Linguistics and TESOL - MSc - Video

Developing linguistically trained language teachers.

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Overview

Developing linguistically trained language teachers.

Summary

The aim of this program is to bring together Linguistic theory and teaching practice, including a practical component. By the end of this program, students will have an underpinning in core aspects of Linguistic theory, such as syntax, morphology and discourse analysis. The course will also introduce students to broader areas of inquiry, including first and second language acquisition and multilingualism. This will be combined with English language teaching theory and practice, and students will also have the opportunity for hands-on teaching practice.

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About this course

In this section

About

This programme is a linked Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) and Master's (MSc). The PGDip comprises six modules. Students will take two 15 credit modules in linguistics and one 30credit module in TESOL per semester.

For an MSc award, you will also undertake an individual dissertation (12,000-15,000 words). Each student is allocated a supervisor who will support their individual research project.

Each module is weighted with credit points indicating the amount of student effort required. Full-time students are required to complete 60 credits per semester (1 credit point equates to approximately 10 student effort hours.

Attendance

Classes are held during the day. Exact times vary, but each module generally involves 2-3 hours per week of class time that may be divided between lectures and seminars/workshops/practicals. Outside of this, you will also be expected to spend considerable time in independent study and you may also be involved in meetings with staff or with your fellow students on group projects.

Start dates

  • October 2018
How to apply

Modules

Here is a guide to the subjects studied on this course.

Courses are continually reviewed to take advantage of new teaching approaches and developments in research, industry and the professions. Please be aware that modules may change for your year of entry. The exact modules available and their order may vary depending on course updates, staff availability, timetabling and student demand. Please contact the course team for the most up to date module list.

In this section

Year one

English & Comparative Syntax

Year: 1

Syntax is a rapidly developing discipline with many unsolved problems which are subject to hot debates in the literature. This module focuses on the current discussions in syntactic theorizing introducing students to work at the cutting edge of theoretical syntax with special reference to the syntax of English.

Language Acquisition

Year: 1

This module covers current theoretical and methodological issues in first and second language acquisition research.

Multilingualism

Year: 1

It is generally accepted that the majority of the world's population speaks more than one language and that the monolingual situation is now rather uncommon. This module focuses on recent advances on multilingualism and introduces post-graduate students to topical current theoretical debates. Apart froms its interest for theories of language acquisition, a more sophisticated understanding of the phenomenon of multilingualism can assist teachers, speech and language therapists and other language professionals when they have to deal with multilingual children and adults. This module focuses on recent advances on multilingualism and introduces post-graduate students to topical current theoretical debates. The module can also be delivered as a stand-alone CPPD module for language professionals that wish to advance their knowledge on aspects of multilingual development.

Spoken Discourse

Year: 1

This module aims to develop students' understanding of the dfferent theoretical approaches to the analysis of spoken discourse and also to facilitate students' engagement with current epistemological and methodological debates. The module will focus on Conversation Analysis as an analytical approach to understanding institutional talk in interaction.

Language Teaching Methodologies

Year: 1

This module focuses on the practical tools and strategies needed for creative language teaching. It features a series of lectures and practical exercises which support a programme of peer teaching sessions in which students design and deliver lessons in small groups. Challenges to effective language teaching are explored through critical reflective practice on peer teaching sessions. Additionally, the module prepares students for CMM761, the Language Teaching Practice module in semester two.

English Language Teaching Practice

Year: 1

This module gives an authentic opportunity to teach English to non-native speakers of English. They teach to speakers with a range of English language proficiency. The key objective of the module is that graduates will enter the employment market fit for purpose - as competitive and competent candidates for posts as English language teachers in high quality language teaching institutions.

Dissertation

Year: 1

The Communication dissertation aims to enable students to design and carry out an independent piece of research. It is intended that this will strengthen their ability to interpret and apply research data to a work environment. The research will focus in depth on one area of communication.

Required

Bryman, A. (2012). Social Research Methods 4th ed, China: Oxford University Press.

Henn, M., Weinstein, M., Foard, N. (2009). A Critical Introduction to Social Research, Wiltshire: Sage Publications Ltd.

McQueen, R., Knussen, C. (2002). Research Methods for Social Science: An Introduction, Harlow: Pearson Education.

Recommended

Creswell, J.W. (2009). Research Design: Qualitative, Quantitative & Mixed Methods Approach. (3 ed) (2009). USA: Sage.

Davies, M.B. (2007). Doing a Successful Research Project using Quantitative or Quantitative Methods. China: Palgrave Macmillan.

Dawson, C. (2009). Introduction to Research Methods: A Practical Guide to Anyone Undertaking a Research Project (4th ed). Trowbridge, Wiltshire: How to Books Ltd.

Foster, J.J. (2001). Data Analysis for Windows - Using SPSS, London: Sage. Greenhalgh, T. How to Read a Paper: The Basics of Evidence-based Medicine (3rd), UK: Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Hart, C. (2002). Doing a Literature Review, London: Sage.

Matthew, B., Ross L. (2010). Research Methods: A Practical Guide for the Social Sciences. Italy: Pearson Education Ltd.

Silverman, D. (2010). Doing Qualitative Research, London: Sage.

Wray, A., Trott, K., Bloomer, A. (2003). Projects in Linguistics: A Practical Guide to Researching Language, London: Arnold.

Wrench, J.S., Thomas-Maddox, C., Richmond, V.P., McCroskey, J.C. (2008). Quantitative Research Methods for Communication. USA: Oxford University Press.

Entry conditions

We recognise a range of qualifications for admission to our courses. In addition to the specific entry conditions for this course you must also meet the University’s General Entrance Requirements.

In this section

Entry Requirements

A second class honours degree from the United Kingdom or the Republic of Ireland, or a qualification which is recognised as being of an equivalent standard from an institution of another country; and evidence of competence in written and spoken English (GCSE grade C or equivalent; IELTS 6.5 or equivalent)

English Language Requirements

English language requirements for international applicants
The minimum requirement for this course is Academic IELTS 6.0 with no band score less than 5.5. Trinity ISE: Pass at level III also meets this requirement for Tier 4 visa purposes.

Ulster recognises a number of other English language tests and comparable IELTS equivalent scores.

Teaching and learning assessment

The course will provide you with the opportunity to develop teaching and research skills, in a flexible, inclusive and accessible environment, empowering you in your professional development as an English Language teacher. All modules link learning, teaching and employment, with a broad range of methods being adopted including but not limited to: face to face teaching, reflective practice, integration of theory and practice, research projects/reports, etc. Content of modules and their assessment activities focus you on key concepts and ideas central to linguistics and TESOL. Within the modules, generic skills are taught and assessed, and are transferable across the subject areas and most importantly into the professional TESOL context.

Careers & opportunities

In this section

Career options

The programme is designed for students planning for careers in teaching or research in TESOL contexts.

Work placement / study abroad

The programme includes a supervised teaching practice module in semester 2.

Apply

How to apply Request a prospectus

Applications to our postgraduate courses are made through the University’s online application system.

Start dates

  • October 2018

Fees and funding

In this section

Fees (total cost)

Important notice - fees information Fees illustrated are based on 18/19 entry and are subject to an annual increase. Correct at the time of publishing. Terms and conditions apply. Additional mandatory costs are highlighted where they are known in advance. There are other costs associated with university study.
Visit our Fees pages for full details of fees

Northern Ireland & EU:
£5,500.00
International:
£13,680.00  Scholarships available

Additional mandatory costs

Tuition fees and costs associated with accommodation, travel (including car parking charges), and normal living are a part of university life.

Where a course has additional mandatory expenses we make every effort to highlight them. These may include residential visits, field trips, materials (e.g. art, design, engineering) inoculations, security checks, computer equipment, uniforms, professional memberships etc.

We aim to provide students with the learning materials needed to support their studies. Our libraries are a valuable resource with an extensive collection of books and journals as well as first-class facilities and IT equipment. Computer suites and free wifi is also available on each of the campuses.

There will be some additional costs to being a student which cannot be itemised and these will be different for each student. You may choose to purchase your own textbooks and course materials or prefer your own computer and software. Printing and binding may also be required. There are additional fees for graduation ceremonies, examination resits and library fines. Additional costs vary from course to course.

Students choosing a period of paid work placement or study abroad as part of their course should be aware that there may be additional travel and living costs as well as tuition fees.

Please contact the course team for more information.

Tuition fees and costs associated with accommodation, travel (including car parking charges), and normal living are a part of university life.

Where a course has additional mandatory expenses we make every effort to highlight them. These may include residential visits, field trips, materials (e.g. art, design, engineering) inoculations, security checks, computer equipment, uniforms, professional memberships etc.

We aim to provide students with the learning materials needed to support their studies. Our libraries are a valuable resource with an extensive collection of books and journals as well as first-class facilities and IT equipment. Computer suites and free wifi is also available on each of the campuses.

There will be some additional costs to being a student which cannot be itemised and these will be different for each student. You may choose to purchase your own textbooks and course materials or prefer your own computer and software. Printing and binding may also be required. There are additional fees for graduation ceremonies, examination resits and library fines. Additional costs vary from course to course.

Students choosing a period of paid work placement or study abroad as part of their course should be aware that there may be additional travel and living costs as well as tuition fees.

Please contact the course team for more information.

Contact

Course Director: Dr. Juliana Gerard

E: j.gerard@ulster.ac.uk

For more information visit

Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

School of Communication and Media