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Overview

The only postgraduate course in the UK and Ireland dedicated to the study of gender, conflict and human rights.

Summary

The LLM Gender, Conflict and Human Rights draws on the established research excellence of the Transitional Justice Institute to deliver a world-leading masters programme in the field.

This programme has been developed to enable students to:

  • Gain a systematic understanding, in-depth knowledge and critical awareness of the differential experiences of women and men of human rights norms and institutions, especially in conflict and post-conflict situations;

    • Understand foundational concepts in gender theory and their application to human rights, international law and transitional justice;

    • Gain knowledge and skills in carrying out research projects from design to write-up;

    • Enhance skills in critically appraising published and commissioned research;

    • Develop skills highly relevant to legal practice, and to gender policy, research and advocacy roles in the voluntary, public and private sectors in the UK, Ireland and beyond;

    • Successful completion may also open up a range of further study and research options.

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About this course

In this section

About

The Transitional Justice Institute in Northern Ireland is uniquely placed to deliver an effective and stimulating programme of study in this area. Key highlights of the programme include:

• Opportunity to undertake an LLM programme with a specific focus on gender and transitional justice – the only LLM programme of its type in the UK or Ireland;

• Teaching is delivered by active researchers in the TJI, many of whom have received international recognition for their work;

• Gain unique insights into the differential legal protection of human rights of women and men in transitional contexts, while studying in a society currently in a process of transition;

• Take advantage of the opportunities to specialise in identified areas e.g. human rights, transitional justice, peace and conflict research in divided societies;

• Enhance the skills you need for working on gender and human rights issues in a range of sectors;

• Internship opportunities with a range of organizations. In previous years students have secured internships with the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission, Disability Action (Centre on Human Rights), Human Rights Consortium, Law Centre (NI) and Northern Ireland Council for Ethnic Minorities (NICEM).

• Extensive events programme (TJI Seminar Series, International Conferences) and distinguished Visiting Scholars programme.

• Excellent library facilities on campus. Students also have sole access to a dedicated LLM computer suite;

• Fully equipped LLM teaching rooms with integrated audio visual and video conferencing facilities.

Attendance

Attendance is compulsory for successful completion of the LLM. Modules are delivered through weekly half-day classes or fortnightly full-day classes.

Start dates

  • September 2018
How to apply

Modules

Here is a guide to the subjects studied on this course.

Courses are continually reviewed to take advantage of new teaching approaches and developments in research, industry and the professions. Please be aware that modules may change for your year of entry. The exact modules available and their order may vary depending on course updates, staff availability, timetabling and student demand. Please contact the course team for the most up to date module list.

In this section

Year one

Gender and Human Rights

Year: 1

This module examines the international legal instruments for the guarantee of women's civil and political rights and economic and social rights will be examined for students to acquire knowledge and understanding of the basic texts and the international monitoring mechanisms. Detailed attention is accorded to the United Nations Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women, 1979. The impact of certain conceptual assumptions within international law, and human rights law in particular, that militates against the adequate protection of women's rights are considered.

Gender and Transition

Year: 1

This module offers a singular introduction to the interplay between human rights, humanitarian law and feminist theory. It explores the gendered experiences of women in times of conflict and repression, emphasizing in particular the harms which women may experience. It then follows-through with an exploration of the role and visibility of women in the contexts of peace-making, peace-enforcement and transition. The module explores the absence of women in key decision-making and representative contexts, and examines the extent to which transitional justice accountability processes are gender sensitive. The module is also focused on identifying mechanisms which would improve accountability, visibility and gender equality for women in situations of transition.

Year two

Dissertation Research Methods

Year: 2

This module provides a full range of skills which students need to be able to produce rigorous pieces of research as part of their dissertation, and prepare for professional stages and a career in human rights law and/or transitional justice. It attempts to bridge the gap between academic and practical law. The understanding of sources of public international law and study techniques including transferable skills in areas such as performing UN- research and time-management is a fundamentally skill. This understanding can then be applied to help support a practical approach to learning.

Dissertation

Year: 2

This module allows students to apply the research skills acquired and explore the issues broached in the taught modules, by conducting an effective critical investigation of an area of concern or interest in human rights law and transitional justice, and to write a report on that investigation.

Foundations of Transitional Justice

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module aims to equip students to critically engage with the emerging field of transitional justice. Students will relate the dilemmas of societies in transition from violent conflict and/or from authoritarian regimes to the imperatives of international human rights law and international humanitarian law. Students will gain a critical understanding of the political and legal dilemmas that confront societies emerging from conflict and authoritarianism, and will critically reflect upon a wide range of transitional justice mechanisms. They will be invited to apply that legal and structural knowledge to contemporary situations of armed conflict and transition.

Memory, Transition and Conflict

Year: 2

This module is optional

`Memory, Conflict and Transition? is an optional module which seeks to encourage socio-legal and social science analyses surrounding the out-workings of political violence in transitional societies with the emphasis on divided societies. Key issues will include the legitimisation of political violence, the construction of victim hierarchies, theories of social memory, collective memory and conflict resolution and political transformation, and the interplay between memory, identity and conflict in transitional societies. The module will also advance knowledge in a developing pillar of transitional justice policy making and academic analysis, the use of commemoration and memorialisation.

Economic, Social and Cultural Rights

Year: 2

This module is optional

Day 1. ESCRs: Nature, Concepts and Measurement

Session one: On the Nature of ESCRs

Session two: Progressive Realization of ESCRs: Concept and Measurement

Day 2. Domestic and Regional Protection of ESCRs

Session one: ESCRs in Domestic Legal Systems

Session two: ESCRs in Regional Human Rights Systems

Day 3. Selected Substantive ESCRs

Session one: The Right to Health

Session two: The Right to Work and Education

Equality Law

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module introduces the students to core principles of equality law, with a focus upon the law of Northern Ireland but in the context of British, European, comparative constitutional and international law. It examines a spectrum of non-discrimination and equality law concepts and their enforcement over the key grounds and considers the future development of equality law.

Transitions from Conflict: Law and Politics

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module explores the ways law is politicised and the rule of law is (re)introduced to political life during transitions from conflict. It analyses the often competing political factors that influence international and national post-conflict law formation, in the forms of UN Security Council resolutions, international conventions, peace agreements and transitional constitutions to deal with legacies of mass violence. In addition, the module considers the extent to which legal actors, such as legislators, judges and lawyers, are influenced by political factors. This course complements the core Foundations of Transitional Justice module.

Transitional Justice in Comparative and Regional Perspectives

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module gives students the chance to explore how the myriad conceptual, legal, social and political challenges of truth, justice, reparations, reconciliation and memory interact and play out ?on the ground? in a particular region or set of countries around the world. Techniques of comparative and case study methodology drawn from social science as well as law are explored and then applied, to allow development of critical insight alongside in-depth specialist knowledge of one region or set of cases. The differences between post-authoritarian, post-conflict and ongoing conflict transitional challenges, the relationship between global and local TJ dynamics, the articulation of regional with national and international legal and political institutions, the bottom-up, civil society-driven nature of much transitional justice change, and the importance of contextual knowledge and historical, including post-colonial, sensibility for today?s transitional justice scholar and practitioner will all be emphasised. This module will focus, in any given year, on one of: Latin America/ Africa/ Europe/ the Middle East

Foundations of International Human Rights Law

Year: 2

This module is optional

The module will enable the student to master the complex and specialised area of international human rights law. Students will be encouraged to develop an in-depth critical understanding of both the content of international human rights standards and the various means by which they are enforced. It will act as a foundational basis which will enable learners to study issues in greater detail in subsequent modules. These have been developed in response to the growth of new areas of interest in international human rights law. The aim will be to provide students with a degree that reflects contemporary international human rights law and enables them to make good use of the expertise of staff.

International Humanitarian Law in Transitional Justice Contexts

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module considers the international law rules which govern whether and when States are entitled to use armed force, including the prohibition of the use of force contained in the UN Charter as well as the exceptions to that prohibition. In particular, we will examine the arguments on the legitimacy of humanitarian intervention and the responsibility to protect doctrine. The main part of the course examines the law that applies during an armed conflict. We begin by considering the distinction between the law applicable to international armed conflicts and that applicable to non-international armed conflicts. In this part of the module, we will gain an overview of the "Geneva law" relating to the humanitarian protection of victims of armed conflict and the "Hague law" relating to the means and methods of warfare. In particular, we will examine the distinction between combatants and civilians and the obligation to protect civilians.

Entry conditions

We recognise a range of qualifications for admission to our courses. In addition to the specific entry conditions for this course you must also meet the University’s General Entrance Requirements.

In this section

Entry Requirements

A second class Honours degree or above or equivalent recognised qualification in Law, Social Sciences, Humanities or a cognate discipline. Allowance may be made for special qualifications, experience and background, and students with other academic backgrounds will be considered, where applicants can demonstrate their ability to undertake the programme through the accreditation of prior experiential learning (APEL) or accreditation of prior learning (APL).

English Language Requirements

English language requirements for international applicants
The minimum requirement for this course is Academic IELTS 6.0 with no band score less than 5.5. Trinity ISE: Pass at level III also meets this requirement for Tier 4 visa purposes.

Ulster recognises a number of other English language tests and comparable IELTS equivalent scores.

Teaching and learning assessment

Weekly three hour semianrs or fortnightly full day seminars. Assessment by essays and presentations.

Careers & opportunities

In this section

Career options

Successful completion of the LLM

Previous graduates have gone onto positions in the local human rights sector and public sector in Northern Ireland, to legal practice in areas related to the LLM and to PhD research. Further, previous graduates have secured work in the United Nations and in international non-governmental organisations.

Work placement / study abroad

The Transitional Justice Institute works closely with a range of human rights organisations that regularly offer internship opportunities to our LLM students – including the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission, Human Rights Consortium, Law Centre (NI) and Northern Ireland Council for Ethnic Minorities (NICEM).

Apply

How to apply Request a prospectus

Applications to our postgraduate courses are made through the University’s online application system.

Start dates

  • September 2018

Fees and funding

In this section

Fees (total cost)

Important notice - fees information Fees illustrated are based on 18/19 entry and are subject to an annual increase. Correct at the time of publishing. Terms and conditions apply. Additional mandatory costs are highlighted where they are known in advance. There are other costs associated with university study.
Visit our Fees pages for full details of fees

Northern Ireland & EU:
£5,500.00

Scholarships, awards and prizes

Northern Ireland Human Righst Commission Dissertation Prize

Additional mandatory costs

Tuition fees and costs associated with accommodation, travel (including car parking charges), and normal living are a part of university life.

Where a course has additional mandatory expenses we make every effort to highlight them. These may include residential visits, field trips, materials (e.g. art, design, engineering) inoculations, security checks, computer equipment, uniforms, professional memberships etc.

We aim to provide students with the learning materials needed to support their studies. Our libraries are a valuable resource with an extensive collection of books and journals as well as first-class facilities and IT equipment. Computer suites and free wifi is also available on each of the campuses.

There will be some additional costs to being a student which cannot be itemised and these will be different for each student. You may choose to purchase your own textbooks and course materials or prefer your own computer and software. Printing and binding may also be required. There are additional fees for graduation ceremonies, examination resits and library fines. Additional costs vary from course to course.

Students choosing a period of paid work placement or study abroad as part of their course should be aware that there may be additional travel and living costs as well as tuition fees.

Please contact the course team for more information.

Contact

For further information on the Transitional Justice Institute, please see www.transitionaljustice.ulster.ac.uk.

Inquiries concerning the LLM can be directed to llm@ulster.ac.uk.