Ulster University

Enabling Healthy Ageing - Life Sciences Research Showcased

TheUniversityofUlster’s ground-breaking research in life sciences will beshowcasedat a series of high profile international events in Derry~Londonderry next month.

C-TRIC's 5th Annual Translational Medicine Conference(TMED5)on the theme ‘Enabling Healthy Ageing’willtakeplace in the City Hotel from May 2 – 3 and has attracted some of the world’s leading players in life sciences research and innovation.

C-TRIC, a purpose builtaward winning clinical research facilityatAltnagelvinHospital, was developed as a joint partnership between the University of Ulster at Magee, Western Health and Social Care Trust (Western Trust) and Derry City Council, with fundingfrom Ilex (urban regeneration company) and Invest Northern Ireland.

TheannualC-TRIC conference, which is widely recognised as a leading international conference in translational medicine and healthcare innovation, has gone fromstrength to strength. Last yearit wasattended by over 160 delegates from across Europe,the USA andAsia.

A number ofworld renowned players in life sciences research and innovation will speak atthis year’s event, includingAnne Snowdon, Chair of the International Centre for HealthInnovation, Canada,DrZahidLatif, Technology Strategy Boardand ProfessorBobLangerfromMassachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston whowilladdress delegatesviavideo.

TMED5 will explore the challenges of delivering healthcare to an ageing population and showcase novel approaches in disease prevention and disease management, including diagnosis and therapy interventions.

The programmefor the three day eventincludespresentations by experts in nursing, psychology, computing, biomedical science and bioengineering who will outline novel approaches and solutions to key global challenges in managing and caring for an ageing population.

Professor Tony Bjourson, C-TRIC Board Member and Chair of the conference organising committee explained: "Translational medicine is a term used to describe for ‘bench-to-bedside’ approach and the speeding up of the time for research to be converted into real advances that actually benefit patients and society.

"It requires a multi-disciplinary approach to reduce R&D costs involved in the development of innovative health technologies, medical devices and therapeutics and it is a multi-million pound industry.”

Professor Bjourson, who is also Director of the Biomedical Sciences Research Institute at Ulster’sColerainecampus, said the aim of the conference is to encourage greater collaboration and communicationbetweenthe stakeholders including academics, clinicians, researchers and industry R&D managers to inform research and clinical interventions and explore novel approaches to enable healthyageing.

Dr Maurice O'Kane, Chief Executive of C-TRIC and Head of Research and Development, Western Trust said: “TMED5 demonstrates how in partnership we can play a vital role in translating medical advances from the laboratory bench to the patient's bedside. This is an essential step that will ultimately lead to improving the care we offer patients and the public.

"TMED5 has attracted a range of national and international sponsors includingBostonbased Partners Healthcare, the Association of British Pharmaceutical Industries,Celerion, theUniversityofUlster NORIBIC, the Public Health Agency forNorthern Ireland, the Western Health and Social Care Trust and Invest NorthernIreland.

Other life sciences related events takingplace in Derry~Londonderry next month which highlight the pivotal role of university-led research in this burgeoning sector related events include: the ‘Innovation for Health and Wealth Forum’ which will explore the future development of the life sciences sector in Northern Ireland and 'TMED Health Hack' aimed at developing new apps and technology for health and wellbeing.

The full conference programme can be accessed athttp://www.c-tric.com/tmed5

Caption: Professor Tony Bjourson
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