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Overview

Would you like to hold a LLM in Employment Law and Practice?

Summary

The overall aim of this course is to promote, skill and research in the field of employment law.

On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

Develop an understanding of the core concepts of employment law and how they relate to practice

Learn the skills and processes required to qualify them to practice in the employment law field as HR professionals/lawyers

Develop the ability to reflect critically on and learn from their practice

Understand and apply context specific employment law research and theory to specific contexts and occupational sectors such as Human Resources and legal practice

Develop advanced employment law practice skills appropriate to specific contexts and occupational sectors Examine critically the legal and contextual basis of employment law and practice

Develop an understanding of regional, national and international models of practice in the employment law arena

Give employment lawyers and Human Resource professionals the opportunity to interact with each other to develop insights into practice beyond their own agencies.

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About this course

In this section

About

The Law School at Ulster University has joined forces with Legal Island, the Labour Relations Agency and Mediation NI to create what we think will be the best employment law course in the UK. This is the only employment law Masters in UK and Ireland and has the option of achieving a dual award with the OCN qualification in mediation with Mediation NI.

The course includes employment law and compliance lectures from the cream of Northern Ireland’s employment law expert practitioners including Mediation NI. There will be on-site visits and role play exercises with Labour Relations Agency staff and the President of Industrial Tribunals and the Fair Employment Tribunal.

Attendance

This programme can be taken full-time over one year, or part-time over two years.

The programme consists of 180 credits, comprising taught courses worth 120 credits (60credits per semester) and a dissertation worth 60 credits.

Start dates

  • September 2019
How to apply

Academic profile

The University employs over 1,000 suitably qualified and experienced academic staff - 59% have PhDs in their subject field and many have professional body recognition.

Courses are taught by staff who are Professors (25%), Readers, Senior Lecturers (18%) or Lecturers (57%).

We require most academic staff to be qualified to teach in higher education: 82% hold either Postgraduate Certificates in Higher Education Practice or higher. Most academic staff (81%) are accredited fellows of the Higher Education Academy (HEA) - the university sector professional body for teaching and learning. Many academic and technical staff hold other professional body designations related to their subject or scholarly practice.

The profiles of many academic staff can be found on the University’s departmental websites and give a detailed insight into the range of staffing and expertise. The precise staffing for a course will depend on the department(s) involved and the availability and management of staff. This is subject to change annually and is confirmed in the timetable issued at the start of the course.

Occasionally, teaching may be supplemented by suitably qualified part-time staff (usually qualified researchers) and specialist guest lecturers. In these cases, all staff are inducted, mostly through our staff development programme ‘First Steps to Teaching’. In some cases, usually for provision in one of our out-centres, Recognised University Teachers are involved, supported by the University in suitable professional development for teaching.

Figures correct for academic year 2019-2020.

Modules

Here is a guide to the subjects studied on this course.

Courses are continually reviewed to take advantage of new teaching approaches and developments in research, industry and the professions. Please be aware that modules may change for your year of entry. The exact modules available and their order may vary depending on course updates, staff availability, timetabling and student demand. Please contact the course team for the most up to date module list.

In this section

Year one

Employment Compliance and Development

Year: 1

Whether you are a lawyer, human resources professional, personnel or industrial relations officer, this module will develop a range of skills, which will enable all students to remain fully abreast of the latest legislative and case law developments in employment compliance. It will ensure that all students acquire in-depth knowledge and understanding of how employment compliance issues operates in practice. Students will be provided with assistance enabling them to respond to complex practical, legal and ethical problems. Students will be encouraged to critically analyse the law and important legal issues they face in practice.

Dissertation Part 1

Year: 1

The dissertation module is designed to enable students to develop and apply the demonstrable research skills in the form of independent research leading to 12,000 words dissertation on a topic of choice in commercial-law related fields. Students would be advised to choose their research topics in areas for which there are supervision expertise within the school of law.

Employment Law

Year: 1

The importance of the employment relationship between employers, employees, unions and
other statutory bodies and agencies is such that a thorough knowledge of both the context and
the substantive law is necessary for those involved in this area in any capacity. The module
attempts to provide the basis for this knowledge and to put students in the position where they
may not only have an understanding of the law both conceptually and substantively, but also be
in a position to use that knowledge in the solution of problems.

Alternative Dispute Resolution

Year: 1

Methods of ADR are increasingly being used within the legal system and advocated as a means of removing cases from overburdened courts. In appropriate cases they can provide an alternative to legal adjudication and can be used as a means of achieving satisfactory solutions to disputes. The purpose of this module is to introduce students to the processes of Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) and its relationship to law. The course will cover processes such as arbitration, mediation and conciliation and will provide students with a foundational knowledge of ADR which can then be developed in their professional practice. The module will comprise both theoretical and skills based elements. Students will consider the rationale and ethics of ADR before being introduced to some of the practical skills used in these processes. The study and practice of ADR will be undertaken in the context of a range of legal subject areas, including commercial law, family law and employment law.

Tribunal Representation

Year: 1

This module aims through a combination of lectures and practical exercises to enable trainees to further develop their own professional practice in relation to employment and social security matters. The module aims to develop a student's ability to apply and further develop the knowledge and practical skills gained in prior and concurrent modules. The module will encourage discussion of rationales and consequences of each available course of action in any given scenario, and students will be encouraged to critique solutions to any issues identified as arising from their choice(s). It is anticipated that students will examine the impact of the rules and procedures involved and their tactical application in practice with a view to developing their own individual work practice.

Year two

Dissertation Part 2

Year: 2

The dissertation module is designed to enable students to develop and apply the demonstrable research skills in the form of independent research leading to 12,000 words dissertation on a topic of choice in commercial-law related fields. Students would be advised to choose their research topics in areas for which there are supervision expertise within the school of law.

Equality Law

Year: 2

This module introduces the students to core principles of equality law, with a focus upon the law of Northern Ireland but in the context of British, European, comparative constitutional and international law. It examines a spectrum of non-discrimination and equality law concepts and their enforcement over the key grounds and considers the future development of equality law.

Commercial Alternative Dispute Resolution

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module introduces students to the nature of conflict and disputes; considers the various options for dispute resolution including, in particular, adjudication, arbitration and mediation; and will provide students with a foundational knowledge of ADR which can then be developed in their professional practice. Specifically, this module provides a foundation for the subsequent Mediation module.

International Commercial Law

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module will provide a solid basis for acquiring knowledge and understanding and developing analyses of the key concepts, problems and issues in the area of commercial law. The theories, principles and rules of commercial law will be examined with reference to European and international developments. It will examine and evaluate the key features of commercial law from both a theoretical and practical perspective.

Mediation

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module, offered in partnership between Ulster University and Mediation Northern Ireland will allow students to consider the nature of conflict, to explore the process of mediation and experience the role of mediator. As well as constituting a module of study assessed by the University this module, when fully completed, also covers the content of "Mediation Theory & Practice" - a Mediation Northern Ireland training course accredited by the Open College Network Northern Ireland as a Level 3 course earning 9 credit points. "Mediation Theory & Practice" equates to an NVQ Level 3 or an Advanced Diploma and is one of the recognized qualifications for mediators in the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland. Successful completion of this module will (subject to particular criteria specified by Mediation Northern Ireland and formally agreed between the student and Mediation Northern Ireland) entitle students to also apply, via submission of an additional learning portfolio, to Mediation Northern Ireland for this recognised professional qualification.

Derivatives and Financial Markets

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module, offered in association between Ulster University and Fieldfisher LLP's Belfast and London offices, guides students through the key areas of financial markets trading and regulation with a specific emphasis on derivatives and securities financing. Students will consider, in particular, master agreements used for a variety of transactions in cross border markets. This module not only equips students with underpinning knowledge of relevant aspects of the law but also provides key opportunities to directly engage in case studies based on the type of practical work undertaken by an experienced financial services practice.

Economic, Social and Cultural Rights

Year: 2

This module is optional

Day 1. ESCRs: Nature, Concepts and Measurement

Session one: On the Nature of ESCRs

Session two: Progressive Realization of ESCRs: Concept and Measurement

Day 2. Domestic and Regional Protection of ESCRs

Session one: ESCRs in Domestic Legal Systems

Session two: ESCRs in Regional Human Rights Systems

Day 3. Selected Substantive ESCRs

Session one: The Right to Health

Session two: The Right to Work and Education

Dissertation Research Methods

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module provides a full range of skills which students need to be able to produce rigorous pieces of research as part of their dissertation, and prepare for professional stages and a career in human rights law and/or transitional justice. It attempts to bridge the gap between academic and practical law. The understanding of sources of public international law and study techniques including transferable skills in areas such as performing UN- research and time-management is a fundamentally skill. This understanding can then be applied to help support a practical approach to learning.

Foundations of International Human Rights Law

Year: 2

This module is optional

The module will enable the student to master the complex and specialised area of international human rights law. Students will be encouraged to develop an in-depth critical understanding of both the content of international human rights standards and the various means by which they are enforced. It will act as a foundational basis which will enable learners to study issues in greater detail in subsequent modules. These have been developed in response to the growth of new areas of interest in international human rights law. The aim will be to provide students with a degree that reflects contemporary international human rights law and enables them to make good use of the expertise of staff.

Entry conditions

We recognise a range of qualifications for admission to our courses. In addition to the specific entry conditions for this course you must also meet the University’s General Entrance Requirements.

In this section

Entry Requirements

Applicants must hold a degree in law or human resource management, or a degree with
significant law content or a non law degree or non human resource degree but with
appropriate work experience or equivalent or demonstrate their ability to undertake the
course through the accreditation or prior experiential learning.

English Language Requirements

English language requirements for international applicants
The minimum requirement for this course is Academic IELTS 6.0 with no band score less than 5.5. Trinity ISE: Pass at level III also meets this requirement for Tier 4 visa purposes.

Ulster recognises a number of other English language tests and comparable IELTS equivalent scores.

Careers & opportunities

In this section

Career options

Those who undertake this course are likely to use this qualification for career development and progression purposes within their own organisations.

Apply

How to apply Request a prospectus

Start dates

  • September 2019

Fees and funding

In this section

Fees (total cost)

Important notice - fees information Fees illustrated are based on 19/20 entry and are subject to an annual increase. Correct at the time of publishing. Terms and conditions apply. Additional mandatory costs are highlighted where they are known in advance. There are other costs associated with university study.
Visit our Fees pages for full details of fees

Northern Ireland & EU:
£7,310.00

Additional mandatory costs

Tuition fees and costs associated with accommodation, travel (including car parking charges), and normal living are a part of university life.

Where a course has additional mandatory expenses we make every effort to highlight them. These may include residential visits, field trips, materials (e.g. art, design, engineering) inoculations, security checks, computer equipment, uniforms, professional memberships etc.

We aim to provide students with the learning materials needed to support their studies. Our libraries are a valuable resource with an extensive collection of books and journals as well as first-class facilities and IT equipment. Computer suites and free wifi is also available on each of the campuses.

There will be some additional costs to being a student which cannot be itemised and these will be different for each student. You may choose to purchase your own textbooks and course materials or prefer your own computer and software. Printing and binding may also be required. There are additional fees for graduation ceremonies, examination resits and library fines. Additional costs vary from course to course.

Students choosing a period of paid work placement or study abroad as part of their course should be aware that there may be additional travel and living costs as well as tuition fees.

Please contact the course team for more information.

Contact

Please contact Dr Esther McGuinness:

+442895367249

ep.mcguinness@ulster.ac.uk

For more information visit

Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

School of Law

Disclaimer

  1. The University endeavours to deliver courses and programmes of study in accordance with the description set out in this prospectus. The University’s prospectus is produced at the earliest possible date in order to provide maximum assistance to individuals considering applying for a course of study offered by the University. The University makes every effort to ensure that the information contained in the prospectus is accurate but it is possible that some changes will occur between the date of printing and the start of the academic year to which it relates. Please note that the University’s website is the most up-to-date source of information regarding courses and facilities and we strongly recommend that you always visit the website before making any commitments.
  2. Although reasonable steps are taken to provide the programmes and services described, the University cannot guarantee the provision of any course or facility and the University may make variations to the contents or methods of delivery of courses, discontinue, merge or combine courses and introduce new courses if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Such circumstances include (but are not limited to) industrial action, lack of demand, departure of key staff, changes in legislation or government policy including changes, if any, resulting from the UK departing the European Union, withdrawal or reduction of funding or other circumstances beyond the University’s reasonable control.
  3. If the University discontinues any courses, it will use its best endeavours to provide a suitable alternative course. In addition, courses may change during the course of study and in such circumstances the University will normally undertake a consultation process prior to any such changes being introduced and seek to ensure that no student is unreasonably prejudiced as a consequence of any such change.
  4. The University does not accept responsibility (other than through the negligence of the University, its staff or agents), for the consequences of any modification or cancellation of any course, or part of a course, offered by the University but will take into consideration the effects on individual students and seek to minimise the impact of such effects where reasonably practicable.
  5. The University cannot accept any liability for disruption to its provision of educational or other services caused by circumstances beyond its control, but the University will take all reasonable steps to minimise the resultant disruption to such services.