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* This course is undergoing academic validation. Please note that the information displayed here is subject to change as part of this process.

Focusing on the design and development of games utilising the latest tools and technologies.

Summary

The MA Games Design is the perfect programme if you are passionate about the design and development of games. This creative course focuses on areas such as gameplay scripting, narrative techniques, level design and emerging technologies. Students will develop their skills by creating highly polished games that are underpinned by core game design principles and industry practises. Students will have the opportunity to create games for traditional and emerging platforms including contemporary technologies such as Virtual, augmented, and mixed reality devices allowing them to explore new possibilities in games.

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Belfast campus

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About this course

In this section

About

The UK has a long history of making world class video games and Northern Ireland is now host to many successful independent studios making it an ideal destination to study game design. The MA Games Design programme aims to further establish Ulster University’s Belfast School of Art as the regional, national and international centre of excellence for creative industries in education and research.

The programme is designed to develop a range of professional skills, problem solving and experiences, leading to advanced games design practice. Supporting the research and development of individual practice, the course also provides an environment to fully explore opportunities for collaboration, allowing students to realise theoretically and critically informed game designs, locating their work in contemporary commercial and cultural contexts. The course also offers new skills and opportunities for experienced professionals wishing to return to further study and develop their professional practice. The programme addresses the gap between Academia and Industry, providing access to new opportunities and expertise within the creative industries. This strategic and intellectual linking of ideas, processes and outcomes in the programme will enable participants to present projects in the real world to a national or international standard.

The MA Games Design course seeks to create graduates with the skills and production experiences necessary for them to succeed as Games Designers. Students develop a number of proficiencies that are both vocational and academic.

The aims of the course are to:

  • Manage, design and present prototypes to professional standards utilising specialist game design and development tools and skills.
  • Develop advanced proficiencies in a range of practical and technical skills (new technologies, contemporary design software, communications), that will enable direct entry into the games industry, specifically in the areas of design.
  • Conduct substantial and significant research in areas specific to game design and development.
  • Utilise new and emerging technologies such as Virtual, Augmented and Mixed Reality in the development of original and creative game design concepts.
  • Develop advanced critical and analytical skills relating to the design of historical and contemporary games.

Develop a comprehensive set of transferable skills, such as effective communication, organisation, group work and project management skills, pertinent to other sectors of the creative industries.

Attendance

Attendance is available in part-time and full-time modes. Please contact us for more information.

Start dates

  • September 2019
How to apply

Teaching, Learning and Assessment

An appropriate blend of established and effective reaching delivery methods will be employed to enhance your learning experience and to achieve the learning outcomes of the course. Typically large group teaching will include lectures, studio practice, demonstrations and small group teaching will include seminars, teamwork /projects, critiques (feedback).

The Aims and Learning Outcomes of the MA Games Design course will be achieved through a variety of teaching and learning methods, including:

Tutorials – 1-1 and team will help to develop communication skills and verbally process problems and tasks in hand. These are essential to support student learning and pastoral care.

Lectures – will impart essential information in traditional format. Case studies and the introduction of learning exercises within the lecture format will consolidate learning and introduce an opportunity for discussion and engagement. Guest lecturers from industry and academia will be invited throughout the programme to develop student engagement and understanding of the subject area.

Workshop and Studio Practice – will encourage the importance of problem solving, testing and refining, whilst also have the opportunity to learn new skills, ideas and approaches from experts in order to become experts within games design.

Practicals and Demonstrations – will introduce a process, technique or technologies to students by either a member of academic staff or a technician. They are a method employed to make you aware of the characteristics of transferable skills and technologies.

Critiques – will encourage effective communication, reflection, sharing of opinions, evaluation of information, skills and ideas and provide opportunities for peer learning.

Seminars – will encourage debate, reflexive thinking and good communication skills. They can facilitate deep learning: analysis, synthesis, evaluation of complex issues and construction of argument.

Teamwork projects – Collaborative learning provides the platform on which independent learning is nurtured. Giving you the opportunity to gain confidence, become aware of your strengths, and develop your own ideas. Tutorials, workshops and seminars will provide academic staff and students opportunities to discuss team progress, dynamics and evaluate member activity.

Blended learning – will offer the opportunity to consolidate and support face-to-face learning, communicate and share information with the wider cohort and develop essential digital skills. The course team will supplement and enhance module content including providing additional delivery of practical workshops, creating links to sources of further information, encourage online discussion groups the development of web based portfolios.

Diagnostic, formative and summative feedback – Diagnostic feedback is valuable in the very early stages of learning; it allows you to reflect throughout your learning rather than viewing it retrospectively. Ongoing formative feedback is given in tutorials, critiques and studio seminars in verbal form on a regular basis and is crucial to student progress. Formative feedback is also offered when part of the coursework is submitted for assessment during the semester. Summative feedback is presented after assessment in written and verbal forms and offers a chance for you to reflect on progress and achievement and to receive suggestions for future direction. The course team consider feedback crucial to both student and staff progress in that it:

  • Identifies and clarifies good performance
  • Encourages positive motivational beliefs and self-esteem
  • Give assessment choice (where appropriate)
  • Encourages 'time and effort' on task
  • Encourages interaction and dialogue (peer and teacher-learner)
  • Provide opportunities to act on feedback
  • Develop self-assessment and reflection
  • Informs and shapes teaching

The course ethos is based on the University, Faculty and School’s Teaching and Learning strategy. The course team aim to enhance the quality of the student learning experience by:

  • Providing a student-centred approach to teaching, learning and assessment
  • Providing increased opportunities for small group teaching
  • Providing a safe, yet challenging learning environment, that supports students to engage and learn with fellow students from diverse backgrounds and identities
  • Providing courses and programmes which are scholarship-informed, and where appropriate, research-informed, and taught and supervised by those engaged in research and/or scholarship
  • Focussing on assessment as a means of promoting student learning as well as providing evidence of that learning
  • Developing personal tutoring/studies advice/peer mentoring systems which meet the needs of students
  • Ensuring that learning resources in support of teaching and research degrees are accessible to all students

The University’s first year undergraduate teaching policy puts in place best practice for teachers and learners. The course team understand the importance of a fully integrated first year experience, which is evidenced by:

  • Induction (throughout the 1st Year)
  • Attendance Monitoring
  • Progressive study skills development
  • Small group teaching
  • Self & peer assessment
  • Early & regular timely feedback.

Academic profile

The academic staff have a wealth of experience working within the games industry and teaching creative subjects. Staff have worked on multiple titles that have been released for modern platforms such as PC, Xbox and Playstation. Staff are actively engaged with research and enterprise projects utilising the latest technologies such as augmented and virtual reality. This is providing a research environment that will give you opportunities to collaborate and engage with external industry, cultural and government bodies. In 2018 alone, students have won regional and national competitions by Royal Television Society NI, Flickerpix, Sixteen South and the BFX Awards

Modules

Here is a guide to the subjects studied on this course.

Courses are continually reviewed to take advantage of new teaching approaches and developments in research, industry and the professions. Please be aware that modules may change for your year of entry. The exact modules available and their order may vary depending on course updates, staff availability, timetabling and student demand. Please contact the course team for the most up to date module list.

In this section

Year one

Level and Narrative Development

Year: 1

Level Design is a fundamental component to any game's success. This module aims to provide students with advanced critical and implementation skills underpinned by level design theory for a variety of game genres. Students will first analyse current contemporary games to gain an understanding of their level structures and flow whilst designing an original level for that genre or game, based on their own analysis and planning.

Game Design and Rapid Prototyping

Year: 1

This module will provide initial framework from which an understanding of Game Design will be developed. Previous knowledge and experience will be revised, built upon and developed. The content is in part designed to contain some introduction to the essential elements of games design and rapid prototyping, which can also be attempted either at a basic, intermediate or advanced level. Assessment is based on two assessed outcomes, a pre-production document, and a prototype to be deployed on a windows-based platform.

Year two

Design Thinking

Year: 2

This module investigates and critically evaluates knowledge and understanding of the wider theoretical development of design as a discipline. The module provides students with a forum for the critical evaluation of the nature of contemporary design thinking and its manifestation in diverse practices. Students are expected to challenge their personal and collective assumptions about the nature of design thinking, to develop knowledge and understanding of current developments in design research and to formulate new alternative paradigms of design practice in the context of a multidisciplinary environment.

Game Systems and Economy Design

Year: 2

A critical aspect that all games in development share is the iterative design process facilitated through rigorous testing and game analysis. This module aims to build skills in game testing methodology and techniques, providing knowledge on how to collect and analyse feedback data from multiple playtesting sources. This analysis will then drive changes to core game systems and gameplay parameters, ultimately leading to balanced gameplay.

Contemporary Game Technologies

Year: 2

This module gives students opportunities to explore and dissect the complexities surrounding the development of games on platforms such as Virtual and Augmented reality. This module will look at considerations a designer should have in terms of controls, user interface and user experience whilst exploring the unique gameplay experiences that each platform can provide along with their limitations with key technical aspects will be explored for each platform.

Major Project

Year: 2

This module provides students with the opportunity to undertake a major, in-depth, individual study in an aspect of game design. The project will involve research and investigation in relevant aspects of a very specific area of study followed by the production of a major deliverable portfolio of relevant practice-based materials from the area of games design. The research, project process and evaluation will be reported via an accompanying written report which contextualises and evaluates the creative output.

Entry conditions

We recognise a range of qualifications for admission to our courses. In addition to the specific entry conditions for this course you must also meet the University’s General Entrance Requirements.

In this section

Entry Requirements

Applicants must hold a degree (with at least 2:2 Honours standard) or equivalent or demonstrate their ability to undertake the course through the accreditation of prior learning.

The specific requirements for admission are detailed below:

i) Applicants should normally hold a good honours degree in any Game Design, Game Development, Animation, Computer Science, Engineering, Design practice, Visual Arts or cognate subject from a University of the United Kingdom or the Republic of Ireland, from the Council of National Academic Awards, the Higher Education and Training Awards Council or from an institution of another country which is recognised as being of an equivalent standard.

ii) Applicants may be interviewed along with the presentation of a body of work that can take the form of, but is not limited to, a portfolio and/or showreel and proposal. Applicants must be able to satisfy the panel at interview that their work is of a standard that will allow them to deal with the intellectual and practical rigours of the programme.

iii) Applications are welcomed from diverse backgrounds however where there is a discipline shift the applicant must represent a coherent rationale for this shift and evidence prerequisite knowledge, skills and experience.

The programme is devised specifically to support continuing lifelong learning for professions in a rapidly changing field. Therefore APL (Accreditation for Prior Learning) will be considered as evidence of exceptional ability appropriate to recruitment to the programme. Applications from professionals with extensive professional, industrial and/or commercial experience but lacking recent or higher level academic qualifications will be encouraged. APL (Advanced Prior Learning) will be considered as evidence of exceptional ability appropriate to the course.

English Language Requirements

English language requirements for international applicants
The minimum requirement for this course is Academic IELTS 6.0 with no band score less than 5.5. Trinity ISE: Pass at level III also meets this requirement for Tier 4 visa purposes.

Ulster recognises a number of other English language tests and comparable IELTS equivalent scores.

Careers & opportunities

In this section

Career options

This programme is designed to prepare students for a career in a range of game development related fields such as game design, level design, app development and game testing.

Apply

How to apply Request a prospectus

Start dates

  • September 2019

Contact

Course Director: Brian Coyle

b.coyle@ulster.ac.uk

For more information visit

Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

Belfast School of Art

Disclaimer

  1. The University endeavours to deliver courses and programmes of study in accordance with the description set out in this prospectus. The University’s prospectus is produced at the earliest possible date in order to provide maximum assistance to individuals considering applying for a course of study offered by the University. The University makes every effort to ensure that the information contained in the prospectus is accurate but it is possible that some changes will occur between the date of printing and the start of the academic year to which it relates. Please note that the University’s website is the most up-to-date source of information regarding courses and facilities and we strongly recommend that you always visit the website before making any commitments.
  2. Although reasonable steps are taken to provide the programmes and services described, the University cannot guarantee the provision of any course or facility and the University may make variations to the contents or methods of delivery of courses, discontinue, merge or combine courses and introduce new courses if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Such circumstances include (but are not limited to) industrial action, lack of demand, departure of key staff, changes in legislation or government policy including changes, if any, resulting from the UK departing the European Union, withdrawal or reduction of funding or other circumstances beyond the University’s reasonable control.
  3. If the University discontinues any courses, it will use its best endeavours to provide a suitable alternative course. In addition, courses may change during the course of study and in such circumstances the University will normally undertake a consultation process prior to any such changes being introduced and seek to ensure that no student is unreasonably prejudiced as a consequence of any such change.
  4. The University does not accept responsibility (other than through the negligence of the University, its staff or agents), for the consequences of any modification or cancellation of any course, or part of a course, offered by the University but will take into consideration the effects on individual students and seek to minimise the impact of such effects where reasonably practicable.
  5. The University cannot accept any liability for disruption to its provision of educational or other services caused by circumstances beyond its control, but the University will take all reasonable steps to minimise the resultant disruption to such services.