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Energy Storage - MSc

MSc Energy Storage provides the expertise to fulfil the expectations of an energy storage market that is predicted to grow to $250 billion by 2040.

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Overview

MSc Energy Storage provides the expertise to fulfil the expectations of an energy storage market that is predicted to grow to $250 billion by 2040.

Summary

Energy Storage is a rapidly developing field of study within both academia and industry, in response to the need to decarbonise our energy systems through renewable energy. Bloomberg New Energy Finance predicts explosive growth over the next 12 years.

Our MSc Energy Storage programme will enable graduates to embark on a professional career in energy storage with the high-level skills needed to meet the emerging challenges. Large scale renewable energy from non-dispatchable wind and solar energy, for example, has begun to threaten the operation of existing electricity networks in several countries.

You will be introduced to the essential areas of renewable energy, energy management, distributed energy resource management and energy storage technologies.

A key feature of the course is our staff; you will be taught by published academics who will enhance your learning experience with research-led teaching.

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About this course

In this section

About

Our MSc in Energy Storage is a three-year part-time Master’s degree designed for those who are keen to address the challenges to move towards a low carbon society.

The progamme provides a thorough grounding in the core disciplines of energy storage and is embedded in global best practice, technology and economics of its deployment. The course combines technology understanding with critical assessment of performance characteristics within energy market structures, giving graduates an expertise in sizing and selecting the optimum energy storage technology.

The course is delivered by the Centre of Sustainable Technologies (CST), whose knowledge, facilities, industrial links and data sets are drawn from more than £10M of externally funded past and current projects in energy storage. As a primary example, SPIRE 2 – Storage Platform for the Integration of Renewable Energy - is a University of Ulster led EU funded Euro 6.7M cross border project exploring how energy storage resources owned by business and domestic consumers can resolve the problem of the variability of output from renewable energy.

Students will have the opportunity to engage with industry during their research dissertation project and through the participation in workshops/seminars organised by the Centre for Sustainable Technologies linked to national and international projects in the field of energy storage and energy.

Attendance

All modules will be delivered through blended learning (i.e. via virtual learning environment, VLE, as well as traditional face-to-face teaching in Jordanstown campus). Blended learning will provide students with the opportunity to have direct contact with the team, access seminars to engage with industry and generate experience in the laboratories of the Centre for Sustainable Technologies at Jordanstown campus. A blended learning approach will ensure that the learner is engaged and in control of his/her individual learning experience. We also believe that this approach helps to better meet individual needs of the learner.

Start dates

  • September 2019
How to apply

Teaching, Learning and Assessment

Teaching methods are diverse and planned for an advanced education in energy storage. Lectures are considered an effective way of engaging students and communicating knowledge coherently. There are both face to face and on-line teaching through our University’s VLE, Blackboard Learn (BBL). Practical, laboratory-based work is a central activity, and the Centre for Sustainable Technologies has a number of state-of-the-art laboratories in which renewable and energy storage systems can be both demonstrated and assessed.

The modules are all 15 credit point modules, except for the dissertation module that is 60 credit points, for a total of 180 credits. Modules are all 100% coursework. There are a maximum of two items of assessment in a module. An item may include more than one component, but the overall item will have a single mark.

Academic profile

The University employs over 1,000 suitably qualified and experienced academic staff - 59% have PhDs in their subject field and many have professional body recognition.

Courses are taught by staff who are Professors (25%), Readers, Senior Lecturers (18%) or Lecturers (57%).

We require most academic staff to be qualified to teach in higher education: 82% hold either Postgraduate Certificates in Higher Education Practice or higher. Most academic staff (81%) are accredited fellows of the Higher Education Academy (HEA) - the university sector professional body for teaching and learning. Many academic and technical staff hold other professional body designations related to their subject or scholarly practice.

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The profiles of many academic staff can be found on the University’s departmental websites and give a detailed insight into the range of staffing and expertise. The precise staffing for a course will depend on the department(s) involved and the availability and management of staff. This is subject to change annually and is confirmed in the timetable issued at the start of the course.

Occasionally, teaching may be supplemented by suitably qualified part-time staff (usually qualified researchers) and specialist guest lecturers. In these cases, all staff are inducted, mostly through our staff development programme ‘First Steps to Teaching’. In some cases, usually for provision in one of our out-centres, Recognised University Teachers are involved, supported by the University in suitable professional development for teaching.

Figures correct for academic year 2019-2020.

Modules

Here is a guide to the subjects studied on this course.

Courses are continually reviewed to take advantage of new teaching approaches and developments in research, industry and the professions. Please be aware that modules may change for your year of entry. The exact modules available and their order may vary depending on course updates, staff availability, timetabling and student demand. Please contact the course team for the most up to date module list.

In this section

Year one

Electricity Storage and Electricity Networks

Year: 1

The aims of the module are to understand through a series of lectures and seminars, the technologies that enable direct or indirect electricity storage. Such systems in a global context are at a range of scales and are dependent on local geographical, environmental, infrastructural and economic factors. The understanding of the role of electrical storage technologies in storing and managing both electricity supplies and demands

Energy Policy, Markets and Economics

Year: 1

This module examines current and future energy markets, market participation, the development of the smart grid and how building-integrated storage and generation can be used to optimise profit and energy efficiency.

Current Status of Energy Systems

Year: 1

Energy resources, energy production, energy economics and the environment are all inextricably linked. These ties need to be enforced if the concept of sustainability is to be realised.

Wind Energy Conversion Technologies

Year: 1

This module will introduce students to wind energy theory and technology, resource assessment and wind farm site development. It will also discuss the implications of both very large scale development and large numbers of individual turbines on existing electricity distribution networks.

Year two

International Best Practice in Energy Storage Integration

Year: 2

This module will provide the participant with a global overview of best practice that demonstrates the successful integration of Renewable Energy in both the electricity Transmission System and the electricity Distribution System. Furthermore, it will address in detail heating, cooling and alternative distributed energy resource applications in a global context.

Thermal Storage and Heat Networks

Year: 2

This module will provide the participant with a global overview of best practice that demonstrates the successful integration of Renewable Energy in both the electricity Transmission System to the electricity Distribution System. Furthermore, it will address in detail heating, cooling and alternative distributed energy resource applications in a global context.

Distributed Energy Resources

Year: 2

The aims of the module are to understand through a series of lectures and seminars, the array of techniques and technologies associated with demand side management and how its role in variable renewable energy management has evolved into consideration as distributed energy resources (DER). DER will be demonstrated in laboratories and assessment will be through a series of design problems to test your mastery of this specialist area.

Solar energy processes and technologies

Year: 2

This module will enable students to appreciate, analyse and evaluate current solar energy technologies and understand how these resources may be managed with a view to future sustainability and demonstrate how the management of energy can benefit industry financially in the short term and influence sustainability in the longer term.

Year three

Research Dissertation

Year: 3

This module will allow the student to undertake an independent, in-depth study of a particular aspect of renewable energy technology or energy mnagement strategy, policy or implementation whether covered in the course or not. It will provide an opportunity for students to integrate knowledge in the identification, description analysis and, where appropriate, solution of a problem within the area of Renewable Energy and Energy Management, and to place it within the context of existing knowledge and recent developments in this area.

Entry conditions

We recognise a range of qualifications for admission to our courses. In addition to the specific entry conditions for this course you must also meet the University’s General Entrance Requirements.

In this section

Entry Requirements

Applicants must:

(a) have gained:

(i) a second class honours degree or better, in the subject areas of science or engineering or related discipline, from a university of the United Kingdom or the Republic of Ireland, or from a recognised national awarding body, or from an institution of another country which has been recognised as being of an equivalent standard;

or

(ii) an equivalent standard (normally 50%) in a Graduate Diploma, Graduate Certificate, Postgraduate Certificate or Postgraduate Diploma or an approved alternative qualification; and the qualification must be in the subject areas of science, engineering or related discipline.

and

(b) provide evidence of competence in written and spoken English (GCSE grade C or equivalent).

In exceptional circumstances, as an alternative to (a) (i) or (a) (ii) and/or (b), where an individual has substantial and significant experiential learning, a portfolio of written evidence demonstrating the meeting of graduate qualities (including subject-specific outcomes, as determined by the Course Committee) may be considered as an alternative entrance route. Evidence used to demonstrate graduate qualities may not be used for exemption against modules within the programme.

English Language Requirements

English language requirements for international applicants
The minimum requirement for this course is Academic IELTS 6.0 with no band score less than 5.5. Trinity ISE: Pass at level III also meets this requirement for Tier 4 visa purposes.

Ulster recognises a number of other English language tests and comparable IELTS equivalent scores.

Exemptions and transferability

Students may be admitted to the programme in line with Accreditation of Prior Learning guidelines. Students from this course would be eligible to directly enter graduate employment or to proceed to further study at PhD level.

Careers & opportunities

In this section

Career options

The MSc Energy Storage programme aims to prepare students for a successful career in energy or energy storage. In the United States, it is predicted that there will be over 350,000 energy storage jobs by 2025. The EU will support a new battery cell manufacturing industry with a 200M Euro investment. The UK Clean Growth Strategy reports over 430,000 in the low carbon sector and 17,750 jobs linked with the growing energy storage and electric vehicle industry.

Students will have the opportunity to apply for a job or improving their position in energy transmission companies, energy distribution companies, energy supply companies, consultancies and at a regional or national government level.

Furthermore, employability is at the heart of Ulster University vision. The MSc Energy Storage programme will allow students to develop and enhance their employability skills. Employability is embedded within the modules rather than concentrating on specific modules.

Apply

How to apply Request a prospectus

Applications to our postgraduate courses are made through the University’s online application system.

Start dates

  • September 2019

Fees and funding

In this section

Fees (total cost)

Important notice - fees information Fees illustrated are based on 19/20 entry and are subject to an annual increase. Correct at the time of publishing. Terms and conditions apply. Additional mandatory costs are highlighted where they are known in advance. There are other costs associated with university study.
Visit our Fees pages for full details of fees

Northern Ireland & EU:
£5,900.00

International:
£14,060.00  Scholarships available

Additional mandatory costs

Tuition fees and costs associated with accommodation, travel (including car parking charges), and normal living are a part of university life.

Where a course has additional mandatory expenses we make every effort to highlight them. These may include residential visits, field trips, materials (e.g. art, design, engineering) inoculations, security checks, computer equipment, uniforms, professional memberships etc.

We aim to provide students with the learning materials needed to support their studies. Our libraries are a valuable resource with an extensive collection of books and journals as well as first-class facilities and IT equipment. Computer suites and free wifi is also available on each of the campuses.

There will be some additional costs to being a student which cannot be itemised and these will be different for each student. You may choose to purchase your own textbooks and course materials or prefer your own computer and software. Printing and binding may also be required. There are additional fees for graduation ceremonies, examination resits and library fines. Additional costs vary from course to course.

Students choosing a period of paid work placement or study abroad as part of their course should be aware that there may be additional travel and living costs as well as tuition fees.

Please contact the course team for more information.

Contact

Admissions contact for entry requirements:
Dorothy McCrory
T: +44 (028) 9036 6231
E: de.mccrory@ulster.ac.uk

Centralised Admissions staff:
T: +44 (0)28 9036 6309
E: admissionsjn@ulster.ac.uk

For course specific enquiries
Dr Nik Shah, Course Director
T: +44 (0)28 9036 6122
E: n.shah@ulster.ac.uk

For more information visit

Faculty of Computing, Engineering and the Built Environment

Belfast School of Architecture and the Built Environment

Disclaimer

  1. The University endeavours to deliver courses and programmes of study in accordance with the description set out in this prospectus. The University’s prospectus is produced at the earliest possible date in order to provide maximum assistance to individuals considering applying for a course of study offered by the University. The University makes every effort to ensure that the information contained in the prospectus is accurate but it is possible that some changes will occur between the date of printing and the start of the academic year to which it relates. Please note that the University’s website is the most up-to-date source of information regarding courses and facilities and we strongly recommend that you always visit the website before making any commitments.
  2. Although reasonable steps are taken to provide the programmes and services described, the University cannot guarantee the provision of any course or facility and the University may make variations to the contents or methods of delivery of courses, discontinue, merge or combine courses and introduce new courses if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Such circumstances include (but are not limited to) industrial action, lack of demand, departure of key staff, changes in legislation or government policy including changes, if any, resulting from the UK departing the European Union, withdrawal or reduction of funding or other circumstances beyond the University’s reasonable control.
  3. If the University discontinues any courses, it will use its best endeavours to provide a suitable alternative course. In addition, courses may change during the course of study and in such circumstances the University will normally undertake a consultation process prior to any such changes being introduced and seek to ensure that no student is unreasonably prejudiced as a consequence of any such change.
  4. The University does not accept responsibility (other than through the negligence of the University, its staff or agents), for the consequences of any modification or cancellation of any course, or part of a course, offered by the University but will take into consideration the effects on individual students and seek to minimise the impact of such effects where reasonably practicable.
  5. The University cannot accept any liability for disruption to its provision of educational or other services caused by circumstances beyond its control, but the University will take all reasonable steps to minimise the resultant disruption to such services.