concepts, skills and experiences necessary for career and personal development in addition to supporting the application of knowledge in practice. In addition, the Drama modules will be assessed using various productions and discipline relevant appraoches.

Modules are assessed using a variety of methods including individual essays/reports, class tests, case studies, group projects, oral presentations and end of term examinations.

Modules

Here is a guide to the subjects studied on this course.

Courses are continually reviewed to take advantage of new teaching approaches and developments in research, industry and the professions. Please be aware that modules may change for your year of entry. The exact modules available and their order may vary depending on course updates, staff availability, timetabling and student demand. Please contact the course team for the most up to date module list.

In this section

Year one

Principles of Management

Year: 1

This module introduces the fundamental concepts of management and cognate topics, including the business environment, business ethics, motivation, problem solving and decision making, planning, human resource management, organisational structure, change and innovation, and operations and quality.

Students will acquire an understanding of the issues and challenges facing managers in both domestic and global environments.

Academic and Career Enhancement skills

Year: 1

The module establishes a solid foundation for students as they make the transition to become effective learners at third level. As such, the module identifies, develops and assesses a range of skills that are important for academic achievement. In this module, student learning, progression and achievement is closely monitored and supported by the module coordinator.

Issues of Performance 1: Structures of Dramatic Performance

Year: 1

This module serves as an introduction to the fundamental structures of dramatic performance. Weekly lectures will introduce a range of core concepts. Students then take a weekly seminar through which they will develop the knowledge and frameworks provided to analyse the creation and reception of dramatic performances. The module will refer in detail to a range of set plays, studied from both the script and in live performance.

Issues in Performance 2: The Theatrical Space

Year: 1

Issues in Performance 2: The Theatrical Space introduces students to core concepts relating to space, a defining feature of performance. It encompasses historical and contemporary performance practices to explore the relationships between space, form and function in performance. This compulsory drama module continues to develop good study skills and to extend critical vocabularies established in DRA101. It is team-taught, by a lecture and small-group seminar each week. Assessment 100% coursework

Principles of Economics

Year: 1

This module introduces students to the fundamental concepts and principles of economics and provides an essential underpinning for more advanced study of economics and economic issues.

Principles of Marketing

Year: 1

The module specifically provides students with understanding of the key principles and concepts of marketing to allow further learning of the strategic importance of the area in the future.

Year two

Finance for Decision Making

Year: 2

Financial decisions and their implications are an important consideration for global business'. This module will examine a range of theoretical and practical issues surrounding financial decision making. The module will provide students with an understanding of the key issues and techniques used in financial decision making with particular emphasis placed on ethical corporate governance and business ethics within the context of financial decision making.

Organisational behaviour

Year: 2

This module will introduce the fundamental concepts of Organisational Behaviour and encourage students to develop an understanding of managing and developing people in a business context. The module will examine a range of theoretical approaches that will be used to help analyse and evaluate situations and issues relevant to behaviour within organisations.

Professional Skills Development

Year: 2

This module is designed to provide students with the necessary tool kit to lead their own professional credibility, during and after their under graduate study. It will provide an interactive and experiential learning environment for students whereby they can learn about the kind of business leader they want to become and how to achieve this

Operations and Supply Chain Management

Year: 2

Operations and supply chain management is the planning, design, organization, and control of the flow of information and materials along the supply chain in order to meet customer requirements. The aim of this module is to assist students in the analysis of developments enhancing the role of operations and supply chain management, and enable them to develop and manage operational strategies to meet corporate objectives.

Issues in Performance 4: Form and Function

Year: 2

This module interrogates key conceptual, aesthetic, ethical, and political debates both explicit and implicit in contemporary performance practice. As a means of exploring these issues, the module lays emphasis on the relationships between form and function of performance works and how the exploration of these concepts leads us to an analysis of the potential efficacy of performance. This module is taught by seminars and is assessed by 100% coursework.

Issues in Performance 3: Critical Theory

Year: 2

This seminar based module seeks to introduce key aesthetic concepts of theatricality, pleasure in representation, and theatrical reception, through the study of play texts and live performances. The module encourages the student to apply critical readings and concepts to the analysis of primary texts, and to reflect on their practical work and experiences as spectators.

Assessment: 100% Coursework

Year three

Issues in Performance 5: Documenting the live

Year: 3

This module seeks to interrogate the documentation of performance through the development of appropriate critical concepts and vocabulary. It explores the relationship between notation, documentation and live performance with a unifying focus on concepts of authenticity. It is taught by lecture and seminar and requires students to learn by reading and undertaking practice, reflecting and discussing. Assessment: 100% coursework.

Diploma in Professional Practice

Year: 3

This module is optional

This module provides undergraduate students with an opportunity to gain structured and professional work experience, in a work-based learning environment, as part of their planned programme of study. This experience allows students to develop, refine and reflect on their key personal and professional skills. The placement should significantly support the development of the student's employability skills, preparation for final year and enhance their employability journey.

Study Abroad

Year: 3

This module is optional

The Diploma in International Academic Studies complements and extends the student's programme of study and provides the opportunity for each student to pursue specific learning objectives by studying in a different cultural and educational environment. It is a key facilitator in support global and cultural awareness and creating graduates who are ready to embrace international career opportunities more effectively.

Storytelling and Performance

Year: 3

This module is optional

This module provides students with the opportunity to explore storytelling as a performance form within a range of theatrical settings. Practical exploration allows students to engage with the form from within, while independent research and in-class discussion provides the opportunity to contextualise and analyse practices encountered. Assessment.

North American Theatre

Year: 3

This module is optional

This research-led module offers students the opportunity to engage with a range of theoretical perspectives, to explore the work of a number of North American playwrights and performers, and to interrogate a range of theoretical and performance practices. Students are encouraged to pursue their own research interests in their second, negotiated assessment. Assessment: 100% coursework.

Contemporary Irish Theatre

Year: 3

This module is optional

This module looks in detail at contemporary Irish theatre practice and in doing so enables students to focus their understanding of contemporary Irish theatre by placing it in a range of relevant discursive and theoretical contexts. Students will read a range of contemporary playtexts and see a range of performances. This module is taught by seminar and assessed by 100% coursework.

Writing for Stage and Screen

Year: 3

This module is optional

This module offers the student the opportunity to explore the processes of creative writing for a range of media, including live performance, mediatised performance and digital gaming. The student will read from a range of materials and encounter a range of working methods, before opting for one medium and developing a piece of writing for performance in that medium.

Arts Entrepreneurship

Year: 3

This module is optional

This module develops students' creative engagement with the industry through an exploration of the marketplace, and of the processes involved in setting up and running a new business in the creative and cultural industries. The module has been developed in consultation with the Northern Ireland Centre for Entrepreneurship and aims to develop students' understanding of entrepreneurial practice and thinking in the creative and cultural industries.

Working Class Theatre

Year: 3

This module is optional

This module seeks to provide an opportunity for students to explore, both practically and critically, the key issues and performance practices associated with working class theatre in the twentieth century. Students are encouraged to interrogate these theories and practices in both tutorial and workshop-based situations.

Assessment: 100% coursework

Performance and Conflict Transformation

Year: 3

This module is optional

This module equips students to use their skills, knowledge and experience in analysing and creating performance within the context of conflict or post-conflict society. Taught through lectures, seminars and workshops, the module focuses on engaging with local and international post-conflict issues and the development of independent projects.

Assessment: 100% coursework

Performance and Health

Year: 3

This module is optional

This module provides students with the opportunity to explore performance as a means of enhancing wellbeing, challenging stigmatisation and promoting awareness of health issues. Practical exploration allows students to engage with the issues and formal techniques from within, while independent research and in-class discussion provides the opportunity to contextualise and analyse practices encountered.

Assessment: 100% coursework

Theatre and Ritual

Year: 3

This module is optional

This option investigates radical performance practices of the ritualised forms of theatre from modernism to postmodernism and beyond. Students will explore, interrogate and evaluate the theoretical underpinnings, practical methodologies, and performance outcomes of selected bodies of practice and create new work by applying the ideas they have encountered to performance practice in a studio environment. It will be of particular interest to students wishing to pursue innovative contemporary practice or undertake practice-based research after graduation.

Assessment: 100% coursework

Year four

Entrepreneurship and innovation

Year: 4

This module aims to equip students with a knowledge and understanding of entrepreneurial and innovation processes, and their relationship with business and economic development. It will enable students to develop the skills necessary to participate in business venturing projects. Assessment is by coursework and examination

Global Business Environment

Year: 4

This module explores the complexity of forces that make up the global economy. In particular, it aims to understand the impact of these forces on the activities of the firm, and the decisions they must take if they are to survive and prosper. The module will focus on the national, regional, and international contexts, and will aim to give students an understanding of an increasingly volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous global business environment.

Leadership and Strategy

Year: 4

This module equips students with an understanding of leadership dynamics and strategic vision in organisations and the challenges associated with leading organisations through strategic change. The module will examine a range of theoretical approaches that will be used to help analyse and evaluate leadership and strategy in organisations.

Research Methods for Business

Year: 4

In the course of this module, students will develop an understanding of, and the ability to use, the core theories and techniques underpinning business research - both academic research and applied research. This will be supported by providing students with the knowledge required to utilise appropriate software for the analysis and presentation of research

Entry conditions

We recognise a range of qualifications for admission to our courses. In addition to the specific entry conditions for this course you must also meet the University’s General Entrance Requirements.

In this section

A level

The A Level requirement for this course is BBC - BBB.

Applicants may be able to satisfy the requirement for one A-Level B or C grade by substituting a combination of alternative qualifications to the same standard as defined by UCAS.

Applied General Qualifications

Overall BTEC award profile DMM - DDM to include Unit profile of 8 - 9 distinctions.

Irish Leaving Certificate

Overall Irish Leaving Certificate profile H3, H3, H3, H3, H3 – H3, H3, H3, H4, H4.

Scottish Highers

The Scottish Highers requirement for this course is BBBCC – BCCCC.

Scottish Advanced Highers

The Scottish Advanced Highers requirement for this course is CCC - CDD.

International Baccalaureate

Overall International Baccalaureate profile minimum 25 points (12 at higher level).

Access to Higher Education (HE)

Overall Access profile 66% - 70%.

GCSE

For full-time study, you must satisfy the General Entrance Requirements for admission to a first degree course and hold a GCSE pass in English Language and Mathematics at grade C or above (or equivalent).

Essential Skills Level 2 Mathematics will be accepted as equivalent to GCSE Maths.

Essential Skills Level 2 Communication will be accepted as equivalent to GCSE English.

English Language Requirements

English language requirements for international applicants
The minimum requirement for this course is Academic IELTS 6.0 with no band score less than 5.5. Trinity ISE: Pass at level III also meets this requirement for Tier 4 visa purposes.

Ulster recognises a number of other English language tests and comparable IELTS equivalent scores.

Exemptions and transferability

Most students enter Year 1. Applicants who can provide evidence of previous relevant study, awarded in accordance with the Credit Accumulation Transfer System, (CATS), may be considered for exemption from particular modules. In appropriate cases opportunities exist at the end of Year 1 for transfer between this programme and other first-degree programmes in the Department.

Careers & opportunities

In this section

Job roles

Graduates from this course are employed in many different roles. Here are some examples:

  • Graduate Management Trainee
  • Junior Manager

Career options

Graduates are well placed for a management career in the business arena with a specialist interest in Drama or to take advantage of opportunities in the public sector. Depending on the choice of business specialism, graduates will have generic skills in management functions including management accounting, finance and project management. Graduates may also proceed to postgraduate study or research in related areas. Throughout the course, students will be encouraged to develop their personal skills and abilities in order to maximize their career potential. In addition students will be supported and encouraged to reflect on career choices and plan their graduate career path through employer engagement, career fairs and careers staff counsel and advice amongst others.

Work placement / study abroad

In Year 3 you will have the option of a paid placement year in a range of local and international locations. This will provide a link between the subjects you have studied and their application in a 'real world' setting. Satisfactory completion of the placement year will lead to the award of the Diploma in Professional Practice or Diploma in Professional Practice (International) if you complete your work placement internationally. You also have the option to study abroad for a year; satisfactory completion of a study abroad year will lead to the award of the Diploma in International Academic Studies.

Academic profile

The University employs over 1,000 suitably qualified and experienced academic staff - 59% have PhDs in their subject field and many have professional body recognition.

Courses are taught by staff who are Professors (25%), Readers, Senior Lecturers (18%) or Lecturers (57%).

We require most academic staff to be qualified to teach in higher education: 82% hold either Postgraduate Certificates in Higher Education Practice or higher. Most academic staff (81%) are accredited fellows of the Higher Education Academy (HEA) - the university sector professional body for teaching and learning. Many academic and technical staff hold other professional body designations related to their subject or scholarly practice.

The profiles of many academic staff can be found on the University’s departmental websites and give a detailed insight into the range of staffing and expertise. The precise staffing for a course will depend on the department(s) involved and the availability and management of staff. This is subject to change annually and is confirmed in the timetable issued at the start of the course.

Occasionally, teaching may be supplemented by suitably qualified part-time staff (usually qualified researchers) and specialist guest lecturers. In these cases, all staff are inducted, mostly through our staff development programme ‘First Steps to Teaching’. In some cases, usually for provision in one of our out-centres, Recognised University Teachers are involved, supported by the University in suitable professional development for teaching.

Figures correct for academic year 2019-2020.

Apply

How to apply Request a prospectus

Applications to full-time undergraduate degrees at Ulster are made through UCAS.

Start dates

  • September 2020

Fees and funding

In this section

Fees (per year)

Important notice - fees information Fees illustrated are based on 19/20 entry and are subject to an annual increase. Correct at the time of publishing. Terms and conditions apply. Additional mandatory costs are highlighted where they are known in advance. There are other costs associated with university study.
Visit our Fees pages for full details of fees

Northern Ireland & EU:
£4,275.00

England, Scotland, Wales
and the Islands:

£9,250.00  Discounts available

International:
£14,060.00  Scholarships available

Scholarships, awards and prizes

  • Londonderry Junior Chamber of Commerce Prize for Industrial Placement
  • SCHIVO Prize for Best Business Studies Student
  • Bank of Ireland Award

Additional mandatory costs

Tuition fees and costs associated with accommodation, travel (including car parking charges), and normal living are a part of university life.

Where a course has additional mandatory expenses we make every effort to highlight them. These may include residential visits, field trips, materials (e.g. art, design, engineering) inoculations, security checks, computer equipment, uniforms, professional memberships etc.

We aim to provide students with the learning materials needed to support their studies. Our libraries are a valuable resource with an extensive collection of books and journals as well as first-class facilities and IT equipment. Computer suites and free wifi is also available on each of the campuses.

There will be some additional costs to being a student which cannot be itemised and these will be different for each student. You may choose to purchase your own textbooks and course materials or prefer your own computer and software. Printing and binding may also be required. There are additional fees for graduation ceremonies, examination resits and library fines. Additional costs vary from course to course.

Students choosing a period of paid work placement or study abroad as part of their course should be aware that there may be additional travel and living costs as well as tuition fees.

Please contact the course team for more information.

Disclaimer

  1. The University endeavours to deliver courses and programmes of study in accordance with the description set out in this prospectus. The University’s prospectus is produced at the earliest possible date in order to provide maximum assistance to individuals considering applying for a course of study offered by the University. The University makes every effort to ensure that the information contained in the prospectus is accurate but it is possible that some changes will occur between the date of printing and the start of the academic year to which it relates. Please note that the University’s website is the most up-to-date source of information regarding courses and facilities and we strongly recommend that you always visit the website before making any commitments.
  2. Although reasonable steps are taken to provide the programmes and services described, the University cannot guarantee the provision of any course or facility and the University may make variations to the contents or methods of delivery of courses, discontinue, merge or combine courses and introduce new courses if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Such circumstances include (but are not limited to) industrial action, lack of demand, departure of key staff, changes in legislation or government policy including changes, if any, resulting from the UK departing the European Union, withdrawal or reduction of funding or other circumstances beyond the University’s reasonable control.
  3. If the University discontinues any courses, it will use its best endeavours to provide a suitable alternative course. In addition, courses may change during the course of study and in such circumstances the University will normally undertake a consultation process prior to any such changes being introduced and seek to ensure that no student is unreasonably prejudiced as a consequence of any such change.
  4. The University does not accept responsibility (other than through the negligence of the University, its staff or agents), for the consequences of any modification or cancellation of any course, or part of a course, offered by the University but will take into consideration the effects on individual students and seek to minimise the impact of such effects where reasonably practicable.
  5. The University cannot accept any liability for disruption to its provision of educational or other services caused by circumstances beyond its control, but the University will take all reasonable steps to minimise the resultant disruption to such services.