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Advancing Practice
PgCert/PgDip/MSc

2020/21 Part-time Postgraduate course

Award:

Postgraduate Certificate/Postgraduate Diploma/Master of Science

Faculty:

Faculty of Life and Health Sciences

School:

School of Health Sciences

Campus:

Jordanstown campus

Start dates:

September 2020

January 2021

Overview

The School of Health Sciences aims to provide quality advanced education for Allied Health Professionals to enhance their skills in client care.

Summary

The School of Health Sciences aims to provide quality education for both the current and future healthcare workforce thereby improving the experience for people and their families who may now, and in the future, require help from Allied Health Professionals (AHPs).

We provide programmes of study and research opportunities by a diversity of means.This course offers Continual Professional Development (CPD) for AHPs.

The School’s innovative and highly reputable CPD provision responds to the needs of all stages of the UK and Ireland’s AHP career frameworks. Our postgraduate programme enables AHPs to focus on their chosen specialism (diagnostic radiography, occupational therapy, physiotherapy, podiatry, speech and language therapy, therapeutic radiography).

The content of the course is directly relevant to AHPs working in an ever-developing workforce. The material is produced and delivered by teaching staff, national and international experts in the subject areas.

The masters programme has been produced with clearly identified, efficient, processes for applicants to engage with short courses, and to facilitate students to move on to award programmes, using flexible but clear module opportunities to build up to the Postgraduate Certificate/Postgraduate Diploma/Masters awards.


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About this course

About

Structure

This course is designed to enable students to undertake a Postgraduate Certificate/Diploma/MSc: a student initially registers for a Postgraduate Certificate and on completion of this may either exit with the award or progress to Diploma level. On completion of the Diploma they may choose to exit or transfer to the Masters level. Please also note that there are compulsory modules associated with the Postgraduate Diploma and Masters and that awards should normally be completed within 5 years.

Modules may also be taken as stand alone i.e. without registration for an award.

Compulsory modules and course

MSc

Project (60 points)

Postgraduate Diploma

Additional 60 credit points

To exit with Diploma:

One compulsory module (15 points each) - research evidence for health science

If progressing on to MSc level:

Must also take research project preparation (15 points) in addition to those above

Postgraduate Certificate

Free selection of modules from course list up to 60 credit points.

Attendance

The part-time MSc programme is normally six semesters completed over 2-4 academic years. However students may opt to exit with a Postgraduate Certificate (60 credit points) after 1-2 years or a Postgraduate Diploma (120 points) after 2-3 years. In order to facilitate student attendance many of the modules involve on average 3-6 days attendance per module, these may be delivered in one block or in two shorter blocks of attendance during the semester. Some modules may require longer attendance due to professional body requirements and/or HCPC regulations. Each module coordinator will be able to advise on the expected attendance. Several modules are taught through the online environment and where these modules do not require attendance, students are expected to regularly participate in the online learning environment.

Start dates

  • September 2020
  • January 2021

Teaching, Learning and Assessment

The content for each course is summarised on the relevant course page, along with an overview of the modules that make up the course.

Each course is approved by the University and meets the expectations of:

- the relevant generic national Qualification Descriptor

- the applicable Subject Benchmark Statement

- the requirements of any professional, regulatory, statutory and accrediting bodies.

Attendance and Independent Study

As part of your course induction, you will be provided with details of the organisation and management of the course, including attendance and assessment requirements - usually in the form of a timetable. For full-time courses, the precise timetable for each semester is not confirmed until close to the start date and may be subject to some change in the early weeks as all courses settle into their planned patterns. For part-time courses which require attendance on particular days and times, an expectation of the days and periods of attendance will be included in the letter of offer. A course handbook is also made available.

Courses comprise modules for which the notional effort involved is indicated by its credit rating. Each credit point represents 10 hours of student effort. Undergraduate courses typically contain 10- or 20-credit modules (more usually 20) and postgraduate course typically 15- or 30-credit modules.

The normal study load expectation for an undergraduate full-time course of study in the standard academic year is 120 credit points. This amounts to around 36-42 hours of expected teaching and learning per week, inclusive of attendance requirements for lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical work, fieldwork or other scheduled classes, private study, and assessment. Part-time study load is the same as full-time pro-rata, with each credit point representing 10 hours of student effort.

Postgraduate Master’s courses typically comprise 180 credits, taken in three semesters when studied full-time. A Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) comprises 60 credits and can usually be completed on a part-time basis in one year. A 120-credit Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) can usually be completed on a part-time basis in two years.

Class contact times vary by course and type of module. Typically, for a module predominantly delivered through lectures you can expect at least 3 contact hours per week (lectures/seminars/tutorials). Laboratory classes often require a greater intensity of attendance in blocks. Some modules may combine lecture and laboratory. The precise model will depend on the course you apply for and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. Prospective students will be consulted about any significant changes.

Assessment

Assessment methods vary and are defined explicitly in each module. Assessment can be a combination of examination and coursework but may also be only one of these methods. Assessment is designed to assess your achievement of the module’s stated learning outcomes. You can expect to receive timely feedback on all coursework assessment. The precise assessment will depend on the module and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

Coursework can take many forms, for example: essay, report, seminar paper, test, presentation, dissertation, design, artefacts, portfolio, journal, group work. The precise form and combination of assessment will depend on the course you apply for and the module. Details will be made available in advance through induction, the course handbook, the module specification and the assessment timetable. The details are subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

Normally, a module will have 4 learning outcomes, and no more than 2 items of assessment. An item of assessment can comprise more than one task. The notional workload and the equivalence across types of assessment is standardised.

Calculation of the Final Award

The class of Honours awarded in Bachelor’s degrees is usually determined by calculation of an aggregate mark based on performance across the modules at Levels 5 and 6, (which correspond to the second and third year of full-time attendance).

Level 6 modules contribute 70% of the aggregate mark and Level 5 contributes 30% to the calculation of the class of the award. Classification of integrated Master’s degrees with Honours include a Level 7 component. The calculation in this case is: 50% Level 7, 30% Level 6, 20% Level 5. At least half the Level 5 modules must be studied at the University for Level 5 to be included in the calculation of the class.

All other qualifications have an overall grade determined by results in modules from the final level of study. In Master’s degrees of more than 200 credit points the final 120 points usually determine the overall grading.

This is carrried out through a variety of methods and will depend on the individual module studied.

Learning is both classroom based and online via discussion boards, blogs, video conferencing and podcasts.

Methods of assessment include case studies, class tests, computer based assessments, log books, practicals, online tasks and reflective accounts.

  • Read more

    Content

    The content for each course is summarised on the relevant course page, along with an overview of the modules that make up the course.

    Each course is approved by the University and meets the expectations of:

    • the relevant generic national Qualification Descriptor
    • the applicable Subject Benchmark Statement
    • the requirements of any professional, regulatory, statutory and accrediting bodies.

    Attendance and Independent Study

    As part of your course induction, you will be provided with details of the organisation and management of the course, including attendance and assessment requirements - usually in the form of a timetable. For full-time courses, the precise timetable for each semester is not confirmed until close to the start date and may be subject to some change in the early weeks as all courses settle into their planned patterns. For part-time courses which require attendance on particular days and times, an expectation of the days and periods of attendance will be included in the letter of offer. A course handbook is also made available.

    Courses comprise modules for which the notional effort involved is indicated by its credit rating. Each credit point represents 10 hours of student effort. Undergraduate courses typically contain 10- or 20-credit modules (more usually 20) and postgraduate course typically 15- or 30-credit modules.

    The normal study load expectation for an undergraduate full-time course of study in the standard academic year is 120 credit points. This amounts to around 36-42 hours of expected teaching and learning per week, inclusive of attendance requirements for lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical work, fieldwork or other scheduled classes, private study, and assessment. Part-time study load is the same as full-time pro-rata, with each credit point representing 10 hours of student effort.

    Postgraduate Master’s courses typically comprise 180 credits, taken in three semesters when studied full-time. A Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) comprises 60 credits and can usually be completed on a part-time basis in one year. A 120-credit Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) can usually be completed on a part-time basis in two years.

    Class contact times vary by course and type of module. Typically, for a module predominantly delivered through lectures you can expect at least 3 contact hours per week (lectures/seminars/tutorials). Laboratory classes often require a greater intensity of attendance in blocks. Some modules may combine lecture and laboratory. The precise model will depend on the course you apply for and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. Prospective students will be consulted about any significant changes.

    Assessment

    Assessment methods vary and are defined explicitly in each module. Assessment can be a combination of examination and coursework but may also be only one of these methods. Assessment is designed to assess your achievement of the module’s stated learning outcomes. You can expect to receive timely feedback on all coursework assessment. The precise assessment will depend on the module and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

    Coursework can take many forms, for example: essay, report, seminar paper, test, presentation, dissertation, design, artefacts, portfolio, journal, group work. The precise form and combination of assessment will depend on the course you apply for and the module. Details will be made available in advance through induction, the course handbook, the module specification and the assessment timetable. The details are subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

    Normally, a module will have 4 learning outcomes, and no more than 2 items of assessment. An item of assessment can comprise more than one task. The notional workload and the equivalence across types of assessment is standardised.

    Calculation of the Final Award

    The class of Honours awarded in Bachelor’s degrees is usually determined by calculation of an aggregate mark based on performance across the modules at Levels 5 and 6, (which correspond to the second and third year of full-time attendance).

    Level 6 modules contribute 70% of the aggregate mark and Level 5 contributes 30% to the calculation of the class of the award. Classification of integrated Master’s degrees with Honours include a Level 7 component. The calculation in this case is: 50% Level 7, 30% Level 6, 20% Level 5. At least half the Level 5 modules must be studied at the University for Level 5 to be included in the calculation of the class.

    All other qualifications have an overall grade determined by results in modules from the final level of study. In Master’s degrees of more than 200 credit points the final 120 points usually determine the overall grading.

Academic profile

The University employs over 1,000 suitably qualified and experienced academic staff - 59% have PhDs in their subject field and many have professional body recognition.

Courses are taught by staff who are Professors (25%), Readers, Senior Lecturers (18%) or Lecturers (57%).

We require most academic staff to be qualified to teach in higher education: 82% hold either Postgraduate Certificates in Higher Education Practice or higher. Most academic staff (81%) are accredited fellows of the Higher Education Academy (HEA) - the university sector professional body for teaching and learning. Many academic and technical staff hold other professional body designations related to their subject or scholarly practice.

  • Read more

    The profiles of many academic staff can be found on the University’s departmental websites and give a detailed insight into the range of staffing and expertise. The precise staffing for a course will depend on the department(s) involved and the availability and management of staff. This is subject to change annually and is confirmed in the timetable issued at the start of the course.

    Occasionally, teaching may be supplemented by suitably qualified part-time staff (usually qualified researchers) and specialist guest lecturers. In these cases, all staff are inducted, mostly through our staff development programme ‘First Steps to Teaching’. In some cases, usually for provision in one of our out-centres, Recognised University Teachers are involved, supported by the University in suitable professional development for teaching.

    Figures correct for academic year 2019-2020.

Jordanstown campus

The largest of Ulster's campuses.


Accommodation

Jordanstown is our biggest campus in an idyllic setting surrounded by lush lawns and trees. It's just a few hundred metres from Loughshore Park and promenade, and just seven miles from Belfast city centre.

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Sports Facilities

At our Jordanstown Campus we have world class facilities that are open all year round to our students and members of the public.

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Student support

At Student Support we provide many services to help students through their time at Ulster University.

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Jordanstown campus location info

  Find out more about our Jordanstown campus

Address

Ulster University
Shore Road
Newtownabbey
Co. Antrim
BT37 0QB

T: 028 7012 3456

Modules

Here is a guide to the subjects studied on this course.

Courses are continually reviewed to take advantage of new teaching approaches and developments in research, industry and the professions. Please be aware that modules may change for your year of entry. The exact modules available and their order may vary depending on course updates, staff availability, timetabling and student demand. Please contact the course team for the most up to date module list.

In this section

Year one

Research Project Preparation

Year: 1

The aim of the module is to develop research design skills to enable students to produce a working research proposal for the Masters project.

Research Evidence in Health Science

Year: 1

This 15 credit point, online module runs twice per academic year and offers health professionals an opportunity to develop their understanding of a range of research methodologies commonly used within healthcare. They will use this understanding of clinical research methods to develop skills in critically appraising and synthesising literature in order to inform and advance the quality of care and service delivery. For those students proceeding to the Masters award, the module will complement the 'Preparation for Project' module and provide a foundation for the Masters project.

Research Project

Year: 1

The aim of this project module is to engage the student in an independent piece of research activity under the guidance of a supervisor from the School of Health Sciences. It is expected that this research will add to the student's knowledge and perhaps inform future teaching, clinical practice or further research. The research activity will be allied to that carried out in the Centre for Health and Rehabilitation Technologies (CHaRT) within the Institute for Nursing and Health Research (INHR).

Modern Cancer Care Management: Pathology and treatment applied to therapists

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module will deliver and review the modern cancer care management agenda. It will explore the prevention, epidemiology, pathogenesis and treatment of common cancers and evaluate the role of therapists in cancer integrated care pathways.

Symptom Management in Palliative care

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module will enable students to critically analyse and synthesis knowledge and theory with the application of their professional skills to enhance their clinical reasoning skills in the management of complex problems in relation to palliative care for people with long term conditions.

12 lead Electrocardiography interpretation for the health professional

Year: 1

This module is optional

This research informed, evidence based module provides the underpinning knowledge to analyse, interpret and diagnosis of a range of cardiac rhythm conditions.

Clinical Practice of Ultrasound Imaging in Cardiac Disease

Year: 1

This module is optional

The aims of this module are to develop the theoretical knowledge and practical skills required to perform cardiac ultrasound, analyse data obtained and interpret indices for a range of cardiac conditions.

Implantable Device Management in Cardiology

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module underpins Cardiac Rhythm Management. It will provide trainees with the knowledge, understanding and practical skills to safely contribute to the diagnosis and treatment of patients with implanted cardiac devices and management of abnormalities of cardiac rhythm.

Foundations of Mental Health and Wellbeing

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module is aimed to at those individuals working to support people living with acute and also enduring mental health issues. This is a foundational model on key topics in mental health, including aetiology and strategies for the promotion, prevention, treatment and recovery of common mental health disorders.

Principles of Learning, Teaching and Assessment in Healthcare Practice

Year: 1

This module is optional

The purpose of this module is to enable you to develop your understanding and skills around learning and teaching in practice. The module will provide you with opportunity to construct professional knowledge about the fundamental principles of learning, teaching and assessing and directly impact upon how you use these skills to develop learning activities in your practice.

Entrepreneurial Leadership

Year: 1

This module is optional

The module seeks to build the student's awareness of "entrepreneurial leadership" and to provide a framework for engaging with and assessing the viability of an innovative project/new venture or the development of an existing one within the health and social care sector. It aims to give the student insights to the opportunities and challenges associated with establishing and managing the development of a new or existing venture, allowing them to audit their personal, entrepreneurial potential.

Professional Development in Practice

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module provides the opportunity for students to engage in professional development to enhance their working knowledge and application of effective learning, teaching and supervisory methods. This will develop their leadership skills in preparation for taking on a supervisory/mentoring role with students and junior staff in the future.

Re-ablement and Community Rehabilitation for Occupational Therapists

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module aims to advance participants' knowledge of key issues relating to re-ablement and rehabilitation of clients with a range of long term conditions. It is designed for those delivering re-ablement and community rehabilitation services who are responsible for the supervision of support workers in this area.

Yoga supporting health

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module is suitable for people working in healthcare who are interested to understand yoga as a healthcare intervention. The module will enhance knowledge and understanding of yoga, facilitate exploration of the evidence base emerging in western cultures and enable the participant to develop a personal practice. This is not a yoga teacher training module.

Facilitating Practice Based Learning

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module provides the opportunity for practitioners who undertake the role of practice educator, facilitating students' learning on practice placements, to develop their understanding of effective learning and teaching in practice settings. It enables participants to develop and enhance their skills in practice-based learning, teaching and assessment, to reflect critically on their own experience as a learner, a practitioner and an educator, and to identify aspects of their own practice that could be developed and/or improved.

Enhancing Learning and Teaching in the Practice Setting

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module provides the opportunity for practitioners who undertake an educational role, facilitating others' learning in the practice setting, to develop their understanding of effective learning and teaching. It enables participants to develop and enhance their skills in practice-based learning, teaching and assessment. It provides the opportunity for participants to reflect critically on their own experience as a learner, a practitioner and an educator, and to identify aspects of their own practice that could be developed and/or improved.

Seating and Postural Management for Complex Disability

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module gives the student the opportunity to enhance their clinical reasoning skills in determining the optimal seating and positioning strategies for clients with complex disability. It provides opportunities for participants to reflect critically on their own experience as a practitioner and the skills to complete a comprehensive client-centred seating and postural assessment.

Electronic Assistive Technology

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module will increase knowledge and understanding of the integration of commercially available information and communication technologies into health and social care. Consideration of the design, procurement, installation and maintenance of systems for a range of service users will be explored. From a practice perspective assessment tools, outcome measures and ethical aspects of service delivery will also be investigated.

Environmental Design

Year: 1

This module is optional

This 30 credit point module provides students with the knowledge, understanding, skills and abilities to safely and effectively contribute to the development of adaptations of the physical environment to supporting people in a community setting

Pressure Ulcer Prevention and Management for Occupational Therapists

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module provides an opportunity for participants to further their reflective practitioner skills. It also facilitates the development of expertise in completing thorough pressure ulcer assessments, understanding the underlying reasons for clinical presentation, and making competent evidence based decisions for client-centred interventions.

Wheelchair Mobility

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module assists the student to develop expertise in completing a comprehensive assessment, understanding the impact of various factors and legislation, and in making competent evidence-based decisions to achieve a client-centred wheelchair mobility solution. Additionally it provides the opportunity for students to further their reflective practitioner skills.

Sensory Integration I: Foundations and Neuroscience

Year: 1

This module is optional

Recent advances in neuroscience support the application of the theory of Sensory Integration (SI) as a treatment approach. It will be centred around the perspectives of people who live with sensory integration difficulties. It will equip students with the knowledge required to apply current theories to their everyday practice. It will provide therapists with a theoretical basis for the management of people with sensory processing disorders and will enable therapists to further enhance their skills in reviewing evidence to inform practice.

Sensory Integration 2: Clinical Reasoning in Sensory Integration: Assessment

Year: 1

This module is optional

Students will learn to synthesise, analyse and interpret assessment data and articulate clear reasoning related to their hypothesis of the sensory integration difficulty. They will learn key concepts of ASI, exploring the patterns of SI dysfunction, models of SI, principles and practice of assessment, clinical reasoning, synthesising the assessment data and the process of interpretation of assessment, drawing on a range of assessment tools.

Sensory Integration 3: Clinical Reasoning and Practice in Sensory Integration: Intervention

Year: 1

This module is optional

Sensory Integration 3 allows successful students to provide sensory integration interventions to people in a range of different settings and across the lifespan. Students will be able to negotiate and set appropriate goals, which reflect both the client's priorities and their sensory processing and integration needs.

By the end of Sensory Integration 3, students' knowledge and skills will cohere with those identified at practitioner level in the proposed International Council for Ayres Sensory Integration (ICEASI) framework, and will be entitled to use the title SI Practitioner, awarded by Sensory Integration Education.

Sensory Integration 4: Advanced Practice

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module will take clinicians forward from the interpretive skills they acquired in earlier modules, to enable clinicians to interact with advanced applied neuroscience, confidently disseminate and share their assessment and research findings with a wider audience, and be an agent of change understanding service-level system change methods.

Mindfulness Based Approaches to Health

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module provides health professionals the opportunity to explore mindfulness, gaining advanced knowledge and understanding for the delivery of evidence-based therapeutic intervention. Additionally, for use as a self-management tool in reducing work related stress and compassion fatigue.

Pharmacotherapeutics in Prescribing

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module provides the necessary pharmacological knowledge within the context of the underpinning pathophysiology that will enable the healthcare professional to prescribe safely, appropriately, and effectively within a collaborative health care team. It will be offered through a blended combination of e-learning, taught components and threaded discussion with supported group work. Assessment is by a combination of coursework and a synoptic examination.

Prescribing in Practice

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module will prepare Allied Health Professionals to undertake an active role in non medical prescribing within their specified area of practice. The legislative framework and professional and ethical principles, which underpin prescribing practice, are explored.

Vascular Disease and the Lower Limb

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module will provide clinicians with an advanced theoretical basis for the management of people with arterial and venous disorders that affect the lower limb. It is designed for clinicians with experience in the care and management of the patient with peripheral vascular disease and will facilitate clinicians to become suitably equipped to implement theory into practice and provide the scope required for those wishing to hold specialist posts.

Renal Disease and the Lower Limb

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module enables students to update and extend their knowledge of renal disease and the lower limb. It also allows students to appreciate the outcomes realized in patients with limb compromise due to renal disease are managed with a comprehensive approach integrating the efforts of the renal specialist team , as well as other members of a multi-disciplinary team. This training will produce clinicians who are suitably equipped to implement theory into practice and provide the scope required for those wishing to hold specialist posts.

Lower Limb Biomechanics: Current Concepts

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module will develop the students' awareness and understanding of current concepts in lower limb and foot biomechanics. Functional anatomy and the pathophysiology of pain will also be explored. Students' skills in the assessment of bone and soft tissue injury of the foot and lower limb will be developed and the relationship between injury and gait compensation mechanisms will be examined. Critical self-reflection of practice is an expectation of students at this level and this is reflected in the delivery and assessment of the module.

Rheumatological Disorders and the Lower Limb

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module will provide students, who have experience in the care and management of the patient with various Rheumatological disorders, with the specialist theoretical knowledge and clinical skills to assess the person with Rheumatological disorders of the lower limb. It will help students to identify and formulate care plans for this group of patients with emphasis on multidisciplinary teamwork and timely specialist referral.

Lower Limb Biomechanics: Clinical Practice

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module will provide the opportunity to discuss current clinical management principles and philosophy for professionals treating patients with biomechanical pathologies. The module will enable current management models to be analysed as well as allowing trends in research and clinical practice to be explored.

Wound Healing for Podiatrists

Year: 1

This module is optional

A working knowledge of wound healing is essential in modern clinical practice. This module will provide clinicians with an advanced theoretical basis which will enable them to provide high quality, cost effective wound care as this module will emphasise preventative and pro-active assessment and care of wounds specific to the foot and consider both the current and future trends in the care of these patients.

The Science of Wound Healing

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module will provide clinicians with an advanced theoretical basis which will enable them to understand and explore in greater depth some of the areas of the highly complex areas of the normal and abnormal wound healing processes.

Pathology and Management of Diabetic Foot

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module provides an examination of current evidence for the management and prevention of diabetic foot complications in the light of a growing body of literature of National and International Guidelines. Students' knowledge and skills in the assessment of the diabetic foot and lower limb will be developed and the relationships between the triad of diabetic foot disease (ischaemia, neuropathy and infection) will be examined in detail and the current evidence relating to management discussed.

Diagnostic Challenges in Diabetic Foot Disease

Year: 1

This module is optional

In order to provide optimal care to the patient with diabetes and concomitant lower limb disease it is essential that professionals working in the field are proficient in a wide range of assessment and monitoring skills. This module will provide participants with the advanced theoretical knowledge necessary to assess on-going pathophysiological disease processes (radiological, neurological, vascular, microbiological and haematological) in the person with diabetes admitted to hospital with concomitant lower limb pathology.

Diabetic Foot Infection

Year: 1

This module is optional

A working knowledge of infection is essential in management of diabetic foot disease. This module will provide clinicians with the information required to make an informed timely diagnosis of diabetic foot infections and the principals involved in managing them as part of a multidisciplinary team.

Global Healthcare Perspectives

Year: 1

This module is optional

This online module explores the diversity of healthcare systems worldwide and the need for capacity building in many countries worldwide. Issues such as the clinical/practice role of occupational therapy and physiotherapy in disasters and catastrophic emergencies, professional body and international standards and quality assurance are explored.

Professional licensure requirements and professional body accreditation are discussed from a global perspective.

Long Term Conditions

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module will enable the student to increase their knowledge and understanding of the pathophysiology process of various long term conditions. Strategies to motivate and empower patients to manage their condition will be explored alongside the role of family and carers. Best practice will be discussed and justified by critical evaluation of literature.

Airway Clearance Techniques

Year: 1

This module is optional

The 30 credit point module is formed on advancing participants' knowledge of physiology relating to airway clearance techniques, proficiency in using these techniques and knowledge of the scientific evidence supporting the use of these airway clearance techniques.

Advancing Rehabilitation for Respiratory Conditions

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module aims to advance participants' knowledge of key issues relating to pulmonary rehabilitation, physical activity and disease management in patients with respiratory conditions. It is designed for those involved in the management of people with respiratory conditions. It is designed for those involved in the management of people with respiratory conditions.

Exercise & Lifestyle Rehabilitation: Long Term Condition Management

Year: 1

This module is optional

Exercise and lifestyle prescription and evaluation in rehabilitation is an essential skill for the health care professional. This module will introduce the student to different approaches and enable them to integrate these approaches through development of clinical reasoning and clinical skills integrating evidence based practice.

Management of the Critically Ill Patient

Year: 1

This module is optional

The aim of this module is to enable practitioners working in teh critical care field to develop an in depth understanding of clinical practice, underpinned by knowledge of the appropriate theory and research, and to promote evidence based practice within the multidisciplinary team thereby optimising patient outcomes.

Neuromusculoskeletal Assessment and Management 1: Lumbar Spine and Pelvis

Year: 1

This module is optional

Management of vertebral dysfunction in an essential skill for the physiotherapist. Many different approaches to assessing and managing LBP and pelvic dysfunction presently exist. This module will introduce the student to different approaches and enable them to integrate these approaches through development of clinical reasoning and clinical skills integrating evidence based practice

Neuromusculoskeletal Assessment and Management 2: Cervical and Thoracic Spine

Year: 1

This module is optional

The aim of this module is to enable the student to develop clinical reasoning skills to enhance their ability to integrate different neuromusculoskeletal approaches in the management of cervical and thoracic spine dysfunction

Non-Invasive Ventilation

Year: 1

This module is optional

Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) is recognised as an important management strategy in acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. Appropriately trained members of the multidisciplinary team, could set up and implement an NIV service in primary and secondary care. This module will equip the post graduate student with diagnostic, clinical and critical thinking skills in order to facilitate the NIV care pathway.

Neuromusculoskeletal Assessment and Management of Upper Limb Dysfunction

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module will develop and enhance students' ability to manage neuromusculoskeletal conditions of the lower limb. Joint assessment, diagnosis and the development of clinical reasoning skills will be emphasised throughout the module.

Neuromusculoskeletal assessment and management of lower limb dysfunction

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module will develop and enhance students' ability to manage neuromusculoskeletal conditions of the lower limb. Joint assessment, diagnosis and the development of clinical reasoning skills will be emphasised throughout the module.

Computed Tomography 2: Staging, Screening, Angio and Interventional applications

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module enhances the knowledge of the Radiographers into more advanced CT investigations. The skills and knowledge gained will facilitate proficiency in CT imaging of the head, neck, chest, abdomen and pelvis when investigating for malignancy, chronic disease or surgical planning and also when CT imaging of the head, neck, chest, abdomen, pelvis and limbs when angiography or interventional techniques are required, as well as being able to critically evaluate CT images for technical suitability. The record of clinical training and cases will effectively demonstrate application of learning in CT imaging

Gynaecology in Medical Ultrasound

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module will enable the student to develop the knowledge, understanding and skills to undertake ultrasound imaging of the female genito-urinary system. It will provide the knowledge and understanding to enable the student to differentiate between normal and abnormal ultrasound appearances and to utilise problem solving skills to provide a differential diagnosis.

Fundamentals of Ultrasound in Medical Imaging

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module will enable the student to gain knowledge and understanding of the scientific and technological principles underpinning the safe and effective use of medical ultrasound in the clinical setting. It enables appraisal of a range of ultrasound technologies to optimise the production and recording of high quality diagnostic ultrasound images. The module enables the student to refine professional skills in order to meet the needs of the ultrasound service user in line with governance principles.

Clinical Abdominal Medical Ultrasound

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module will enable the student to develop the knowledge, understanding and skills to undertake ultrasound imaging of abdomen and pelvis independently and safely. It will provide the knowledge and understanding to enable the student to differentiate between normal and abnormal ultrasound appearances and to utilise problem solving skills to provide a differential diagnosis.

Clinical Obstetrics in Medical Ultrasound

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module will enable the student to evaluate the need to develop good scanning technique and follow protocols to produce technically accurate obstetric ultrasound examinations independently and safely. It will provide the knowledge and understanding to enable the student to differentiate between normal and abnormal ultrasound appearances and to utilise problem solving skills to provide a differential diagnosis necessary to inform the care pathway of the antenatal patient.

The Service User's Voice in Transforming my Service

Year: 1

This module is optional

Advancing Practice graduates should have a focus on how to understand the perspectives of the people who use the health, social, educational, and third sector services. This module provides a context and methodology to ensure that students are truly service user-centric. The output is a service improvement plan of action with rationale and implementation steps.

Computed Tomography (CT) Essentials: Promoting Advancing Practice

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module introduces the student to the essentials of CT. The skills and knowledge gained will facilitate proficiency in CT imaging of the head, cervical spine, chest, abdomen and pelvis, as well as being able to critically evaluate CT images for technical suitability. The record of clinical training and cases willv effectively demonstrate application of learning in CT imaging.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging 1

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module is designed to develop knowledge and understanding of the core principles of MR physics, technology and safety. The module also develops the skills of the MR Practitioner for standard imaging of the nervous system with an introduction to image critique and service delivery evaluation.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging 2

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module aims to build on the knowledge of the previous, with a recognition of the MR radiographer role and influence in the clinical department. Within the topic of the musculoskeletal and abdominopelvic systems students are encouraged to further develop their technical and pathological understanding of MRI. Students will also be given the opportunity to make a service delivery improvement and share this with other departments in order to positively impact the service-user experience.

Clinical Case Studies in Healthcare

Year: 1

This module is optional

This module enables the student to develop further knowledge and understanding of the role of their specialism in the management of patients. The encouragement to undertake effective literature searching and review will facilitate the development of an evidence based practice approach to develop and inform practitioner knowledge.

Radiotherapy and Oncology

Year: 1

This module is optional

The module is designed to evaluate new innovations and advances in radiotherapy and oncology practice. It will facilitate practising Therapeutic Radiographers to identifying and undertake areas of professional role development whilst encouraging critical reflection and evaluation of current radiotherapy practice. It will aid individuals in their continuing professional development and maintenance of professional registration.

Transforming My Service

Year: 1

This module is optional

Health Professionals need to actively engage and lead on transforming one's own service in light of service user feedback, technology-driven opportunities, economic constraints, professional and service standards, policy-driven directives, system-based analysis, and evidence-led findings. This module provides a creative and energising reflective space where the tools of service re-design can be fully explored and the process and outcome of service change disseminated.

Entry conditions

We recognise a range of qualifications for admission to our courses. In addition to the specific entry conditions for this course you must also meet the University’s General Entrance Requirements.

Entry Requirements

Applicants must:

(a)(i) Have a second class Honours degree or better in an Allied Health Profession subject from a university of the United Kingdom or the Republic of Ireland, from the Council for National Academic Awards, the National Council for Educational Awards, the Higher Education and Training Awards Council, or from an institution of another country which has been recognised as being of an equivalent standard; or

(ii) Have an equivalent standard in a Postgraduate Certificate, Graduate Diploma, Graduate Certificate or an approved alternative qualification; and

(iii) Where applicable be eligible for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council.

(iv) Where applicable have continued employment in an area relevant to the chosen modules.

(v) Have a minimum of one year's post-qualification experience (excluding course attendance).

(b) Provide evidence of competence in written and spoken English (GCSE grade C or equivalent) and for non-native English speakers, IELTS 7.0 (with no contributing band at less than 6.5) or, as an alternative to (a) (i) or (a) (ii) and/or (b):

(c) In exceptional circumstances, where an individual has substantial and significant experiential learning, a portfolio of written evidence demonstrating the meeting of graduate qualities (including subject-specific outcomes, as determined by the Course Committee) may be considered as an alternative entrance route. Evidence used to demonstrate graduate qualities may not be used for exemption against modules within the programme.

English Language Requirements

English language requirements for international applicants
The minimum requirement for this course is Academic IELTS 7.0 with no band score less than 6.5.

Ulster recognises a number of other English language tests and comparable IELTS equivalent scores.

Exemptions and transferability

Previous experiential learning or certificated learning may be eligible for exemption of modules/credit points within the Postgraduate Certificate, Diploma and Master's. Advice should be sought from the course director.

United States of America flagAdditional information for students from United States of America

Postgraduate

Typically we require applicant for taught programmes to hold the equivalent of a UK first degree (usually in a relevant subject area). Please refer to the specific entry requirements for your chosen course of study as outlined in the online prospectus. We consider students who have good grades in the following:

Qualification
Bachelor degree

English Language


Financial Information

In addition to the scholarships and bursaries open to all international students, US students may apply for Federal and Private US loans

Qualification
Level 12 English Lang in HSD

View more information for students from United States of America  

Careers & opportunities

Career options

Participation in the postgraduate framework may enhance the opportunities for AHPs within the health service and beyond. The development of the programme was as a direct consequence of the need for profession-specific and interdisciplinary modules to facilitate AHPs in their career progression.

Participation in the postgraduate activity will provide the development opportunity for AHPs to progress to doctoral level activity.

Work placement / study abroad

You must be practicing in your Professional area at the time of study.

Apply

Start dates

  • September 2020
  • January 2021

Fees and funding

Scholarships, awards and prizes

There is a prize for the Diagnostic Radiography student exiting at Diploma level in Ultrasound.

Additional mandatory costs

Tuition fees and costs associated with accommodation, travel (including car parking charges), and normal living are a part of university life.

Where a course has additional mandatory expenses we make every effort to highlight them. These may include residential visits, field trips, materials (e.g. art, design, engineering) inoculations, security checks, computer equipment, uniforms, professional memberships etc.

We aim to provide students with the learning materials needed to support their studies. Our libraries are a valuable resource with an extensive collection of books and journals as well as first-class facilities and IT equipment. Computer suites and free wifi is also available on each of the campuses.

There will be some additional costs to being a student which cannot be itemised and these will be different for each student. You may choose to purchase your own textbooks and course materials or prefer your own computer and software. Printing and binding may also be required. There are additional fees for graduation ceremonies, examination resits and library fines. Additional costs vary from course to course.

Students choosing a period of paid work placement or study abroad as part of their course should be aware that there may be additional travel and living costs as well as tuition fees.

Please contact the course team for more information.

Contact

Course Director:​ Dr John Cathcart

T: +44 (0)28 9036 8192

E: j.cathcart@ulster.ac.uk

Admissions contact regarding application process:

June Johnston

T: +44 (0)28 9036 6041

E: j.johnston@ulster.ac.uk

Attendance only:

Ms Emma McFall

T: +44 (0)28 9036 8167

E: e.mcfall@ulster.ac.uk

For more information visit

Faculty of Life and Health Sciences

School of Health Sciences

Disclaimer

  1. The University endeavours to deliver courses and programmes of study in accordance with the description set out in this prospectus. The University’s prospectus is produced at the earliest possible date in order to provide maximum assistance to individuals considering applying for a course of study offered by the University. The University makes every effort to ensure that the information contained in the prospectus is accurate but it is possible that some changes will occur between the date of printing and the start of the academic year to which it relates. Please note that the University’s website is the most up-to-date source of information regarding courses and facilities and we strongly recommend that you always visit the website before making any commitments.
  2. Although reasonable steps are taken to provide the programmes and services described, the University cannot guarantee the provision of any course or facility and the University may make variations to the contents or methods of delivery of courses, discontinue, merge or combine courses and introduce new courses if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Such circumstances include (but are not limited to) industrial action, lack of demand, departure of key staff, changes in legislation or government policy including changes, if any, resulting from the UK departing the European Union, withdrawal or reduction of funding or other circumstances beyond the University’s reasonable control.
  3. If the University discontinues any courses, it will use its best endeavours to provide a suitable alternative course. In addition, courses may change during the course of study and in such circumstances the University will normally undertake a consultation process prior to any such changes being introduced and seek to ensure that no student is unreasonably prejudiced as a consequence of any such change.
  4. The University does not accept responsibility (other than through the negligence of the University, its staff or agents), for the consequences of any modification or cancellation of any course, or part of a course, offered by the University but will take into consideration the effects on individual students and seek to minimise the impact of such effects where reasonably practicable.
  5. The University cannot accept any liability for disruption to its provision of educational or other services caused by circumstances beyond its control, but the University will take all reasonable steps to minimise the resultant disruption to such services.