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Overview

Accredited therapy training, practice-relevant research methodolgies, and the application of mental health theory across the lifespan.

Summary

The programme provides an opportunity for students to enhance their skills and knowledge in areas of applied psychology related to mental health practice and research. It trains and equips students wishing to:

  • Enter further professional training in Clinical, Counselling, Educational or Forensic Psychology;
  • Become more employable for positions in the public and private sector (such as Assistant/ Associate Psychologist posts, Research Assistant/Analyst post);
  • Pursue PhD research in the area of mental health.

In addition, the course has gained full BPS accreditation for Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner (PWP) training. This can be taken as one of the routes within the MSc programme.

The MSc Applied Psychology programme was shortlisted for three consecutive years as the gradireland 'Postgraduate Course of the Year'.

*Please note: This MSc programme is the same MSc Applied Psychology programme that was taught on the Magee campus of the University - it has now moved to the Coleraine campus.

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About this course

In this section

About

The comprehensive syllabus of this MSc programme provides an opportunity for students to enhance their skills and competencies in areas required by all professional psychologists. This includes an exploration of the professional issues encountered in practice, the advanced research methods employed by scientist practitioners, and the techniques and theory associated with psychological assessment, formulation and intervention. The course also provides an in-depth consideration of psychological theory and research concerned with the aetiology, assessment and treatment of psychological problems across the lifespan.

Students are provided with a comprehensive knowledge of some of the major psychological therapies, (namely Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, and Family Therapy and Systemic Practice), and gain practical experience in their use - through live role play and video analysis in the School's skills labs, and experiential group work within lectures. On the PWP training route within the programme, students will have the opportunity to put these skills into practice within a clinical placement.

In addition, students undertake a Masters level research project, taking the study from inception and ethical approval, through to data collection, analysis, and writing up for publication. As the course is taught by both experienced researchers and practising clinicians, there is also excellent opportunity to enhance knowledge and skills that will be invaluable for applications and CVs, as well as gaining experience in interview techniques for further professional training and jobs in the field.

Finally, the MSc presents a further placement opportunity for students who have completed the course, in the form of a 15-credit standalone placement module ('Clinical Placement in Applied Psychology'). A selection of clinical placements have been secured in Psychology Services in the local Western Health and Social Care Trust, in specialisms including Adult Mental Health, Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Paediatric Psychology, Older Adults, Personality Disorder, and Autism Spectrum Disorder Services. Students who enrol on this post-MSc module will be working as the equivalent of Assistant Psychologists on a voluntary basis in these services, providing valuable work experience to draw upon when applying for posts or further training in professional applied psychology.

Structure & content

To complete the Masters programme, students are required to successfully complete 180 university credits. Programme Routes: There are two different ‘routes’ that you can take during your time on the programme, depending on your interest or the experience you would like to gain from your training. These routes have been designed based on feedback from students, which has suggested that some people like to maintain a broad range of skills and experience, whereas others prefer to focus on a particular area of practice. The route you choose may depend on the kind of work or further training that you want to pursue beyond the MSc course itself (note that both routes include the carrying out of an MSc Research Project):

  • The ‘Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner’ route – This route incorporates training as a Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner (PWP), which is fully accredited by the British Psychological Society. PWPs work in primary care mental health services, delivering low intensity psychological interventions (with a CBT focus) for people experiencing mild to moderate emotional problems such as depression and anxiety. This is a well-established role in mental health services in England, and services in Northern Ireland are developing to include a focus on this way of working. Students taking this route will spend time on clinical placement during the course, arranged by the course team (more on this below).
  • The main course route, entitled ‘Mental Health and Psychological Therapies’ – This route offers a breadth of experience in theory and skills training, including Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and Family Therapy & Systemic Practice skills modules, Advanced Research Methods, and a choice amongst key Mental Health and Professional Issues modules.

Route Availability

Full-time students will be able to enrol on either of the routes on the course (pending any selection procedures). Part-time students will be able to enrol on the main course route - unfortunately, part-time students cannot enrol on the PWP route, due to the structure of the training.

Route 1: There are a limited number of places on the PWP route, because of the limited number of clinical placements available. Therefore, the course team will be holding interviews for those interested in undertaking this route through the course. Please note:Due to the placement attached to the PWP training, and the supervision provided, there is an increased fee for the modules (worth 75 credits) associated with this training (other modules on the MSc course are charged at the standard rate) - more information on this can be found in the 'Additional Mandatory Costs' section of this prospectus entry.

Route 2: The main course route is open to all applicants.

Post-MSc Clinical Placement:For anyone interested in undertaking the 'Clinical Placement in Applied Psychology' (15-credit standalone placement module that takes place after the course), students enrolled on the programme will be given the opportunity to apply for this as they approach the end of their taught modules in Semester 2. Spaces on this module are limited by the number of placements available, and students will be interviewed before undertaking the module.

Attendance

DurationOne year full-time

Mode of Attendance Depending on the route taken, there will be a slight variation in the days that students will be on campus or on placement:

  • PWP students will attend class on Wednesdays and Thursdays in Semester 1, and then Wednesdays and Thursdays in Semester 2. In addition, students will be required to spend two days per week in their placement context throughout the academic year.
  • Students on the main course route (‘Mental Health and Psychological Therapies’) will attend on Wednesdays and Thursdays in Semester 1, and Wednesdays and Thursdays in Semester 2.

Skills Block: All students will attend an initial skills block at the start of the programme – students on all routes will attend for 4 days of this block; PWP students also attend on the fifth day. Classes will then commence the following week, on the days outlined above.

Start time and finish time on taught days:

Each taught day will commence at 9:15am and run until 5:00pm. This applies to the days during the skills block and the days throughout each semester.

Start time and finish time on placement days:

If you are undertaking a placement of any kind, then these days should be treated as full days in a professional work context.

Please note that, while unlikely, these details are subject to change.

Start dates

  • September 2020
How to apply

Teaching, Learning and Assessment

The modules on the programme are delivered through a combination of lectures, workshops, practical skills training, and student-led seminars. There is a strong emphasis on experiential learning and skills analysis. Assessment methods vary across the modules, dependent on their focus - students will undertake a selection of written assignments (essays, reflective commentaries, research reports) and assessed role-plays of clinical skills, as well as a smaller number of written examinations. All students will complete the MSc Research Project over the duration of their time on the programme.

Content

The content for each course is summarised on the relevant course page, along with an overview of the modules that make up the course.

Each course is approved by the University and meets the expectations of:

  • the relevant generic national Qualification Descriptor
  • the applicable Subject Benchmark Statement
  • the requirements of any professional, regulatory, statutory and accrediting bodies.

Attendance and Independent Study

As part of your course induction, you will be provided with details of the organisation and management of the course, including attendance and assessment requirements - usually in the form of a timetable. For full-time courses, the precise timetable for each semester is not confirmed until close to the start date and may be subject to some change in the early weeks as all courses settle into their planned patterns. For part-time courses which require attendance on particular days and times, an expectation of the days and periods of attendance will be included in the letter of offer. A course handbook is also made available.

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Courses comprise modules for which the notional effort involved is indicated by its credit rating. Each credit point represents 10 hours of student effort. Undergraduate courses typically contain 10- or 20-credit modules (more usually 20) and postgraduate course typically 15- or 30-credit modules.

The normal study load expectation for an undergraduate full-time course of study in the standard academic year is 120 credit points. This amounts to around 36-42 hours of expected teaching and learning per week, inclusive of attendance requirements for lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical work, fieldwork or other scheduled classes, private study, and assessment. Part-time study load is the same as full-time pro-rata, with each credit point representing 10 hours of student effort.

Postgraduate Master’s courses typically comprise 180 credits, taken in three semesters when studied full-time. A Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) comprises 60 credits and can usually be completed on a part-time basis in one year. A 120-credit Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) can usually be completed on a part-time basis in two years.

Class contact times vary by course and type of module. Typically, for a module predominantly delivered through lectures you can expect at least 3 contact hours per week (lectures/seminars/tutorials). Laboratory classes often require a greater intensity of attendance in blocks. Some modules may combine lecture and laboratory. The precise model will depend on the course you apply for and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. Prospective students will be consulted about any significant changes.

Assessment

Assessment methods vary and are defined explicitly in each module. Assessment can be a combination of examination and coursework but may also be only one of these methods. Assessment is designed to assess your achievement of the module’s stated learning outcomes. You can expect to receive timely feedback on all coursework assessment. The precise assessment will depend on the module and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

Coursework can take many forms, for example: essay, report, seminar paper, test, presentation, dissertation, design, artefacts, portfolio, journal, group work. The precise form and combination of assessment will depend on the course you apply for and the module. Details will be made available in advance through induction, the course handbook, the module specification and the assessment timetable. The details are subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

Normally, a module will have 4 learning outcomes, and no more than 2 items of assessment. An item of assessment can comprise more than one task. The notional workload and the equivalence across types of assessment is standardised.

Calculation of the Final Award

The class of Honours awarded in Bachelor’s degrees is usually determined by calculation of an aggregate mark based on performance across the modules at Levels 5 and 6, (which correspond to the second and third year of full-time attendance).

Level 6 modules contribute 70% of the aggregate mark and Level 5 contributes 30% to the calculation of the class of the award. Classification of integrated Master’s degrees with Honours include a Level 7 component. The calculation in this case is: 50% Level 7, 30% Level 6, 20% Level 5. At least half the Level 5 modules must be studied at the University for Level 5 to be included in the calculation of the class.

All other qualifications have an overall grade determined by results in modules from the final level of study. In Master’s degrees of more than 200 credit points the final 120 points usually determine the overall grading.

Academic profile

The University employs over 1,000 suitably qualified and experienced academic staff - 59% have PhDs in their subject field and many have professional body recognition.

Courses are taught by staff who are Professors (25%), Readers, Senior Lecturers (18%) or Lecturers (57%).

We require most academic staff to be qualified to teach in higher education: 82% hold either Postgraduate Certificates in Higher Education Practice or higher. Most academic staff (81%) are accredited fellows of the Higher Education Academy (HEA) - the university sector professional body for teaching and learning. Many academic and technical staff hold other professional body designations related to their subject or scholarly practice.

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The profiles of many academic staff can be found on the University’s departmental websites and give a detailed insight into the range of staffing and expertise. The precise staffing for a course will depend on the department(s) involved and the availability and management of staff. This is subject to change annually and is confirmed in the timetable issued at the start of the course.

Occasionally, teaching may be supplemented by suitably qualified part-time staff (usually qualified researchers) and specialist guest lecturers. In these cases, all staff are inducted, mostly through our staff development programme ‘First Steps to Teaching’. In some cases, usually for provision in one of our out-centres, Recognised University Teachers are involved, supported by the University in suitable professional development for teaching.

Figures correct for academic year 2019-2020.

Modules

Here is a guide to the subjects studied on this course.

Courses are continually reviewed to take advantage of new teaching approaches and developments in research, industry and the professions. Please be aware that modules may change for your year of entry. The exact modules available and their order may vary depending on course updates, staff availability, timetabling and student demand. Please contact the course team for the most up to date module list.

In this section

Year one

Advanced Research Methods in Applied Psychology

Year: 1

This module is designed to give students training in the advanced qualitative and quantitative research methods that are required for contemporary research in applied psychology. The major focus will be on research methods for mental health and health psychology. Quantitative and qualitative research methods will be covered. Important issues such as data collection and research ethics will also be discussed. Students will become familiar with a single set of data from the National Comorbidity Survey (NCS) (a population study of mental health disorders in the US). They will also have the opportunity to design a qualitative study and evaluate qualitative evidence.

Research Project

Year: 1

This module will provide students with the chance to develop a substantial piece of work of their own, enabling them to demonstrate their understanding and the application of advanced research methods to a practical research issue of relevance to applied psychology (in the areas of mental health/illness or effective mental health care practice) and at a level of scholarship appropriate to Masters level.

Professional Issues (with Community Engagement Project)

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module aims to introduce students to therapeutic and psychological practice that operates from an inclusive values base, which promotes recovery and recognises and respects diversity. It emphasises the need to respect and value individual differences in age, sexuality, disability, gender, spirituality, race and culture, as well as the need to account for physical and sensory difficulties people may experience in accessing services, and to make provision for supporting these difficulties. The module underlines a clinical responsibility to respond to people's needs sensitively with regard to all aspects of diversity, and to maintain a commitment to equal opportunities for all and encourage people's active participation in every aspect of care and treatment. The module also places an emphasis on promoting understanding of social inclusion, the complexity of people's health, social and occupational needs, and the services that can support people to recovery. It underlines the importance of recognising limitations to competence and role, and to direct people to resources appropriate to their needs. In addition, the module maintains an important focus on the role of supervision and reflective practice in applied psychology settings.

Child, Adolescent and Family Mental Health

Year: 1

This module is optional

Developing a broad based understanding and a thorough knowledge base in relation to commonly encountered psychological disorders and disabilities, their classification, aetiology and underlying processes, is recognised as being fundamental to the provision of effective and meaningful treatment interventions. This module considers issues relating to the aetiology and assessment of clinical presentations in childhood, and methods on intervention and prevention. It provides a theoretical background to practice in clinical settings for children.

Adult Mental Health

Year: 1

This module is optional

Developing a broad based understanding and a thorough knowledge base in relation to commonly encountered psychological disorders and disabilities, their classification, aetiology and underlying processes, is recognised as being fundamental to the provision of effective and meaningful treatment interventions. This module considers issues relating to the aetiology and assessment of clinical presentations in adulthood, and methods on intervention and prevention. It is intended to provide a theoretical background to practice in adult clinical settings.

Family Therapy and Systemic Practice 1

Year: 1

This module is optional

In this module students will be introduced to family therapy and systemic practice theories and will be able to understand how problems, mental ill health and distress may be explained through the lens of systemic thinking. The main models of structural, strategic and Milan theories, along with their historical development will be explored. The process of systemic psychotherapy will be explained with opportunity to practice a systemic assessment, hypothesising and use the relevant intervention techniques, with example case studies. Issues relating to culture, the therapeutic relationship, power and gender in systemic practice will be discussed, along with case examples of how family therapy and systemic practice can be applied in various clinical settings.

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module aims to develop a knowledge and understanding of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) and the skills necessary for its effective application. It will also develop student's psychotherapeutic skills in order to aid application of CBT techniques and strategies. On completion of this module, students (via role play case vignette work) will have a sound understanding and some skill development on psychological assessment and engagement, understand the concepts of mental health and mental illness, diagnostic category systems in mental health, and a range of social, medical and psychological explanatory models. Within this broader context and in the specific framework of a stepped care model, the module will equip the student with the skills to recognise appropriate symptomology, understand how to engage a client in a positive therapeutic alliance and assist in making informed choices about their treatment. This will be done while acknowledging appropriate risks and managing them appropriately. Finally the module aims to provide students with an extended understanding of the cognitive model, how to move from assessment to cognitive model formulations/conceptualisations regarding not only mild/moderate mental health presentations (step care 1-3), but also some more high intensity presentations, as a way of making comparisons across the step care model.

Family Therapy and Systemic Practice 2

Year: 1

This module is optional

In this module students will be introduced to family therapy and systemic practice theories and will be able to understand how problems, mental ill health and distress may be explained through the lens of systemic thinking. The main models of structural, strategic and Milan theories will be reinforced, and key practice-related issues will be explored. The process of systemic psychotherapy will be explained with opportunity to practice systemic skills and use the relevant intervention techniques, with example case studies. Issues relating to bereavement, domestic abuse, and child-focused practice will be discussed, along with case examples of how family therapy and systemic practice can be applied in various clinical settings.

Psychological Assessment and Engagement (with Placement)

Year: 1

This module is optional

The Psychological Assessment and Engagement Module assists the student to understand the concepts of mental health and mental illness, diagnostic category systems in mental health, and a range of social, medical and psychological explanatory models. Within this broader context and in the specific framework of a stepped care model, the module will equip the student with the skills to recognise appropriate symptomology, engage the client in a positive therapeutic alliance and assist them in making informed choices about their treatment. This will be done while acknowledging risks and managing them appropriately.

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (Low Intensity) for Common Mental Health Problems (with Placement)

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module aims to support the student to gain advanced understanding, knowledge and competence (yet critical knowledge) of evidenced based low intensity CBT for common mental health problems, at step care level 2/3. The module will focus more so on the use of CBT interventions for depression and anxiety disorders, but will also consider the use of internet and self-guided resources, as well as psychopharmacological interventions. At all times, the module aims to prepare and consolidate the student's knowledge on when/where and how to refer clients for more intensive therapies, in addition to being aware of continual risk assessment and monitoring of clients welfare. This module forms part of the BPS qualification to become a Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner, providing evidenced based psychological interventions for common mental health problems.

Professional Issues for Practitioners

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module aims to introduce students to therapeutic and psychological practice that operates from an inclusive values base, which promotes recovery and recognises and respects diversity. It emphasises the need to respect and value individual differences in age, sexuality, disability, gender, spirituality, race and culture, as well as the need to account for physical and sensory difficulties people may experience in accessing services, and to make provision for supporting these difficulties. The module underlines a clinical responsibility to respond to people's needs sensitively with regard to all aspects of diversity, and to maintain a commitment to equal opportunities for all and encourage people's active participation in every aspect of care and treatment. The module also places an emphasis on promoting understanding of social inclusion, the complexity of people's health, social and occupational needs, and the services that can support people to recovery. It underlines the importance of recognising limitations to competence and role, and to direct people to resources appropriate to their needs. In addition, the module maintains an important focus on the role of supervision and reflective practice in applied psychology settings.

Values, Diversity and Context (with Placement)

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module aims to equip students to practice from an inclusive values base, which promotes recovery and recognises and respects diversity. It emphasises the need to respect and value individual differences in age, sexuality, disability, gender, spirituality, race and culture, as well as the need to account for physical and sensory difficulties people may experience in accessing services, and to make provision in their work to mitigate these. The module underlines a clinical responsibility to respond to people's needs sensitively with regard to all aspects of diversity, and to maintain a commitment to equal opportunities for all and encourage people's active participation in every aspect of care and treatment. The module also underlines the importance of managing client caseloads, operating safely and to high standards, and using supervision to aid in clinical decision-making. It highlights the need to recognise limitations to competence and role, and to direct people to resources appropriate to their needs. In addition, the module maintains an important focus on social inclusion - including return to work and meaningful activity or other occupational activities - as well as clinical improvement. There is therefore an emphasis on promoting understanding of the complexity of people's health, social and occupational needs and the services which can support people to recovery.

Entry conditions

We recognise a range of qualifications for admission to our courses. In addition to the specific entry conditions for this course you must also meet the University’s General Entrance Requirements.

In this section

Entry Requirements

Applicants must hold at least a 2:1 degree in Psychology, which confers eligibility for the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership with the British Psychological Society (BPS) or the Psychological Society of Ireland (PSI).

Those with a 2:2 are welcome to apply, but preference will be given to those who have some additional relevant clinical experience to add to their CV.

All applicants, regardless of qualifications, are advised to use the space provided in the personal statement/additional information section of the online application process, to detail any experience that may be relevant to studying an MSc in Applied Psychology.

For those students interested in undertaking Route 1 on the programme (Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner), you will be selected through an interview process - this interview specifically determines entry to Route 1, and does not affect the offer of a place on the MSc.

Other Qualifications

Only those with a primary degree in Psychology are eligible to apply. However, if you have a degree in another discipline, and feel strongly about making a career change into Psychology, you can apply to the British Psychological Society to undertake a Conversion Course in Psychology, which then gives you eligibility for Chartered Membership in the future. If you have successfully completed the conversion course, your application for entry to this programme will then be considered.

English Language Requirements

English language requirements for international applicants
The minimum requirement for this course is Academic IELTS 6.0 with no band score less than 5.5. Trinity ISE: Pass at level III also meets this requirement for Tier 4 visa purposes.

Ulster recognises a number of other English language tests and comparable IELTS equivalent scores.

Exemptions and transferability

Those who have already undertaken professional postgraduate training in Family Therapy and Systemic Practice or CBT may be exempt from undertaking the modules related to these therapeutic methods.

Those who have attained a PhD may be exempt from the Advanced Research Methods module.

Applicants in either of the above situations can enquire about Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL) at the time of applying.

Careers & opportunities

In this section

Career options

Currently, our graduating students are successful in acquiring Assistant Psychologist positions, which with experience is allowing people to apply for Associate Psychologist positions. Others are successful in gaining entry onto Professional Doctorate programmes in Clinical, Counselling and Educational Psychology. Our graduates also secure posts in research and PhD scholarships in Psychology across the UK and Ireland. In addition, students who undertake the accredited Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner (PWP) training strand within the course will be able to seek accreditation with the BPS for working as a PWP.

Work placement / study abroad

The programme has a number of opportunities to connect clinical placement experiences with studies on campus. The BPS-accredited Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner Training (which forms a part of one of the course routes), includes a 9-month clinical placement in low-intensity psychological therapies services, arranged by the course team. In addition, the MSc presents a further placement opportunity for students who have completed the course, in the form of a 15-credit standalone placement module ('Clinical Placement in Applied Psychology'). A selection of clinical placements have been secured in Psychology Services in the Western Health and Social Care Trust, in specialisms including Adult Mental Health, Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Paediatric Psychology, Older Adults, Personality Disorder, and Autism Spectrum Disorder Services. This post-MSc module is only open to those students who have completed the MSc at Ulster, and students who enrol on this module will be working as the equivalent of Assistant Psychologists on a voluntary basis in these services (length of placements are typically between 6 months and one year).

Professional recognition

British Psychological Society (BPS)

Accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS) against the requirements for qualification as a Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner.

Apply

How to apply Request a prospectus

Applications to our postgraduate courses are made through the University’s online application system.

The closing date for applications is the 31st May.

Please note that, when you apply for the course, you will be contacted by Admissions Coleraine regarding the supporting documentation that you need to provide.

Start dates

  • September 2020

Fees and funding

In this section

Additional mandatory costs

'Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner' Route:

In addition to the course fee for the MSc programme, those students undertaking the 'Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner' Route will be required to pay an additional fee for the specific MSc modules associated with this accredited training. For the 2019/20 academic year, this equates to £587 in addition to the fee for the MSc (for NI/GB/EU applicants - international fees may vary).

Access NI check (£33 at time of writing); Graduate Membership of British Psychological Society (2019 fee of £57-88, dependent on income and when BSc was completed); Professional Indemnity Insurance ('Student level' – e.g. £60 for one year for BPS members living in UK); Travel Expenses associated with placement, for two days per week on placement in Semester 1, two days per week on placement in Semester 2, and possible placement time during the summer months (the expenses associated with this can vary, depending on the location of placement – where possible, student placements are allocated close to students’ place of residence).

‘Mental Health and Psychological Therapies’ Route:

There are no additional expenses/costs associated with this route.

Tuition fees and costs associated with accommodation, travel (including car parking charges), and normal living are a part of university life.

Where a course has additional mandatory expenses we make every effort to highlight them. These may include residential visits, field trips, materials (e.g. art, design, engineering) inoculations, security checks, computer equipment, uniforms, professional memberships etc.

We aim to provide students with the learning materials needed to support their studies. Our libraries are a valuable resource with an extensive collection of books and journals as well as first-class facilities and IT equipment. Computer suites and free wifi is also available on each of the campuses.

There will be some additional costs to being a student which cannot be itemised and these will be different for each student. You may choose to purchase your own textbooks and course materials or prefer your own computer and software. Printing and binding may also be required. There are additional fees for graduation ceremonies, examination resits and library fines. Additional costs vary from course to course.

Students choosing a period of paid work placement or study abroad as part of their course should be aware that there may be additional travel and living costs as well as tuition fees.

Please contact the course team for more information.

Contact

Admissions Services

T: +44 (0)28 70123210

E: admissionsmg@ulster.ac.uk

Admissions Support - Jacqui Neill

T: +44 (0)28 70123271

E: j.neill@ulster.ac.uk

International Admissions Office

E: internationaladmissions@ulster.ac.uk

For more information visit

Faculty of Life and Health Sciences

School of Psychology

Disclaimer

  1. The University endeavours to deliver courses and programmes of study in accordance with the description set out in this prospectus. The University’s prospectus is produced at the earliest possible date in order to provide maximum assistance to individuals considering applying for a course of study offered by the University. The University makes every effort to ensure that the information contained in the prospectus is accurate but it is possible that some changes will occur between the date of printing and the start of the academic year to which it relates. Please note that the University’s website is the most up-to-date source of information regarding courses and facilities and we strongly recommend that you always visit the website before making any commitments.
  2. Although reasonable steps are taken to provide the programmes and services described, the University cannot guarantee the provision of any course or facility and the University may make variations to the contents or methods of delivery of courses, discontinue, merge or combine courses and introduce new courses if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Such circumstances include (but are not limited to) industrial action, lack of demand, departure of key staff, changes in legislation or government policy including changes, if any, resulting from the UK departing the European Union, withdrawal or reduction of funding or other circumstances beyond the University’s reasonable control.
  3. If the University discontinues any courses, it will use its best endeavours to provide a suitable alternative course. In addition, courses may change during the course of study and in such circumstances the University will normally undertake a consultation process prior to any such changes being introduced and seek to ensure that no student is unreasonably prejudiced as a consequence of any such change.
  4. The University does not accept responsibility (other than through the negligence of the University, its staff or agents), for the consequences of any modification or cancellation of any course, or part of a course, offered by the University but will take into consideration the effects on individual students and seek to minimise the impact of such effects where reasonably practicable.
  5. The University cannot accept any liability for disruption to its provision of educational or other services caused by circumstances beyond its control, but the University will take all reasonable steps to minimise the resultant disruption to such services.

Testimonials

"The MSc Applied Psychology course has excellent content, logically timed and presented to the highest standard. The support for learning and also for personal life experiences in psychology is unbelievable and there is always a sense of belonging. The course team encourage us to do our best and help us to achieve this through all aspects of our professional lives" (Marie Robb, Graduate of the MSc Applied Psychology programme).

In two out of the past four years, the MSc programme has been nominated by the students and by the Students Union as 'Ulster Team of the Year', as part of the Ulster University Students Union Learning and Teaching Awards. From multiple nominations across the University campuses, the MSc programme team was awarded as the runner-up in this category on both occasions.

The MSc programme has also been shortlisted for the gradIreland 'Postgraduate Course of the Year' for three consecutive years.